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14

throw without an argument should only be used inside a catch statement, to rethrow the caught exception object. You code tries to use it outside the catch statement - instead you should pick a type to throw, if in doubt it's not unreasonable to start with std::runtime_error. For more options, see here. You can also throw your own types, but it's usually a ...


13

You are right when you say that catching Throwable is not a good idea. However, the code that you present in your question is not catching Throwable in an evil way but let's talk about that later. For now, the code that you present in your question has several advantages : 1. Readability If you look at the code carefully, you will notice that even though ...


10

Store the task in a variable: var task = OperationThatMayCompleteSynchronously(parameter); //may throw Then await it: await task; //may throw That way you can differentiate between the two origins for a potential exception. Note, that async methods never throw directly. They pass exceptions through the task they return. This is true even for ...


10

There are various reasons why you should not catch a Throwable. First of all is, that Throwable includes Errors - and there's normally not much an application can do if one of these appears. Also Throwable reduces your chances of finding out, WHAT has happened. All you get is "something bad has happened" - which might be a catastrophe or just a nuisance. ...


9

Windows batch scripting certainly does not have any formal exception handling - hardly surprising considering how primitive the language is. Never in my wildest dreams did I ever think effective exception handling could be hacked up. But then some amazing discoveries were made on a Russian site concerning the behavior of an erroneous GOTO statement (I have ...


8

Catching Throwables out of laziness is a bad idea. This was particularly tempting before try-multi-catch was introduced. try { ... } catch (SomeException e) { //do something } catch (OtherException e) { //do the same thing } ... Repeating catch blocks is tedious and verbose, so some people decided to just catch Exception or Throwable and be done ...


6

There's nothing inherently wrong with throwing an exception with a catch statement. However there are a couple of things to bear in mind: Rethrow the exception using "throw" not "throw ex", otherwise you will loose the stack trace. From Creating and Throwing Exceptions. Do not throw System.Exception, System.SystemException, ...


6

Try to disable FPU exceptions on startup: Set8087CW($133F); Or (for modern Delphi) Math.SetExceptionMask(exAllArithmeticExceptions);


5

So the question is: "What happens when I throw outside a catch block?" The answer to this can be found in its documentation: Rethrows the currently handled exception. Abandons the execution of the current catch block and passes control to the next matching exception handler (but not to another catch clause after the same try block: its compound-statement ...


5

Create a custom service layer specific runtime exception which is annotated with @ApplicationException with rollback=true. @ApplicationException(rollback=true) public abstract class ServiceException extends RuntimeException {} Create some concrete subclasses for general business exceptions, such as constraint violation, required entity, and of course ...


5

You can use fromTry: val x = slowAsync(1) flatMap (s => Future.fromTry(mayFail(s)))


5

It's the conventional way prior to C# 6.0 (other than maybe catching a more specific exception type). In C# 6.0 you can add exception filters: catch (Exception ex) if (ex.Message.Contains("The underlying connection was closed")) { //correction routine } There may be safer means than checking the message, however. Look at the ErrorCode and see if ...


5

An exception thrown from the finally block will replace any exception that was thrown from the try, and information about the real problem is likely to be lost. Since the try-finally block is allowed to throw an IOException in this case, here's a better way to write it: try (BufferedReader bufferedReader = Files.newBufferedReader(Paths.get("file.txt"))) { ...


4

Yes, it's perfectly fine to use standard exception classes for your own purposes. If they fit your situation well, go ahead (but don't hesitate to define your own class when/if no standard class fits well). Also note that you can derive from the standard classes, so if you can add significantly greater precision or new behavior that isn't present in the ...


4

I think that "let it crash" has often been misinterpreted as "do not handle errors" (a much stronger and stranger suggestion). And the answer to your question ("should I handle errors or not") is "it depends". One concern with error handling is the user experience. You're never going to want to throw a stack trace an supervision tree at you users. Another ...


