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23

The reason you get EXC_BAD_ACCESS is that the -initWithObjects: method expects all of its arguments to be valid Objective-C objects. Each Objective-C object starts with a small header; this used to be a straightforward pointer, called isa, to its class object (it isn't necessarily quite this simple any more, and these days you shouldn't poke about yourself; ...


15

EXC_I386_GPFLT is surely referring to "General Protection fault", which is the x86's way to tell you that "you did something that you are not allowed to do". It typically DOESN'T mean that you access out of memory bounds, but it could be that your code is going out of bounds and causing bad code/data to be used in a way that makes for an protection violation ...


12

To anyone that might experience the same thing with Xcode 5.0.1 and Mavericks: Try deleting all your schemes and auto create them again - that fixed it for me.


12

No, EXC_BAD_ACCESS is not the same as SIGSEGV. EXC_BAD_ACCESS is a Mach exception (A combination of Mach and xnu compose the Mac OS X kernel), while SIGSEGV is a POSIX signal. When crashes occur with cause given as EXC_BAD_ACCESS, often the signal is reported in parentheses immediately after: For instance, EXC_BAD_ACCESS(SIGSEGV). However, there is one ...


8

I was having the same problem and I solved it manually pausing the root SKView in the ViewController before the app moving to the background: - (void)viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; // Configure the view (already setup as SKView via storyboard) SKView * skView = (SKView *)self.view; // Create and configure the scene. SKScene *scene ...


6

You can often get information from the header files. For example: $ cd /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.9.sdk $ find usr -name \*.h -exec fgrep -l EXC_I386_GPFLT {} \; usr/include/mach/i386/exception.h ^C $ more usr/include/mach/i386/exception.h .... #define EXC_I386_GPFLT 13 /* ...


6

You can not primitive types into Dictionary. Wrap the variable total with NSNumber and then put it into Dictionary. NSDictionary *newDict = [[NSDictionary alloc] initWithObjectsAndKeys:@"Sat. Jan 6th, 2014", @"date", originField.text, @"origin", destinationField.text, @"destination", [NSNumber numberWithInteger:[startField.text integerValue]], @"start", ...


5

The first argument you're passing to initWithObjects: is an object (it's an instance of NSString), but the next two are not. It's illegal to insert non-object types into an Objective-C collection. You need to prefix all of the string literals with @ symbols to make them all objects, as shown below: NSArray *items = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"A", ...


5

Use a better background session configuration identifier, please! This is not really your session; a background session is a kind of gateway into a shared system session. You need to distinguish your session's tasks from those of all the other apps doing background uploading and downloading. Use something unique, like @"com.company.appname.specialname". ...


5

NSUserDefaults is not documented to be KVO compliant so it's not possible to observe defaults by their key. This might be the reason for the crash but without a stack trace it's not possible to tell. There is a notification you can register for that announces changes to the defaults system: NSUserDefaultsDidChangeNotification.


5

For any EXC_BAD_ACCESS errors, you are usually trying to send a message to a released object. The BEST way to track these down is use NSZombieEnabled. This works by never actually releasing an object, but by wrapping it up as a "zombie" and setting a flag inside it that says it normally would have been released. This way, if you try to access it again, it ...


5

It's due to the nil handler. You must always do the following: if (hasSucceeded) { hasSucceeded(someValue); } The crash is caused by dereferencing the nil block pointer. This is different from trying to call a method on a nil variable reference (which is fine). You must never dereference a nil block pointer. There is some great information about this ...


4

I have changed the UISwitch Thumb Tint color to default and problem solved. I hate Xcode! Thanks for all answers and tips.


4

please learn what is pointer first. your problem is trying to dereference invalid pointer. -(void)start { [self startMenu]; // calls a method that prints the menu options char selectedOption = '\0'; char w = 'w'; char n = 'n'; char b = 'b'; bool validOption = NO; while(!validOption) { scanf("%c", &selectedOption); ...


