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7

The issue isn't the lambda expression, it's the interface it's implementing. Remember, a lambda expression is basically just shorthand for an anonymous class that implements a given interface. In this case, forEach takes a java.util.function.Consumer<T>: public interface Consumer<T> { void accept(T t); ... } Note that accept is not ...


7

Yes, you have to catch the exceptions and hopefully translate them into something useful. Letting exceptions propagate through C code leads to undefined behavior. At best you cannot expect the C code to maintain consistent program state. See this answer for an easy example. A harder example is with some complex piece of software such as SQLite - C code will ...


5

I would gravely doubt the sanity of any testing code which ignores exceptions thrown from tested code. That said, and assuming that you know what you are doing... there is no way to fundamentally ignore a thrown exception. The best that you can do is minimize the boilerplate you need to wrap the exception-throwing code in. If you are on Java 8, you can use ...


4

It seems that your read method throws IOException. The signature of IntStream.forEach is forEach(IntConsumer action), where IntConsumer has a void accept(int value) method. In that context your lambda expression i -> someList.add(read(istream)) is equivalent to: public class IntConsumerImplementation implements IntConsumer { ObjectInputStream ...


4

I think the culprit lies within InternalRealCall method of ExceptionWrapper. More specifically the following part where we have Action delegates special cased. Action action = callback as Action; if (action != null) { action(); } else { // ... removed code .. obj = callback.DynamicInvoke(); } Since Action delegates are called directly the ...


4

The better way would be to do this: import sys def func(): do_actual_processing() if not successful: raise Exception("Yadayada") if __name__ == '__main__' try: func() except Exception as e: sys.exit(1) That is, the function itself does not need to be concerned with whether or not it is run from command line.


3

The HttpResponseException class has two constructors defined, both of which require a value: HttpResponseException(HttpResponseMessage) HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode) Because your ApiExceptions class inherits from HttpResponseException, it has to provide a compatible constructor. As all the class does is return the HttpResponseException, it ...


3

Change the way you annotate your controller from @Controller to @ControllerAdvice that will make it a global exception handler the docs say The default behavior (i.e. if used without any selector), the @ControllerAdvice annotated class will assist all known Controllers. Also, you would have to change your method to something like ...


3

sharptooth answered most of your question, and James McNellis has written a nice blog post about how to elegantly get rid of the boilerplate using modern C++. The gist of it is having a translate_exceptions function used like this: int callback(...) { return translate_exceptions([&]{ // ... your code here }); } The translate_exception is ...


2

If the method that throws this exception doesn't handle it (i.e. it doesn't catch it), it must declare it in the throws clause, since this is a checked exception. public void yourMethod () throws UserException { ... throw new UserException("Something failed.", new Throwable(String.valueOf(UserExceptionType.CaptureFailed))); ... }


2

I found the answer in ARMv7-M Architecture Reference Manual, section Vector Table Definition(B1.5.3): The Vector table must be naturally aligned to a power of two whose alignment value is greater than or equal to (Number of Exceptions supported x 4), with a minimum alignment of 128 bytes. On power-on or reset, the processor uses the entry at ...


2

You should either declare your methods as throws UserException - or make your exception extend RuntimeException. The later is officially unadvised, but is often used to bypass the java's declared exception mechanism.


2

In addition to Eran's answer, you could also make your custom Exception extend RuntimeException, which does not need to be caught.


2

Throw an additional try/catch around each of the boolean.parse methods, then have the catch just be: try { XmlNode db = _xml.SelectSingleNode("root/database"); string usr = db.SelectSingleNode("username").InnerText; string psw = db.SelectSingleNode("password").InnerText; string srvr = db.SelectSingleNode("server").InnerText; string dbn ...


2

You can use Python's traceback module to format an exception. from traceback import format_exception def excepthook(self, type_, value, traceback): print format_exception(type_, value, traceback) sys.excepthook = self.excepthook Check out the official documentation for more information and examples.


