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28

Eventual consistency: I tell you that it's going to rain tomorrow. Your neighbor tells his wife that it's going to be sunny tomorrow. You tell your neighbor that it is going to rain tomorrow. Eventually, all of the servers (you, me, your neighbor) know the truth (that it's going to rain tomorrow), but in the meantime the client (his wife) came away ...


15

If you want to have a Distributed System (that "Eventual Consistency" thing) you need people, build, maintain and to operate it. I found that there are three classes of people which have very little problems with "Eventual Consistency": People with a solid background in distributed systems. They have learned about Eventual Consistency Byzantine Failures ...


11

The solution I went with was to add a System aggregate root that could maintain a list of the current Facility names. When creating a new Facility, I use the System aggregate (only one System as a global object / singleton) as a factory for it. If the given facility name already exists, then it will throw a validation error. This keeps the validation ...


7

I just finished my review of several similar databases. I ended up with Mongo for different reasons. Riak and Cassandra are both implementations of Amazon's Dynamo, which could each do a good job of that. At the Riak site, they have good comparisons of Riak and a few other databases. For your specific question, I think both Riak and Cassandra handle ...


7

A Task Based UI fits this model great. You create and execute tasks from the UI. You can also have something like a task status monitor to show the user when a task has executed. Another option is to use some kind of pooling from the client. You send the command, and pool from the client until the command completed and the new data is available. You will ...


7

If you were to watch the database communication during a query with Fiddler, or request the RavenQueryStatistics in your query like this... RavenQueryStatistics stats; var result = session.Query<Location>() .Customize(x => x.WaitForNonStaleResultsAsOfNow()) .Statistics(out stats) .Where(l => l.Name = ...


5

Eventual consistency: Your data is replicated on multiple servers Your clients can access any of the servers to retrieve the data Someone writes a piece of data to one of the servers, but it wasn't yet copied to the rest A client accesses the server with the data, and gets the most up-to-date copy A different client (or even the same client) accesses a ...


5

I can speak only for CouchDB but there is no need to choose between eventual consistency and ACID, they are not in the same category. CouchDB is fully ACID. A document update is atomic, consistent, isolated and durable (using CouchDB's recommended production setting of delayed_commits=false, your update is flushed to disk before the 201 success code is ...


5

I recommend against using the actual SimpleDB service for unit testing your own code. You will be testing your code + the SimpleDB client + the network + SimpleDB itself. What you need is mock SimpleDB client to run unit tests against. This way you are only testing the code that needs to be tested. Test driven development call upon you to not test if the ...


5

http://codebetter.com/blogs/gregyoung/archive/2010/08/12/eventual-consistency-and-set-validation.aspx


5

There are a couple of points about this question. 1) You aren't guaranteed to have read-after-write consistency unless you're using either "safe=true", "w=1" (or greater) or "j=true" with your write. You can either include these as part of the insert() or update() commands, or else use set_lasterror_options() to set these options for the connection, ...


4

No. Even fetching by key, you cannot rely on a strongly consistent count (though it will be more up to date than it would otherwise). Batch get operations are not transactional, so one of the shards could be updated while you are fetching them. Asking for strong consistency here is kind of meaningless, however. First, in a distributed system like App ...


4

Other than being quite expensive the whole thing, you will be able to get all your entities right away. Note that iterating through millions of entities will require to use Tasks and if that is not enough, since they have a deadline of 10 minutes, you should consider using Backends.


4

If "Anti-entropy protocols for repairing replicated data, which operate by comparing replicas and reconciling differences." fits your definition look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gossip_protocol


4

I have been reading and learning about NoSQL and MongoDB, CouchDB, etc, for the last two days, but I still can't tell if this is the right kind of storage for me. NoSQL databases solve a set of problems, that are hard(er) to solve with traditional RDMS. NoSQL can be the right storage for you if any of your problems are in that set. Does eventual ...


4

You can have distributed consistency (for a single operation) without transactions, but not atomicity (for groups of operations). Although 'consistency' in Cassandra is used in a slightly more specific sense than for ACID databases in general. Cassandra supports tunable consistency levels (CLs) - you can specify the consistency level for each read and ...