4

Maybe is too late but for further assistance, on LLDB: (lldb) p *(MyClassToPrint*)memory_address E.g. (lldb) p *(HomeViewController*)0x0a2bf700


4

You're not resetting the j iterator on the erase action: i->second.erase(j); invalidates the j iterator. You need to do this: j = i->second.erase(j); and more importantly, skip the increment, which means move it to an else condition in the body of the loop. Something like this: if (0 == (*it->second).counter()) { // do your thing, ...


4

The cause of the crash is [achievementDescription maximumPoints], the maximumPoints property return an NSInteger not a NSNumber instance. Change it to : [NSNumber numberWithInteger:[achievementDescription maximumPoints]], @"Maximum Points", ...


4

Somehow A-Live comment gave me an idea and I found out how to avoid the crash. I was using argList twice in the same va_start/va_end block [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat: format arguments: argList]; and NSLogv(format, argList); It seems that iOS 64-bits simulator don't like it. Don't know why it works just find in any other plateforme (and real ...


4

obj could deallocate right after assignment, because it's an unsafe_unretained reference, so -setReturnValue: gets dangling pointer as an argument. If unsafe_unretained is unavoidable for setter path, (since -[NSInvocation getArgument:atIndex:] may not work properly with strong reference, thanks @Tommy for noting this), you could handle getter path ...


3

You implemented the singleton pattern improperly in modern Objective-C. In this example, let's call your Singleton class method, sharedInstance. Initialize your singleton as follows: + (id)sharedInstance { static id sharedInstance = nil; static dispatch_once_t onceToken; dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{ sharedInstance = [[self alloc] ...


3

Did set the map view delegate to nil before navigating away from the page. Also I think there is some memory management issue with IOS maps. So It is better to release maps in the dealloc method.


3

You get EXC_BAC_ACCESS because you are trying to access object which was removed from memory. It happens only on device when you navigate to many windows because every window takes some part of memory and when there is no more space for new windows iOS clears old objects who were deleted by you previously. You can replicate this issue on simulator by ...


3

setTitle will fail in iOS7. Try below code from this blog: -(void)searchDisplayControllerWillBeginSearch:(UISearchDisplayController *)controller{ self.searchDisplayController.searchBar.showsCancelButton = YES; UIButton *cancelButton; UIView *topView = self.searchDisplayController.searchBar.subviews[0]; for (UIView *subView in ...


3

After debugging a lot I found that it happens when the following NSURLSessionTaskDelegate protocol method is not implemented by the delegate: - (void)URLSession:(NSURLSession *)session task:(NSURLSessionTask *)task didCompleteWithError:(NSError *)error { } Adding this method to the delegate solves the error. The "strange" thing is that the delegate method ...


3

I have a similar situation happening in my app. [NSMutableAttributedString initWithData:] can take a very long time to return, especially for large inputs. My guess is, while this call is executing, the UIKit rotation handling code needs to run, but, since your main thread is stuck on the initWithData: call, things go a little out of whack. Try moving the ...


3

You may have already solved this issue, but I was getting the same crash report and realized that I was trying to add an annotation at an invalid coordinate. My data source (an API that returns JSON) was giving me an invalid latitude value. I altered this code: //add the Station object to the array [stations addObject:tempStation]; // <--(this ...


3

It appears that checkWordToSearch is calling gameWithWord, but gameWithWord also appears to call checkWordToSearch. If so, that sort recursion can cause the behavior you describe (crashing in seemingly random places). I'd suggest double checking the logic to make sure that it's exiting the recursive loop like you obviously intended. Or, better, change it so ...


3

unarchiveObjectWithData: expects its argument to be an instance of NSData. That is not what [data bytes] returns. You probably just want data.


3

Try this - (void) badAccess { void (*nullFunction)() = NULL; nullFunction(); }


3

It seems that you tap alert when its delegate is released: delegate:self It happens because UIAlertView delegate property is of assign type (not weak!). So your delegate potentially can point to released object. Solution: in dealloc method you need to clear delegate for your alertView - (void)dealloc { _alertView.delegate = nil; } But before you ...



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