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80

Main issue of RWH It's old. RWH was written at a time version 6.8 of GHC was being used. 6.8 used base version 3.0.x.x. 6.10.1 already used 4.0.0.0, which introduced many changes. And that's just the jump from 6.8 to 6.10. The current version of GHC is 7.8, and the upcoming 7.10 will change monads significantly (see below). That being said, it's still a ...


61

Exception is the base type for all exceptions, and as such terribly unspecific. You shouldn’t ever throw this exception because it simply does not contain any useful information. Calling code catching for exceptions couldn’t disambiguate the intentionally thrown exception (from your logic) from other system exceptions that are entirely undesired and point ...


39

You could make use of Extension methods here. Create an extension method in a new class. public static class ExtensionMethods { public static void Log(this Exception obj) { // log your Exception here. } } And use it like: try { } catch (Exception obj) { obj.Log(); }


38

Despite what these other answers say, you can catch AError and BError in the same block (it is somewhat easier if you are the one defining the exceptions). Even given that there are exceptions you want to "fall through", you should still be able to define a hierarchy to match your needs. abstract class MyExceptions extends \Exception {} abstract class ...


29

I know I'm a little late to the party here, but holy smoke... Cutting straight to the chase, this kind of duplicates an earlier answer, but if you really want to perform a common action for several exception types and keep the whole thing neat and tidy within the scope of the one method, why not just use a lambda/closure/inline function do something like ...


27

I suspect the intent with the last 2 is to prevent confusion with inbuilt exceptions that have an expected meaning. However, I'm of the opinion that if you are preserving the exact intent of the exception: it is the correct one to throw. For example, if you are writing a custom collection, it seems entirely reasonable to use IndexOutOfRangeException - ...


23

Your idea is correct: The finally block will close the resources even if an unexpected exception ocurred. You are also right that this is irrelevant if such an exception crashes the complete application, but from looking at this code you can't decide if this is the case. There might be other exception handlers, catching that exception, so it is good and ...


21

The reason it is generally advised to not swallow exceptions is that it can hide bugs. For example, you are doing something other than doing a File.Copy: you are doing string processing as well (strFile + ".new"). This cannot throw (except for OOM), but if the calculation was more complex, you might have hidden a bug. In this case you should probably move ...


19

Short answer: Don't do this unless there is some reason that you must. Instead, catch specific exceptions you can deal with at the point you can deal with them, and allow all other exceptions to bubble up the stack. TL;DR answer: It depends what you're writing, what is going to be calling your code, and why you feel that you need to introduce a custom ...


16

Here's the complete solution (almost: I omitted the UI layout and button handling) - derived from a lot of experimentation and various posts from others related to issues that came up along the way. There are a number of things you need to do: Handle uncaughtException in your Application subclass. After catching an exception, start a new activity to ...


16

It is the feature added in Java 7. Have a look at Rethrowing Exceptions with More Inclusive Type Checking


15

You must catch the exception before it escapes the lambda: s = s.filter(a -> try { return a.isActive(); } catch (IOException e) { throw new UncheckedIOException(e); }}); Consider the fact that the lambda isn't evaluated at the place you write it, but at some completely unrelated place, within a JDK class. So that would be the point ...


15

SyntaxError is a perfectly ordinary built-in exception. It is not special in any way. Only the circumstances of when it's (usually) thrown are a bit unusual. A syntax error means that the code featuring said error cannot be parsed. It doesn't even begin to be a valid program, hence it cannot be executed. Therefore SyntaxError exceptions are raised before ...


15

Compile this little program (I realized I should have used your example, but it makes no difference) public static void main(String[] args) { try { Float s = Float.parseFloat("0.0327f"); } finally { System.out.println("hello"); } } I used >java -version java version "1.8.0-ea" // should be same for 7 Java(TM) SE Runtime ...


