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921

Enclose in parentheses: except (IDontLIkeYouException, YouAreBeingMeanException) as e: pass Separating the exception from the variable with a comma will still work in Python 2.6 and 2.7, but is now deprecated and does not work in Python 3; now you should be using as.


735

Catch System.Exception and switch on the types catch (Exception ex) { if (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException) { WebId = Guid.Empty; return; } throw; }


562

Everybody who is anti-goto cites, directly or indirectly, Edsger Dijkstra's GoTo Considered Harmful article to substantiate their position. Too bad Dijkstra's article has virtually nothing to do with the way goto statements are used these days and thus what the article says has little to no applicability to the modern programming scene. The goto-less meme ...


548

Exception is the root of Ruby's exception hierarchy, so when you rescue Exception you rescue from everything, including subclasses such as SyntaxError, LoadError, and Interrupt. Rescuing Interrupt prevents the user from using CTRLC to exit the program. Rescuing SignalException prevents the program from responding correctly to signals. It will be unkillable ...


462

Yes, ensure ensures that the code is always evaluated. That's why it's called ensure. So, it is equivalent to Java's and C#'s finally. The general flow of begin/rescue/else/ensure/end looks like this: begin # something which might raise an exception rescue SomeExceptionClass => some_variable # code that deals with some exception rescue ...


351

Your question makes an assertion, that "Writing exception safe code is very hard". I will answer your questions first, and then, answer the hidden question behind them. Answering questions Do you really write exception safe code? Of course I do. This is the reason Java lost a lot of its appeal to me as a C++ programmer (lack of RAII semantics), but I ...


338

expect { some_method }.to raise_error RSpec 1 Syntax: lambda { some_method }.should raise_error See the documentation (for RSpec 1 syntax) and RSpec 2 documentation for more.


338

You should always use following syntax to rethrow an exception, else you'll stomp the stack trace: throw; If you print the trace resulting from "throw ex", you'll see that it ends on that statement and not at the real source of the exception. Basically, it should be deemed a criminal offense to use "throw ex".


337

The statements in the else block are executed if execution falls off the bottom of the try - if there was no exception. Honestly, I've never found a need. However, Handling Exceptions notes: The use of the else clause is better than adding additional code to the try clause because it avoids accidentally catching an exception that wasn’t raised ...


312

Update: Joyent now has their own guide mentioned in this answer. The following information is more of a summary: Safely "throwing" errors Ideally we'd like to avoid uncaught errors as much as possible, as such, instead of literally throwing the error, we can instead safely "throw" the error using one of the following methods depending on our code ...


287

It looks like it's not that null is treated as a NullPointerException, but that the act of attempting to throw null itself throws a NullPointerException. In other words, throw checks that its argument is nonnull, and if it is null, it throws a NullPointerException. JLS 14.18 specifies this behavior: If evaluation of the Expression completes normally, ...


245

I haven't tried this, so I don't know if the JVM would restrict something like this, but maybe you could compile code which throws ChuckNorrisException, but at runtime provide a class definition of ChuckNorrisException which does not extend Throwable. UPDATE: It doesn't work. It generates a verifier error: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError: ...


228

Yes, there is a difference; throw ex resets the stack trace (so your errors would appear to originate from HandleException) throw doesn't - the original offender would be preserved.


222

The main problem here is that it ignores all and any error: Out of memory, CPU is burning, user wants to stop, program wants to exit, Jabberwocky is killing users. This is way too much. In your head, you're thinking "I want to ignore this network error". If something unexpected goes wrong, then your code silently continues and breaks in completely ...


221

The big difference is that try...catch will swallow the exception, hiding the fact that an error occurred. try..finally will run your cleanup code and then the exception will keep going, to be handled by something that knows what to do with it.


217

You can trap unhandled exceptions at different levels: AppDomain.UnhandledException From all threads in the AppDomain. Dispatcher.UnhandledException From a single specific UI dispatcher thread. Application.DispatcherUnhandledException From the main UI dispatcher thread in your WPF application. TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException from within each ...


217

Direct log writing method, working since ELMAH 1.0: try { some code } catch(Exception ex) { Elmah.ErrorLog.GetDefault(HttpContext.Current).Log(new Elmah.Error(ex)); } ELMAH 1.2 introduces a more flexible API: try { some code } catch(Exception ex) { Elmah.ErrorSignal.FromCurrentContext().Raise(ex); } There is a difference between the ...


207

If a finally block throws an exception what exactly happens ? That exception propagates out and up, and will (can) be handled at a higher level. Your finally block will not be completed beyond the point where the exception is thrown. If the finally block was executing during the handling of another exception, then that first exception is lost. ...


202

A method should only catch an exception when it can handle it in some sensible way. Otherwise, pass it on up, in the hope that a method higher up the call stack can make sense of it. As others have noted, it is good practice to have an unhandled exception handler (with logging) at the highest level of the call stack to ensure that any fatal errors are ...


199

Usually empty try-catch is a bad idea because you are silently swallowing an error condition and then continuing execution. Occasionally this may be the right thing to do, but often it's a sign that a developer saw an exception, didn't know what to do about it, and so used an empty catch to silence the problem. It's the programming equivalent of putting ...


184

Step 1: check the return code: if($content === FALSE) { // handle error here... } Step 2: suppress the warning by putting an @ in front of the file_get_contents: $content = @file_get_contents($site);


176

It depends how exceptions are implemented. The simplest way is using setjmp and longjmp. That means all registers of the CPU are written to the stack (which already takes some time) and possibly some other data needs to be created... all this already happens in the try statement. The throw statement needs to unwind the stack and restore the values of all ...


172

First; the way that the code in the article does it is evil. throw ex will reset the call stack in the exception to the point where this throw statement is; losing the information about where the exception actually was created. Second, if you just catch and re-throw like that, I see no added value, the code example above would be just as good (or, given the ...


165

From: http://www.webreference.com/programming/javascript/rg32/2.html throw { name: "System Error", level: "Show Stopper", message: "Error detected. Please contact the system administrator.", htmlMessage: "Error detected. Please contact the <a href=\"mailto:sysadmin@acme-widgets.com\">system ...


165

traceback.format_exc() or sys.exc_info() will yield more info if thats what you want. import traceback import sys try: do_stuff() except Exception, err: print traceback.format_exc() #or print sys.exc_info()[0]


162

The finally statement is executed, but the return value isn't affected. The execution order is: Code before return statement is executed Expression in return statement is evaluated finally block is executed Result evaluated in step 2 is returned Here's a short program to demonstrate: using System; class Test { static string x; static void ...


161

The code inside a finally block will get executed regardless of whether or not there is an exception. This comes in very handy when it comes to certain housekeeping functions you need to always run like closing connections. Now, I'm guessing your question is why you should do this: try { doSomething(); } catch { catchSomething(); } finally { ...


156

See the traceback module, specifically the format_exc() function. Here. import traceback try: raise ValueError except: tb = traceback.format_exc() else: tb = "No error" finally: print tb


147

There are a few reasons for using the "goto" statement that I'm aware of (some have spoken to this already): Cleanly exiting a function Often in a function, you may allocate resources and need to exit in multiple places. Programmers can simplify their code by putting the resource cleanup code at the end of the function, and all "exit points" of the ...


144

Parameters and local variables are allocated on the stack (with reference types the object lives on the heap and a variable references that object). The stack typically lives at the upper end of your address space and as it is used up it heads towards the bottom of the address space (i.e. towards zero). Your process also has a heap, which lives at the ...



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