4

Good question. We've had http://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CASSANDRA-876 open for a while to add this, but nobody's bothered finishing it because CL.ONE is just fine for a LOT of workloads without any extra gymnastics Reads are so fast anyway that doing the extra one is not a big deal (and in fact Read Repair, which is on by default, means all the ...


4

The QUORUM CL read does not guarantee the consistency of your data. What guarantees consistency is the following disequation (WRITE CL + READ CL) > REPLICATION FACTOR Translating the minimum W+R needed to guarantee data-consistency is WRITE ALL + READ ONE WRITE ONE + READ ALL WRITE QUORUM + READ QUORUM Like said in the post, if you have a ...


4

Short answer: Writing successfully in strongly consistent mode requires that your write succeed on a majority of servers that can contain the record, therefore any future consistent reads will always see the same data, because a consistent read must read a majority of the servers that can contain the desired record. If you do not perform a strongly ...


3

I'll use MySQL to illustrate the answer, since you mentioned it, though, obviously, neither of us is implying that DynamoDB runs on MySQL. In a single network with one MySQL master and any number of slaves, the answer seems extremely straightforward -- for eventual consistency, fetch the answer from a randomly-selected slave; for read-after-write ...


3

Having an index, builtin or composite, on a property that contains a monotonically increasing value (such as the current timestamp) may not perform as well as you may want at high write rates. This type of workload will generate a hotspot, as the tail of the index is constantly being updated as opposed to the load being distributed throughout the sorted ...


3

I would recommend a combination of these two approaches: Create a Login entity, which consists of a user's email and id of a main User entity. Make user's email a key in Login entity. This ensures its uniqueness. The added bonus is that you can link more than one email address to the same User entity. (We have this option as a feature in our app). ...


3

There are 2 ways: To trick a user (just to show that things has happened then they really hasn't happened yet) Show that system is processing request and use polling in background (not good) or just timer with value of your SLA. I prefer the 1st option.


3

Those docs aren't quite correct. Regardless of the consistency level (CL), writes are sent to all available replicas. If replicas aren't available, Cassandra won't send a request to the down nodes. If there aren't enough available from the outset to satisfy the CL, an UnavailableException is thrown and no write is attempted to any node. However, the ...


3

A queue with retries most of the time solves such issues. If your handler/aggregate/denormalizer can't process a message, because preconditions are not met - fail it hard. Then you'll process some more messages from the queue until this one becomes visible again. If message fails more than 3 times - discard it into error queue for further analysis. If it's ...


3

I'd recommend you have a look at the Microsoft Patterns & Practices team's guidance on CQRS. Although this is still work-in-progress they have given one solution to the issue you've raised. Their approach for commands requiring feedback is to submit the command asynchronously, redirect to another controller action and then poll the read model for the ...


3

There are a few different ways of doing it; Wait at user till consistent Just poll the server until you get the read model updated. This is similar to what Ben showed. Ensure consistency through 2PC You have a queue that supports DTC; and your commands are put there first. They are then; executed, events sent, read model updated; all inside a single ...


3

The aggregate itself needs to be consistent, however related aggregates can be eventually consistent with respect to each other. In fact, eventual consistency is a common paradigm in DDD within distributed scenarios. The aggregate can be thought of as a consistency boundary. This means that an aggregate is defined in terms of what must be consistent rather ...


3

Generally you would be queuing the messages. If they are going into a queue you will get proper ordering. If you want to use something that does not support ordering with your servicebus then add a sequence number to your events so the other side can properly reorder them. TCP has been doing this since 1981 http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc793.txt :)


3

I'm the author of Motor and I know a bit about AsyncMongo too. Here's Motor's documentation regarding safe writes: http://emptysquare.net/motor/pymongo/api/motor/differences.html#acknowledged-writes Short answer: Whatever code you execute in a callback to insert(), update(), etc., if those inserts or updates are safe, will see the data in MongoDB after the ...



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