Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

All of your questions can be answered with deploytool. Here, you'll find an overview of the tool. I've done what you're trying to do, included the inclusion of packages, with this tool, and found it fairly simple. It does, however, require the MATLAB Compiler, which I understand is quite expensive. I found that my development machine at work already had the ...


0

If you want to load an executable .NET assembly into your own process use AppDomain.ExecuteAssembly: int exitCode = AppDomain.Current.ExecuteAssembly("path"); There is also ExecuteAssemblyByName if you have the assembly name instead of the path.


2

If it is native exe - use Process.Start, if it is managed (i.e. create with C#) you need to load assembly and than call Main via reflection. Native exe: Process.Start("IExplore.exe"); It looks like you have managed assembly and you've already know Main entrypoint (via Assembly.EntryPoint property). You need to makes sure it is not null (unlikely) and ...


1

Use the html video tag Like this: <video src="link to mp4"></video>


0

It is fixed. Error was occurring due to installation of twisted dependencies in wrong order. Using following post I reinstall everything then it is fixed. http://www.metamul.com/blog/installing-python-twisted-on-windows/ Thank you


0

I have to learn VFP because I want to move to my company's development sector and they have some products written in VFP, eventually I got stuck into this problem too. But I found the way to do it properly. You need to initialize the event processing loop like this. DO FORM ppp READ EVENTS Source: ...


0

You need to add the JAR file containing that class to the launch4j options.


0

Adding on to jltrem, an example of Process.Start is: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.processstartinfo(v=vs.110).aspx using System; using System.Diagnostics; using System.ComponentModel; namespace MyProcessSample { class MyProcess { // Opens the Internet Explorer application. void OpenApplication(string myFavoritesPath) ...


1

The C++ code isn't using a command 'prompt', per se, but launching a process by providing a path the the executable to CreateProcess. You can accomplish the same thing in C# with the Process class. Configure Process.StartInfo and call the Start method.


1

Try this: string path = System.IO.Path.Combine(typeof(Program).Assembly.Location, "MyExe.exe"); using (Process.Start(path)) { }


3

Not exactly. There are tools that can create .exe files out of Java executable jars, but that's in no way a normal feature of the JDK. There are very few cases where an .exe file would be an actual necessity, since to run a regular jar you just need to have Java installed and properly configured. A simple test to decide whether to go for a jar or an exe is ...


5

The only reason to create a .exe file is to make it easier to run an application or installer in Windows. Java compiles to byte code which is then run in the JVM. Normally the .exe is just a wrapper that makes sure that the java VM is started and that the class bytes stored within the .exe (or any other location) are run.


0

use cx_freeze, as you can see from its site, cx_freeze is compatible with Python 3. And I really like its documentation.


0

Well the answer is the /stub option in the Linker you are using for your Windows code. Some additional information for anyone who finds the question later.... I had to do several days of web searches to find that there doesn't appear to be another answer to my particular problem. Stub requires that the DOS mode executable have a header of at least 40 ...


-1

u just use Turbo C++ it will automatically make a .exe file. You can find it under "TurboC++\Disk\TurboC3\BIN" hope this hepled


0

Add a readkey at the end of a console application to have the window stay open untill you press any key Console.ReadKey();


1

Put a ReadLine at the end of the program public class Program { public void Main(string[] args) { /*Program logic*/ Console.WriteLine("Press enter to continue..."); Console.ReadLine(); } }


4

You can write this after your code: Console.ReadKey(); or Console.ReadLine(); or even Console.Read(); It will close when you press any key.


0

The documentation for Visual Studio 6 describes the /STUB option here, simply point this at the DOS version of your program. I don't have VS6 handy, so I can't be too specific, but in the project settings GUI, there should be an "additional options" setting in the linker section.


2

I don't know if it has been continued in Windows 7 executables, but back in Win95 the executable (EXE) actually had two entry points -- one "normal" one that DOS would find, and a second one that Windows would use. The DOS entry point was usually a very simple default that would just print "This is a Windows program" and exit. You can actually override this ...


0

Use WinRar. The parameters can be passed using the -sp option. http://www.winrar-tr.com/winrar/Help/ENG/html/HELPGUISFXCmd.htm myexe.exe -spoptions "options" will be passed to the program in the setup field of the executable.


0

I do not fathom how I could miss it, but its simply my Avast antivirus program interfering. One of the shields was causing all my python exe's to "stall" its calling parent window upon completion.


1

sudo sh ./mergevec samples.txt samples.vec sh above is a shell. It expects its first argument to be a shell script, a text file. You have a compiled executable, so the correct thing to do is to run it directly: sudo ./mergevec samples.txt samples.vec


3

If you're using PyInstaller try to use -w option when building your app.


2

If you are using py2exe, setup(windows=['your_code.py'], ...) instead of console See Make a py2exe exe run without a console? UPDATE pyinstaller manual says -w, --windowed, --noconsole use a windowed subsystem executable, which on Windows does not open the console when the program is launched. This option is mandatory when creating .app bundle on ...


