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5

If each lookup is a separate function, you can store all the functions in a list and then iterate over them one by one. lookups = [ look_in_first_place, look_in_second_place, look_in_third_place ] info = None for lookup in lookups: try: info = lookup() # exit the loop on success break except AttributeError: ...


4

You can use both the ways of writing try,catch and finally and it varies from situation to situation. Consider the following code listing for try...except inside try...finally. //You will receive a DataSet is some state. try try //Here you'll change its state and perform operations on it. //If some exception occurred you will handle it. ...


4

You can't really do this cleanly -- Either the context manager swallows the exception or it doesn't. If you're OK with the exception propagating out of the manager (which you should be if you're handling arbitrary exceptions here), you can monkey-patch the exception instance: def __exit__(self, type, value, trace): if type: if not ...


4

This auto-generated code is rather unfortunate, the common wisdom is to not subscribe any unhandled exception handler when a debugger is attached. Since that prevents the debugger from showing you what is going wrong at the moment it goes wrong. Especially painful in async code since the code that threw the exception is not visible on the call stack. It ...


3

You could use a proxy class to perform the calls on your behalf and let you wrap the exception: class GenericProxy { private $obj; private $handler; public function __construct($target, callable $exceptionHandler = null) { $this->obj = $target; $this->handler = $exceptionHandler; } public function ...


2

Try this foreach (Object attributes in type.GetCustomAttributes(false)) { DeBugInfo dbi = attributes as DeBugInfo; if (null != dbi) { ..... Use same for method attributes.


2

Only if your catch statement throws to another try/catch, for example: try{ ... try{ ... } catch(ExceptionA a) { throw; } catch(Exception e) { //will not not catch ExceptionA (rethrow or not) } } catch(ExceptionA a) { //this would catch the re-throw } catch( Exception e) { } Instead why don't you ...


1

Sounds to me like you want to change a function's behaviour based on whether you are calling said function from a try block or not. Why not simply define your functions as def my_func(param0, param1, called_from_try_block=False): pass Then can call your function like so: my_func(4, 2) try: my_func(4, 2, True) except: pass


1

If RangeError inherits from ValueError, then you will be able to catch it by catching ValueError: >>> class RangeError(ValueError): ... pass ... >>> try: ... raise RangeError ... except ValueError: ... print("handler for ValueError") ... handler for ValueError >>> >>> try: ... raise RangeError ... except ...


1

This is why fire-and-forget tasks are generally a bad idea. They're even worse of an idea in your case since you're not wrapping your adding inside a try/catch with records.CompleteAdding inside the finally block meaning that the call to MoveNext on the enumerator from your GetConsumingEnumerable will eventually block indefinitely - that's bad bad bad. If ...


1

I believe the difference is which method Powershell is calling to get the output from the object in different circumstances. When you just output it to the pipeline by using $error[0].exception.innerexception it's calling the .GetBaseException() method, which just outputs the Message property. When you cast it as [string] to use with Write-Host, it's ...


1

this? "$($Error[0].Exception.InnerException.message): $computername" The behaviour you have IMHO is due to the custom formatting file


1

The instruction that caused the fault is executed again. The idea is that the handler should make appropriate changes so that the instruction will be able to execute properly. For instance, if an instruction causes a page fault because it tries to access virtual memory that's paged out, the OS will load the page from backing store, update the page table, ...


1

This should do it. It will check if m_SelectedPayabes.PBLE.PAYABLEID that matches m_Payables.PBLE.PAYABLEID and select m_Payables that do. if (m_SelectedPayabes!= null && m_Payables!=null){ var x = m_Payables.Where(o => m_SelectedPayabes.Any(oo => oo.PBLE!=null && oo.PBLE.PAYABLEID == o.PBLE.PAYABLEID)); }


1

You can add following code before your query: if (m_SelectedPayabes == null) m_SelectedPayabes = new List<...>(); or surrounf whole query with the proper condition like: if (m_SelectedPayabes != null) { // your query }


1

The caller gets no additional semantic information about what error occurred, nor why it occurred. Did they pass bad input? In that case, give them a client-focused error (which will translate better across RPC or some other kind of remote-invocation). Did some dependent upstream service go away? Throw a semantic exception so that the caller can provide ...


1

You can add a error_handled attribute to the exception and test for it: class Test(object): def __enter__(self): pass def __exit__(self,type,value,trace): if type: if not getattr(value,'error_handled', False): value.error_handled = True print "Error occured: " + str(value.args) with ...


1

I hope my code helps. for those messages, you can delete them, they are here purely to help you see where it shows waring or error. setwd("D:/Dropbox/Test/"); outputdir = "D:/Dropbox/Test/" output_names_hdf5_list=c("simulation-results fL=0.1,fks=1,fno=1.05,fnc=1.05,fr=1.05,fs=1.05.hdf5", "simulation-results ...



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