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Exception handling is a programming language construct or computer hardware mechanism designed to handle the occurrence of exceptions, special conditions that change the normal flow of program execution.

Exception handling is a programming language construct or computer hardware mechanism designed to handle the occurrence of exceptional conditions (special or unexpected conditions) that change the normal flow of program execution.

When such conditions occur the programmer can decide to "throw" or "raise" an exception. The thrown exception will propagate up the stack until it's "caught" by an appropriate language construct, which usually contains code that deals with the situation. Unhandled exceptions usually lead to a "crash", i.e. abnormal termination.

This term is language- and platform-agnostic.

Automated exception handling is a computing term referring to the computerized handling of errors. Runtime engines such as those for the Java language or Microsoft .NET lend themselves to an automated mode of exception or error handling. In these environments software errors do not "crash" the operating system or the runtime engine but rather generate exceptions. Recent advances in these runtime engines enables specialized runtime-engine add-on products to provide automated exception handling that is independent of the source code and provides root-cause information for every exception of interest.

For exception handling in the context of .NET programs, see

See also .

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