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11

If all you care about is exception-safety of this operation: v.reserve(v.size()+1); // reserve can throw, but that doesn't matter v.push_back(new Foo); // new can throw, that doesn't matter either. The issue of a vector having responsibility for freeing the objects pointed to by its contents is a separate thing, I'm sure you'll get plenty of advice ...


10

Your new way is more exception safe but there is a reason that you don't see it done anywhere else. A vector of pointers only owns the pointers, it doesn't express ownership of the pointed-to objects. You are effectively releasing ownership to an object that doesn't "want" ownership. Most people will use a vector of shared_ptr to express the ownership ...


8

Should I really throw an error when a list fails? Shouldn't I rather simply do nothing and return instead of forcing the user of the list to perform try {] catch() {} statements (that are also slow). Absolutely throw the exception. The user must know what happened if the list was empty - otherwise it will be hell to debug. The user is not forced to use ...


8

When in doubt, check the Java Language Specification. In section 17.1 you'll find: If execution of the method's body is ever completed, either normally or abruptly, an unlock action is automatically performed on that same monitor.


6

I'm not asking about allocateResource throwing an exception, but a situation in which you get an exception after that function has returned, but before resource is assigned. It gets very messy to try to handle this aspect of exception safety, not least because the language constructs don't allow you to install your finally handler in the middle of ...


6

I'm not really sure when exactly I should strive for exception safety vs speed You should always strive for exception safety. Note that "exception safety" doesn't mean, "throwing an exception if anything goes wrong". It means "providing one of the three exception guarantees: weak, strong or nothrow". Throwing exceptions is optional. Exception safety ...


4

There's not a direct translation of the scope guard idiom built into C# or in the BCL, but Alex Rønne Petersen wrote up a blog post with a solution that leverages the IDispoable interface and C#'s using statements to do something similar to what you're looking for.


4

That's a long question. I'll take all the questions that are numbered 1). 1) Should I really throw an error when a list fails? Shouldn't I rather simply do nothing and return instead of forcing the user of the list to perform try {] catch() {} statements (that are also slow). No. If your user cares about performance they will check the length before ...


4

You could do it this way, but you still have to cleanup in the event of an exception not being thrown, which seems a little onerous. If you use something like boost::shared_ptr (I believe something like this is in TR1 libraries as well - as an example see MS's implementation) you could forget about having to cleanup in the event of things going as ...


4

In general, using std::auto_ptr as a type of function argument unambiguously tells the caller that function will take ownership of the object, and will be responsible for deleting it. If your function fits that description, then by all means use auto_ptr there regardless of any other reason.


3

The preferred way to do this is to use a container of smart pointers, for example, a std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Foo> > or a std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Foo> > (shared_ptr can be found in Boost and C++ TR1 as well; std::unique_ptr is effectively restricted to C++0x). Another option is to use a container that owns dynamic objects, ...


3

Of course, not every type is move-enabled and C++0x even allows throwing move constructors. As long as constructing the object from an rvalue may throw it cannot be exception-safe. However, move semantics allows you to have many types that are nothrow-constructible given an rvalue source. Conditional support for this could be done with SFINAE. But even ...


3

Generally speaking, the C++ standard does not modify any of the functions from the C standard, except to decree the identifiers should refer to actual functions rather than macros. Thus, functions from the C standard library cannot throw an exception in any circumstance there the C standard decrees what a function can do. Loopholes that would allow ...


3

While reading, I wondered that do C library functions throw exception in C++ ? Not if you use the functions correctly. How could they? That would completely break backward compatibility. However, if you use them incorrectly, undefined behaviour occurs. And in that case, a compiler can do anything it wants, including the throwing of exceptions. For ...


3

So, is it OK to have a potentially throwing swap member function if you can't help it? (Or do you know ways around this conundrum?) There is nothing inherently wrong with having a swap function that can potentially throw, but beware that without the strong exception guarantee in swap, it cannot possibly be used to provide exception safety, that is, it ...


3

Your example is safe the way you've written it. However, you could make it even more leak-proof by having your factory method createFoo() return an auto pointer instead of a raw pointer. That way you are guaranteed that there will be no leaks. So what you'd get is: #include <memory> #include <tr1/memory> std::auto_ptr<Foo> createFoo() { ...


3

The point is to have all the code that can throw exception inside the try block. In your case: try { resource = allocateResource(); //... } finally { free(resource); } Otherwise - no, of course its not safe.


3

It is not safe to reuse the object. For such a question I would always look into a source, that is the reason it is open. So if you look into that one: http://kickjava.com/src/java/net/ServerSocket.java.htm you notice that in accept() a SocketException (inherits from IOException) is thrown if the socket is closed or not bound anymore. Both states indicate ...


3

Synchronize is neither thread-safe nor non-thread-safe. The way you phrased the question just doesn't make sense. In case of an exception the lock will be released.


2

In the case of C# it is considered unsafe, because a ThreadAbortException can be thrown between the resource allocation and the beginning of the try block. For this reason, C#4 changes the expansion of a using block to move the resource allocation inside the try, and the finally block uses a hidden boolean (or tests against null—I can’t remember exactly) to ...


2

The example is safe: if the shared_ptr constructor throws an exception, it delete's its pointer argument before throwing (draft standard, 20.9.11.2.1). Whether create should return a shared_ptr depends on what its clients may reasonably want to do with its result. If all they ever do is wrap it in a shared_ptr, then return that for extra safety. (Yes, ...


2

There's nothing inherently wrong with a throwing swap, it is just less useful than a no-throw version. The copy and swap idiom doesn't need swap to be no-throw in order to provide the strong exception guarantee. swap needs only to provide the strong exception guarantee. The difficulty is that if the no-throw guarantee cannot be provided, it is also likely ...


2

I hear often that anything can fail in a C++ program. Is it realistic to test if the constructor for ListElem fails (or tail_ during newing)? Yes, it is realistic. Otherwise, if your program runs out of memory and allocation fails (or the constructor fails for some other internal reason), you will have problems later on. Basically, you must signal a ...


2

You might be thinking of an exception guarantee, in particular the "strong guarantee".


1

Having read your edit, I suspect your title is slightly incorrect. Do you really mean it has no side effects whether or not an exception is thrown (as per the current wording) or that it has no side effects when an exception is thrown, but if the method completes without throwing an exception then it will/can have side effects? There's a pretty big ...


1

If you are only concerned about errors that occur during the GenerateHtml() call, and don't like the second approach (which seems fine to me), why not move the closing span tag into a finally block, and pull out the open call: htw.RenderBeginTag( HtmlTextWriterTag.Span ); try { htw.Write(myObject.GenerateHtml()); } catch (Exception e) { ...


1

I think enough discussion has been generated to warrant yet another answer. Firstly, to answer the actual question, yes, it is absolutely appropriate (and even necessary!) to pass an argument by smart pointer when ownership transfer occurs. Passing by a smart pointer is a common idiom to accomplish that. void manage(std::auto_ptr<T> t) { ... } ...


1

Yes, that's fine. (See edit below.) (jkp might be seeing something I've missed, but I don't think you "still have to clean up in the event of an exception being thrown" because, as you say, in that case the auto_ptr will delete the object for you.) But I think it would be better still to hide the auto_ptr shenanigans from the caller: void manage(T *t) { ...


1

For your first set of questions: Yes, you should throw, for all the reasons in @Mark's answer. (+1 to him) It's not really necessary, but it can make life on your callers a lot easier. One of the benefits of exception handling is that it localizes code to deal with a specific class of error together at one places. By throwing a specific exception type, you ...



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