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1

Try the java readLine() command in a while loop. Give it a terminating condition like Yes or No.


1

Your command is writing to the standard in of your process. You could just write to that process from your Java code instead. Something like, String cmd = "myprog -t"; String arg = "show version"; try { Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd); PrintStream ps = new PrintStream(p.getOutputStream()); ps.println(arg); ps.flush(); final ...


1

Firstly, you can't sudo it directly like that. So you have to change some configurations in sudoers file. Run sudo visudo in console, add the following line at the end of file nobody ALL = NOPASSWD: /var/www/script P.S.: It's a security risk to use your script like that which would sometime perform breach in data security in a great extent so my ...


0

use try-catch surround write-flush try{ dataOutputStream.writeBytes("am force-stop com.XXX.XXX.XXX"); dataOutputStream.flush(); }catch(IOException e){ } Unaffected the exec result !


0

I haven't found a perfect solution to this yet. All my execs seem to be different from each other. On windows there are various issues. Preserving double quotes around filename (or other) arguments. e.g. in tasklist /fi "pid eq 2060" /nh the quotes are required. Preserving spaces in filename arguments. Preserving backslash characters in filename ...


0

After a bit of digging i found ssh has has an stdio redirector when used with -n option. http://www.pixelbeat.org/programming/stdio_buffering/ To tell ssh that the remote command doesn't require any input use the -n option


0

You can simply surround the entire exec statement in curly braces. Like this: catch {exec start notepad++.exe f:\Path\test.txt -n10}


0

turns out it's easier than it looks. changing from var c=a=[]; to var c=a={}; solves the problem. wonderful how you can look at it a 100 times and never see it, then the next day it's so obvious ...


2

Similar to this question: exec {*}[auto_execok start] notepad++ F:/Path/test.txt -n10 First, you need to supply each argument of the command as separate values, instead of a single string/list. Next, to mimic the start command, you would need to use {*}[auto_execok start]. I also used forward slashes instead of backslashes, since you would get a first ...


0

The way I would approach this problem is by writing a binary file with the following structure: begin file header: 0x00 :: 0x03 [ 4 bytes] number of entries for each entry n at offset 0x04 + n * 4: 0x00 :: 0x03 [ 4 bytes] string length of entry (including terminating \0) end file header after the header, write all entries as strings to the file, ...


1

My suggestion for the file format the first line is a decimal number N which is equal to argc the next N lines are the argv strings, one string per line then there's another decimal number M which is equal to the number of environment strings the next M lines are the environment strings, one string per line To read the file back into memory read the ...


5

>> is a shell operator. You have not invoked a shell. You must do so if you want to use shell operators. Give /bin/sh -c a try.


0

Your question is basically this: You want to execute a system command via node, and capture the standard output. The best way to do that is using the child_process module: var sys = require('sys') var exec = require('child_process').exec; exec('node sample.js -mobile production', function(err, stdout, stderr) { console.log('Process finished ...


0

That -exec command isn't safe for strings with spaces. You want something like this instead (assuming finding any of the strings is reason not to add any of the strings). find /directory/ -name "file.php" -type f -exec sh -c "grep -q 'string1|string2|string3' \"\$1\" || echo -e 'string1\nstring2\nstring3\n' >> \"\$1\"" - {} \; To explain the safety ...


0

A couple of points: You are suffering from the need to perform non-blocking I/O. You are reading a line from a file, then writing it to a pipe. But there is no guarantee tr will conveniently write that line back translated. It might wait for the next line to come in. There is no line discipline in place. What you need to do is read from your file, write to ...


1

You can use the exec functions. int execl(const char *path, const char *arg, ...); For example, execl("/bin/ls","ls","-l",NULL); In the path you can give your executable code to run. If you want to give the argument to your functions you can give that in the double quotes.


2

I see that setText() and append() are no longer thread-safe since Java 7.


3

You can use the exec function for compiling that. execl("/usr/bin/gcc or cc","cc","path name or filename",NULL); Using this one you can compile that program easily. If the file name is given it will taken from the current directory. Or else it will taken from the given path.


