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6

This might be too late but if you add worksheet.Columns.AutoFit(); or worksheet.Rows.AutoFit(); it also works.


4

The exception in my example was produced with VS 2013 on Windows 7. In this case, the call to EventSetInformation could not be resolved as the function could not be found in advapi32.dll. Then, I tested the same code with Visual Studio 2015 CTP and it ran to completion without any exceptions. This led me to believe it was a version conflict. Also, according ...


4

You are attempting to set the ColorIndex to 0, not comparing it to 0. Use == when you compare. foreach (Excel.Range row in rows) { if (row.Cells.EntireRow.Interior.ColorIndex == 0) // changed = to == { row.Interior.Color = System.Drawing.Color.Red; } }


4

If it helps here is an example of a simple VB.NET app that I wrote a long time ago to test speed of VB vs C#. It is a different way of going about creating a workbook and writing to it. Imports Excel = Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel Public Class Form1 Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click ...


3

You should retrieve the Cell Format. I don't have excel here but I think it should be something like: myworksheet.Cells[row, col].Font.Strikethrough; See this question: Reading text format from Excel using Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel If that doesn't work, look at answer of Danny, he tells you should check if a character is StrikeTrough.


3

You need to use == operator instead of = operator. == operator for equality but = operator is for assignment. if (row.Cells.EntireRow.Interior.ColorIndex == 0) = operators simply assign right operand to the left variable/property/indexer and returns the value as its result. That's why when you write if (row.Cells.EntireRow.Interior.ColorIndex = 0) it ...


3

That's because the datatype of the object is System.DBNull. You should check for a object value type and act accordingly: object objValue = row.Cells.EntireRow.Interior.ColorIndex; if(objValue is System.DBNull) { // } else { // }


3

Try this: setBorder( rangeToBottomBorderize.Borders[_xlApp.XlBordersIndex.xlEdgeBottom], XlBorderWeight.xlThick ); Helper function: private static void setBorder( Border border, XlBorderWeight borderWeight ) { border.LineStyle = XlLineStyle.xlContinuous; border.ColorIndex = XlConstants.xlAutomatic; border.TintAndShade = 0; ...


3

You've already got the solution but instead of giving you a fish for a day I'll give you a proper answer that will help you with any C# Excel coding task. The C# Interop Model for Excel is almost identical to the VBA Excel Model. This means its trivial to convert VBA recorded macro's to C#. Lets try this with an exercise like moving a chart to a different ...


3

Libraries that allow you to read and write Excel-compatible files are, like most libraries, "headless". The code in them can be used to write data in a format that Excel (and compatible applications) understand, but they generally do not offer a (link to a) user interface, nor a way to render the contents of the Excel file to another file format or a ...


3

The MSDN Docs give an example using VSTO and I've adapted this to work with a Winform application. The trick (in this situation) is to reference the PIA see the tooltip path of the Excel Reference in the screenshot below. NOTE: I didn't use the .Net or COM reference tabs, I had to "Browse" for the Excel DLL. Below is the Winform Code of a working example ...


3

Consider using Open XML SDK if you deal with open XML files only. Or you may consider using any other commercial components designed for the server-side execution. Microsoft does not currently recommend, and does not support, Automation of Microsoft Office applications from any unattended, non-interactive client application or component (including ASP, ...


2

What you are looking for is this: worksheet.Range("K1:K100").WrapText = True; That code, for example, will set the cells from K1 to K100 to wrap the contents inside their cells.


2

You were close, use 'Name', not 'name': Application.ActiveSheet.Name="myName";


2

Use Project > Properties > References. Locate and select the "Microsoft Excel xx.x Object Library" entry. In the Properties window, set the Embed Interop Types property to False. Use Build > Rebuild to rebuild your app. It will now work the way you expected. Briefly, this option is a strong optimization for COM interop libraries, like ...


2

Try this as it worked for me... Go to "Start" -> "Run" and enter "dcomcnfg" This will bring up the component services window, expand out "Console Root" -> "Computers" -> "DCOM Config" Find "Microsoft Excel Application" in the list of components. Right click on the entry and select "Properties" Go to the "Identity" tab on the properties dialog. Select ...