4

It is quite common to use try: ... except Exception: ... blocks. If GeneratorExit would inherit from Exception you would get the following issue: def get_next_element(alist): for element in alist: try: yield element except BaseException: # except Exception pass for element in ...


4

You can chain-together using the actual types of the exception: try { } catch(SpecificExceptionType e) //System.Net.WebException in your case, I think { //Specific exception } catch(Exception e) { //Everything else }


4

Don't try to reinvent the wheel with regards to exceptions. There is one and only one scenario in which you should catch an exception: Catch an exception if you have an alternative plan what to do with it. An exception means that your code encountered an exceptional condition in which it cannot continue its work and has no choice but to throw in the towel. ...


4

The standard exception hierarchy is unsuitable for logic errors. Use an assert and be done with it. If you absolutely do want to transform hard bugs into harder to detect run time errors, then note that there are only two reasonable things a handler can do: achieve the contractual goal in some possibly different way (possibly just retrying the operation), or ...


3

Here is a summarized list of suggestions I curated from other great answers: Catch all unhandled exceptions. Create an ExceptionHandler that implements java.lang.Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler. You can use this class to customize and log errors. Put this: Thread.setDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler(new UncaughtExceptionHandler(this)); inside OnCreate() ...


3

Since you are catching the exception in the code the compiler shows that missing return statement error. You can implement the function Like this : public T front() throws Exception { if(isEmpty()) { throw new Exception("Queue is Empty- can't return Front element."); } return arrayList.get(frontIndex); } and finally handle the ...


3

Your decode_message is not the only point of failure. contact_host can most likely fail too, but you are either ignoring the error tuple or handling that failure in your tcp_client implementation. That aside, you approach to error handling would work provided that your udp_listener is started by a supervisor with the correct strategy. If Data is not exactly ...


3

The correct way to capture signals is with Signal.trap: Signal.trap('QUIT') do puts "Shutting down..." exit end Signal.trap('INT', 'IGNORE') The linked docs have some comments on OS differences, specifically: The list of available signal names and their interpretation is system dependent. Signal delivery semantics may also vary between systems; ...


3

When you use try and finally without try-with-resources, when something goes wrong in a try block, you get an exception thrown, then the finally is executed, and if an exception gets thrown during the finally block then the exception thrown by the finally masks the exception thrown by the try block. "Exception-masking" is where the JVM chooses that the ...


3

With EF6 and the DbContext API (for SQL Server), I'm currently using this piece of code: try { // Some DB access } catch (Exception ex) { HandleException(ex); } public virtual void HandleException(Exception exception) { DbUpdateConcurrencyException concurrencyEx = exception as DbUpdateConcurrencyException; if (concurrencyEx != null) { ...


3

You posted a link to Jongo, which demonstrates one possible use for this technique: re-using error handling code. Let's say you've got a large block of error handling code that naturally repeats itself in various places in your code - for example Jongo produces standard responses for some standard classes of errors. It may be a good idea to extract that ...


3

The difference in the two cases is simply that in the first one, it is possible for the implementation to check if there is an error in the parameter passed, while in the second one it is impossible (there is no way of checking which is the length of the string, since only a pointer is passed). So the general rule could be the following: If possibile, ...


3

Okay, I figured out what is happening here: elif self.fake.get("blah", ''): print '2' This is the problematic line. self.fake is None, so running None.get('blah') raises an AttributeError. However, since this is inside a property, python treats this as if the property does not exist, and so in turn calls __getattr__, which does not print anything


3

you mean as opposed to this? def zip2(*iterables): # zip('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax By iterators = [iter(it) for it in iterables] while iterators: result = [] for it in iterators: try: elem = next(it) except StopIteration: return result.append(elem) yield ...


3

There is no best way of logging. It always depends on what you need. But if you want to reduce code and just log the error, you could create your own event handler and attach it to a specific event. Take the for example the AppDomain.UnhandledException event: Demo code from MSDN: public class Example { [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.Demand, ...



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