0

If you're having problems then try to re-install the program. Or try to download a more recent version of Python. https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pywin32-ctypes/0.0.1 https://pypi.python.org/pypi?%3Aaction=index


0

You can do by using a variable as below: Local $exeLocation = "C:\LCR 12\stu.exe" Run($exeLocation)


1

No its not possible At least it is not specific for GWT in comparison with other Javascript ways to do this. i.e : If there is a way to do this then it is a huge bug and security flaw in the browser. You can offer the file for download and let the user execute it. But I guess that is not what you want.


1

You cannot access any files on a user's computer from a web browser. Otherwise, every computer in the world could be be easily hacked. You can offer a user to install a program, and then ask this user to start this program, but you cannot install and run this program yourself.


1

Well actually you need to create a separate process to handle the update steps. I have once developed a desktop application with the ability to receive updates form a web server and i did that by creating a different process that roles as the main entry point to the main application. it starts the main application process while it keeps running to check for ...


0

You'll need to create a separate bootstrap application to do the work for you, as otherwise the app with be running so the OS will prevent you from overwriting it.


2

If on Python 2, use py2exe. This supports versions 2.3 through to 2.7. If on Python 3, use cx_Freeze. This supports versions 2.7 through to 3.4.


1

Usually a command-line utility can receive its parameters as command-line arguments, but sir_util2 instead reads user input from stdin via the C runtime function fscanf1. The subprocess convenience functions call, check_call, and check_outputdon't make it easy to send input to stdin. Use the Popen class directly and then communicate. I manually traced the ...


0

You could simply use os.system. Here's an example from os import system system("Path\to\Application.exe input file arguments outputfile") This is from Python 2.7, but should work in 3.x.


0

This sounds like something you should never do. If you want to do UI automation Windows already has support for that, using SendInput or keybd_event is not a good idea. Some apps steal foreground focus, this is just a fact and if that happens at the wrong time you end up sending input to the wrong window.


-1

If you own the code for the EXE then it would be a lot better for you to turn your EXE code into a library. Then you'll be able to refer to that library from anywhere and call any public functionnality it has. It's a far, far, FAR better approach. Should you still need to run that code as a standalone process, nothing prevents you from making a new EXE ...


2

Well, technically you can embed a binary file as a resource within a DLL (by adding the file as a binary resource through the project properties), but you'll still need to save the file to disk in order to execute it (which is assume what you're trying to do) and will possibly have security issues unless your application is fully trusted. If the binary file ...


7

Devenv.com isn't actually an executable that uses the COM file format. It is simply an plain EXE that was just renamed. Windows isn't otherwise fooled by it, it always looks a the header of the file. The "MZ" prefix that's present in the header is enough to convince it that it is really an EXE file and is relocatable, it doesn't just go by the filename ...


0

I think its need numpy. If yes then import numpy within setup.py resolved the issue


0

It depends on your toolchain. With VC++, the entry point is typically either mainCRTStartup() or WinMainCRTStartup. I assume it might be different if you use another compiler and library. You can also override this in the linker by specifying your own entry point.


0

Yes it is possible but it is definitely not recommended, as this can cause major secure risks and to have open access to .exe files can mean serious implications for your server. First off, your server needs to be running on a windows ISS server. I guess you already are as you understand that the file will only run on a windows machine. Next you need to ...


1

You can embed it as a resource in your exefile. But you have to extract it and run it. You can run it hidden as prev poster noted. How to do that? Download ResHacker to embed the resource. Here's a sample that includes vb6 source code for a self extracting installer. Don't install it as what it installs doesn't work on post win 2000 versions. The ...


0

I think I found the answer myself just now by poking around. first of all you can to go the directory using help [whatever_command] it will give you all the options or sometime you have to use in my case (an exe file) XsltTransform /?


1

Your example code has an EXE file. I am assuming you have access to the source-code from which the EXE was generated. The -i -x -o are all input parameters. Somewhere within that EXE, there's some code that handles these parameters and stores them into variables. -i dir_1\dir_2\blah.xml -x dir_x\dir_y\something.xslt -o path1\path2\result.html Thus, ...


0

Excuse my english. You have to follow the next steps: Add your dll file as reference to your console project. Project>>Add Reference>>Browse and select your dll file. add usign myNamespaceOfMyDll; Then in your code you can use the methods from your dll file. Sample (Using the GMmap's dll) : using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using ...


0

If you don't want to show the command prompt you can have a look at the following post here on stackoverflow


1

try mvn assembly:single. It is specifically used for creation of executable jar file. Also you need to configure this plugin in your pom.xml


0

use an installer, these allow you to select all needed dependencies and package them into a single archive and extract it into a designated folder. To find these dependencies there is the dependency walker I personally use nsis for this.


0

What Firefox does is to add the path to its executable to the "App Paths" subkey, which is the preferred solution against modifying the 'path' environment variable. To make the same for lazarus, you can add a HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths\lazarus.exe key having the (Default) value of the path to the executable, ...


0

Could it be that your firefox has been added to the environment variable which is why you can start it anywhere without specifying the full path check under Control Panel » System » Advanced » Environment Variables



Top 50 recent answers are included