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4

No, you don't. The init function EVP_CipherInit_ex is actually initializing variables in EVP_CIPHER_CTX object ectx, which you pass as the first argument. Just remember to call EVP_CIPHER_CTX_cleanup(&ectx) when you're done.


3

Please look at EVP_CIPHER_name here. See, if it can solve your purpose.


2

NewCipher expects the key not the iv, and since you're passing it a 128bit iv it works as aes128cbc.


2

You don't have any key derivation in your AES_* code, so you should not use any key derivation such as EVP_BytesToKey in your new EVP_ code if you want to stay fully compatible. And no, there is no way to make EVP_BytesToKey output the same key as above, because a cryptographic hash is used to generate the output.


2

Try echo -n. You're also hashing the end of line marker. $ echo -e "aaa" | md5sum 5c9597f3c8245907ea71a89d9d39d08e - $ echo -n "aaa" | md5sum 47bce5c74f589f4867dbd57e9ca9f808 -


1

From what I can dig up from the source code of OpenSSL and Crypto++, it seems like the input data actually get copied and stored. Can anyone confirm this? Yes and no. The input is not usually stored. Partial inputs are buffered until a full block is available to process. The buffering is part of the state of the hash. Once consumed, the storage for the ...


1

For the sign/unsign key part I need further information, how is this signature done? For example, is this signature an X byte length at the end of the file and can then easily be removed? For items 2-5 in your list the following code will surely assist, it is based on the examples from openssl documentation with more comments and adaptations for your needs. ...


1

uint8_t type will be small, these functions return at least 8 bytes


1

Using this key (sym.key) I have encrypted a file with below command. openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -in temp.txt -out temp.enc -kfile sym.key Not quite. openssl enc -kfile reads the first line, and only the first line, of the file and uses it as the password, which is not the same thing as the key. enc has three options to enter a password, after which it runs ...


1

You cannot use string functions on binary data. This is especially the case if that binary data is indistinguishable from random. Random binary data may contain null characters anywhere, or not at all. strdup uses strcpy internally, which relies on the null character to be present.


1

You probably miss that the encrypted string may contain zero-bytes, so the strlen(s) in DecryptUpdate has a too low value. You have to remember from encrypt how long the encrypted data is and use that value for decrypting.


1

I think you are confusing properties of an algorithm with the properties of an object or - in C terms - contexts. MD5 has the one way property, just like the sun has the property to give a yellowish light. You cannot remove or configure that property. So you need to use different hash methods, not configure a specific one. Note that MD5 is not a MAC in ...


1

This is incorrect: char *passphrase; printf("\nEnter a Pass Phrase:"); scanf("%s",passphrase); char *pasphrase is just a pointer point to unknown location. Change this to: char passphrase[2048]; printf("\nEnter a Pass Phrase:"); scanf("%s", passphrase);


1

What is going on line by line: gcc Testfile.c -lssl -lcrypto Testfile.c:(.text+0xec): undefined reference to `EVP_idea_ecb' OpenSSL library of Debian Jessie x64 doesn't contain EVP_idea_ecb. gcc Testfile.c -lss /usr/bin/ld: /tmp/ccgbkhFA.o: undefined reference to symbol 'EVP_CIPHER_iv_length@@OPENSSL_1.0.0' //usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0: ...


1

Invalid characters generated while encrypting with openssl evp aes_256_ctr() mode... ... because i find invalid characters being present in the cipher text which cannot be stored in a file I think this is your problem. Its not quite correct. You can store anything (any character) in a file. C-strings are a little different, but you are not working ...


1

When using the OpenSSL crypto libraries in C/C++, does the EVP interface automatically support AES-NI Yes. EVP_* is the official/supported way to ensure AES-NI is used (if available). In fact, EVP is the only way to access hardware acceleration in general. Using low level AES routines (like AES_encrypt and AES_decrypt) are software only-implementations, ...


1

As Wikipedia correctly notes, zero-padding is not standardized for encryption. It may not be deterministic if the plaintext can end with 00 bytes. Furthermore, there are implementations that add an additional block if the plaintext contains an integral number of blocks, others do not add an additional block. I haven't seen zero-padding in the EVP cipher ...


1

Use RSA *EVP_PKEY_get1_RSA(EVP_PKEY *pkey) to get RSA type key from EVP_PKEY. Example: EVP_PKEY *evp; RSA *pubkey evp = ...; /* some way to get the public key */ pubkey = EVP_PKEY_get1_RSA(evp); if (pubkey == NULL) { /* error handling */ }



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