15

Is there a case which "throw ex" is useful ? Sure - sometimes you want to truncate the stack trace - to avoid exposing implementation details, etc. Other times you may want to throw a new exception, which would mean the compiler would have to distinguish from just re-throwing the caught exception and throwing a new exception. So why would you want the ...


14

Constructors with function try blocks (like what you have for S) automatically rethrow any exceptions caught by the catch block. Consequently, after the catch catches the exception, it rethrows it. This behavior is different from normal catch handlers, which don't do this. I think the rationale is that if construction of a data member or base class fails, ...


14

The is keyword never throws an exception. That is a useless method and you should remove it. if(IsThing(item)) {...} could and should be replaced with if(item is Thing) { ... }


14

Circling back around to answer. I'll start by not answering your question. :-) Does this really work? def f(): try: raise Exception('bananas!') except: pass raise So, what does the above do? Cue Jeopardy music. Alright then, pencils down. # python 3.3 4 except: 5 pass ----> 6 raise 7 ...


13

There is nothing like this in Visual Studio. The main issue is, unlike Java, C# doesn't support anything like the throws clause. As such, there is no way to directly know what possible exceptions a method will raise. The tooling is built around the language feature, which just doesn't exist in C#. Anders Hejlsberg discusses this decision in detail in ...


13

You don't need to put try/catch blocks on every method. That's tedious and painful! Instead you can use the Application_Error event of Global.asax for logging the exceptions. The code below is the sample implementation which can be used to catch exceptions that occur in your web application. protected void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e) { ...


13

I had a similar error, and basically, what was said on the previous comment will resolve your problem yes. If you did trace your error, it would report here: mLocationClient.requestLocationUpdates(REQUEST, this); The reason is that the client isn't connected when you call that API method. And that is why the previous answer works just fine, because ...


12

I would like to know why constructors cant gracefully handle errors ? They can, by throwing an exception if initialisation fails. This is far more "graceful" than the suggestion to leave the object in a half-alive state, to be properly initialised by calling a function later. Used correctly[1], exceptions guarantee that the object is either fully ...


11

The correct way to handle your specific case would be if (myObject != null) { string json = myObject.ToJSONString(); // other logic } else { // handle the situation where myObject is null } Doing this, you're avoiding the exception to trigger.


11

Use RAII. There are many ways to do this, the best would be to use tried and tested solutions such as smart pointers like std::unique_ptr<myClass> or boost::scoped_ptr<myClass>. If you want to go through the exercise of implementing a RAII solution yourself, it could be in the form of a scope guard: struct guard { myClass* ptr; ...


10

What you are trying to do is called a cross-cutting concern. You are trying to log any error that happens anywhere in your code. In ASP.NET MVC cross-cutting concerns can be achieved by using Filters. Filters are attributes that can be applied globally, to a controller or to a method. They run before an action method executes or after it. You have ...


10

Need to use single | operator. Not ||. catch(NumberFormatException | IOException exception)


10

The problem you're having is because you're throwing your exception in pure code: the type of throw is Exception e => e -> a. Exceptions in pure code are imprecise, and do not guarantee ordering with respect to IO operations. So the catch doesn't see the pure throw. To fix that, you can use evaluate :: a -> IO a, which "can be used to order ...


10

It's a bug. When I implemented it for libstdc++ in 2009 the spec in N2619 required E to be a polymorphic type, but the final spec in the 2011 standard is different and the implementation in libstdc++ was never changed.


9

You are already not catching access violations and you never could. Access violations are not C++ exceptions. They are "exceptions" of a different kind — that raised by your operating system. I prefer not to call them "exceptions" at all, in fact. Linux and Linux-like operating systems simply terminate a process (using a signal) that performs an ...


9

Figured it out. I'm not sure why they don't make this a built in report but maybe someday. I made a custom widget in a dashboard with Exception Description for dimension and 'Crashes' for the metric: Which gives me a report like this: You can also go to Customization tab and create a custom report to give you a table of errors, and then add it to your ...



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