2

Well, the shallowest answer is quite simple - when arrays were added to the language, there were no generics. Now, every array is derived from the type Array - however, without generics (which weren't available), there would be no way to implement type safety, not to mention the performance implications. So instead, arrays are somewhere between a primitive ...


2

Check out the Remarks here : https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.office.interop.excel.range.range.aspx. With the Range property the cells are relative to the defined range, hence the shift by 1.


2

First of all, add the following using directive to the top of your file: using Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel; Assuming your column headers are in row 1, you could use the following method: static void DeleteColumnIfEmpty(Worksheet wkst, int colNo) { for (int i = 2; i <= wkst.UsedRange.Rows.Count; i++) { if (wkst.Cells[i, colNo].Value2 ...


2

You never need to call Marshal.ReleaseComObject in this context. The runtime is perfectly able to keep track of COM objects and release them when they are no longer referenced. Calling Marshal.ReleaseComObject is a confusing anti-pattern that sadly even some Microsoft documentation mistakenly suggests. In your case, this means those calls in appCleanup ...


2

Try this: Range cell = (Range)sheet.Cells[1, 1]; Comment comment = cell.AddComment("blah"); comment.Shape.TextFrame.AutoSize = true; Edit: Longer text and different methods: string text = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit,\n sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.\n"+ ...


2

I know this is an old post, but I've been dealing with the same problem. I receive .xlsx files that already have green triangles denoting "Number as Text" errors. I couldn't find a way to programmatically run the Excel error-checking command "Convert to Number" that you can do by clicking in Excel, and changing the NumberFormat on cells with these errors ...


2

You have to check if the type of Shape is msoTextBox before setting text. Excel.Worksheet xlWorkSheet foreach (Excel.Shape shp in xlworksheet.Shapes) { if (shp.Type == Microsoft.Office.Core.MsoShapeType.msoTextBox) { shp.TextFrame.Characters(Type.Missing, Type.Missing).Text = "Test"; } }


2

No, you cannot "view source" on an Excel spreadsheet. However, you can open up the VBA editor and see what code has been written into it. In modern versions of Excel, how to do so might not be so apparent. Up at the top of the Excel window, look for the small arrow, click it, and a drop-down will appear. Toward the bottom of the list, you will see an ...


2

Tim got it almost right, but strictly speaking, the problem is not exactly related to a wrong use of UsedRange, but to the insertions that happen later, which affect an already assigned range variable. You first assign: Excel.Range cells = worksheet.UsedRange; At this moment, cells[1, 1] is A1, because the latter is actually the first used cell. But when ...


2

I would use a iterative algorithm, which will support columns beyond ZZ which you find in recent versions of Excel. private const string Alphabet = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"; public string GetColumnName(int columnIndex) { if (columnIndex < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("columnIndex", columnIndex, "Column index index may ...


2

From the MSDN documentation here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.office.tools.excel.chart.location.aspx it states that for the Name parameter of type object: Name Type: System.Object The name of the sheet where the chart is embedded if Where is xlLocationAsObject or the name of the new sheet if Where is xlLocationAsNewSheet. This is ...


2

You can use this format sheet.Range("A1:A2,B2:B3,C3:C4"). Pay attention that sheet should be of type dynamic so don't use Worksheet class for this purpose. Example Set the specified range background color to red: var range = sheet.Range("A1:A2,B2:B3,C3:C4"); range.Interior.Color = System.Drawing.ColorTranslator.ToOle(System.Drawing.Color.Red);


2

The answer to your question can be found in the documentation of the Template parameter on the Workbook.Add method. [...] If this argument is omitted, Microsoft Excel creates a new workbook with a number of blank sheets (the number of sheets is set by the SheetsInNewWorkbook property). Your code is omitting it, therefore it is creating a single ...


2

You don't need to add Environment.NewLine between words, you can simply use space between words and wrap the content of column, and based on column width, it will show in multiple lines. In the below code, I set all cells in the range to wrap text and to be vertically and horizontally centered. Also just for test I set the column width of 5th column. ...



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