2

2. If something fail it enter into the catch block that instead of exit throws a custom exception that goes back until the main() method that perform: If you are handling exceptions in main() then you have to have error handling code at the parent level. If there's any change there's no need to check other functions, you just need to add the through ...


2

You should simply throw a UserException : UserException is the base class for exceptions that are meant to be shown to end users. Read more : http://www.yiiframework.com/doc-2.0/yii-base-userexception.html


1

As you probably know already, calling raise inside a rescue block will raise the exception to the caller. Since Timeout::Error is an Interrupt in ruby 1.8*, the timeout exception raised by net_http gets handled in the rescue SystemExit, Interrupt block rather than in the following rescue Exception => e. To verify that Timeout::Error is an Interrupt, just ...


1

The problem is that you can't throw a reference. Throw needs a real copy of the object. The copy is slicing the reference to the type at the point of the throw. I'm not aware of a workaround to this problem.


1

the following code should works : base(...) If you omit the call to a base constructor it will call the default base constructor automatically and HttpResponseException doesn't have without arguments. public class ApiExceptions : HttpResponseException { public ApiExceptions(string reason, HttpStatusCode code):base(code) ...


1

try to use this...with the AppName like this:- MyAppName::Application.config.middleware.use ExceptionNotification::Rack, :email => { :email_prefix => "[MyApp_Error] ", :sender_address => %{"notifier" <notifier@myAppName.com>}, :exception_recipients => %w{your_email_id@gmail.com} }


1

You are using inconsistent attribute names. You are handling your exceptions just fine, you simply have the names mixed up. Two of your exceptions use lineNumber as the attribute: class UnknownCommandException(Exception): """this exception is thrown when a nonexistant command is used.""" def __init__(self, inst, line): self.inst = inst ...


1

What about using TryParse. The TryParse method is like the Parse method, except the TryParse method does not throw an exception if the conversion fails. So you can simply check for failure with the returning Boolean value bool clean_db; if(!Boolean.TryParse(db.Attributes["clean"].Value),out clean_db) { // Failled } bool functions; ...


1

In Java, when you throw a checked Exception, there is one more thing you are required to do: 1. Either add a try-catch block around the throw and handle this Exception within the same method. 2. Or add a throws statement to the method definition, transferring the responsibility for the handling of the the Exception to a higher-level method. This is part ...


1

if your Custom Exception extends from Exception class, it must be handled (using try-catch) or passed on to caller (using throws). If you just want to leave it to runtime to handle the exception, You need to extend it from RuntimeException Class Since its the 1st case in your scenario, You should do something like this: public void surroundingMethod() ...


1

Is there any way to catch my exceptions before the 3rd party library does? HandlerFunction() { try { /* place handler body here */ } catch(Exception e) { /* you may store/log the exception object here */ } } ThirdPartyObject.Event += HandlerFunction; In the catch clause, you may also add your exception object to ...


1

This is just a simple demonstration based on your inputs in the question. Better go for BULK processing and SQL%BULK_EXCEPTIONS. And don't use WHEN OTHERS blindly. Let's say you have an EMP table, and you have a check constraint on employee name as not more than 5 characters. There is an EMP_ERR table to log the error values and error message. Lets see a ...


1

1) I guess you want something like this: html file: <script> try{ </script> <script src='two.js'></script> <script> }catch(e){ console.log(e); } </script> one.js: throw "not a number"; This is not possible, and the reason is well explained by jfriend00: When an external script (e.g. one that loads from ...


1

You can't ignore exception in Java. If a method declares being able to throw something this is because something important can't be done, and the error can't be corrected by the method designer. So if you really wan't to simplify your life encapsulate the method call in some other method like this : class MyExceptionFreeClass { public static void ...


1

Unfortunately no, there isn't, and this is by intention. When used correctly, exceptions should not be ignored as they indicate that something didn't work and that you probably shouldn't continue down your normal execution path. Completely ignoring exceptions is an example of the 'Sweep it under the rug' anti-pattern, which is why the language doesn't ...



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