0

Since the exec call is a blocking call you have no way of using buffers to get status. Instead you could redirect the output in the system call to a log file. Let the client query the server for progress update in which case the server could parse the last lines of the log file to get information about current progress and send it back to the client.


0

There are some significant differences between exec(2) and system(3) that should be kept in mind. system() returns to the caller, whereas exec() replaces the existing code with the new image. This has been explained above. However, the not so subtle difference comes when you want to run a procedure and then return to your existing code, receiving the ...


0

I have found what was causing my problem. From man iwlist: Triggering scanning is a privileged operation (root only) and normal users can only read left-over scan results. I was running node.js as limited user and scanning from shell with root.


2

First problem: There is no way to prevent inheritance of file descriptors except you close them yourself or set FD_CLOEXEC, check this Second problem: You got The return value of waitpid is often 0, because you sepecfied WNOHANG in waitpid. waitpid(): on success, returns the process ID of the child whose state has changed; if WNOHANG was specified and ...


1

First, in 2014, never use vfork but simply fork(2). (Since vfork(2) is obsolete since POSIX 2001 and removed in POSIX 2008). Then, the simplest way to close most of file descriptors is just for (int fd=3; fd<256; fd++) (void) close(fd); (hint: if a fd is invalid, close(fd) would fail and we ignore the failure; and you start from 3 to keep open ...


1

The interpreter file is the program that runs the rest of the script. The main use of specifying an interpreter file is to make it easier to run the program and to make sure the correct interpreter is used. If you want to run the perl scipt myPerlProgram you type: $ perl myPerlProgram If you have a perl program with an interpreter file you only need to ...


0

One primary problem is that you can't make up your mind whether to use f_des or fd for the pipe file descriptors. You have: int f_des[2]; int fd[2]; int pipe(int filedes[2]); … if (pipe(f_des) == -1) { perror("Pipe"); exit(2); } The declaration of pipe() is not a good idea; that's what the system headers do. But the serious problem is that you ...


1

The family of functions of the form exec* are unique in that as soon as the program reaches them, the entire process memory is erased and rewritten with the process memory of the new program. Your code isn't jumping out of the loop, the loop doesn't exist any more. If you want to mimic the way the shell works, you'll have to use another system call to ...


1

execvp replaces the current process with the process you are asking it to run. You need to use fork to create a child process and run execvp from the child process. That way, the parent will be still alive and be able to process more user input.


3

You can get around this by changing your print statement in the function func() from print(x) to print(locals()['x']). Your code would now look like the following. (Tested on Python 3.3.4) Between python 2 and 3 the "exec" command changed from a statement to function which changes the scope. def func(): varnames = ['x','y','z'] vals = [5,5, 'abc'] ...


1

This is simple solution and works on every platform, but it has some minor drawback. You are introducing latency to asio-part of your application, which may be acceptable or not - depends on your case. You may be interested in my solution, that makes real integration of asio and QT mainloops. Look also at the following question for more on this topic: How ...


2

What you experience is the normal unix behaviour: An executed command always has two output pipes: standard out and error out. The documentation states that all output is given back. That does not include stuff written to the error output. That is using a separate pipe py purpose to separate error and normal output. If you want to capture that too you have ...


0

I am not sure that exec is the right keyword to use. Here is a personal example on how to start a process and monitor it: check process mako matching "mako.conf" start program = "/usr/bin/mako -d -c /home/pi/mako/mako.conf" stop program = "/usr/bin/killall mako" if 5 restarts within 5 cycles then timeout Regards


1

I think you want this. move the close up so the read can know that it won't get any more. write(par_pipe[1], "haha\n", 5); close(par_pipe[1]); you seem to missing a dup for stdout in the child segment too,


0

I've solved the problem by installing a report generator task from codeplex website. it's an SSIS component which renders remote reports from sssrs and show them during execution.


0

Apart from the metioned security issues with system(), the spawned process inherits the main program's environment. This can be very problematic when using suid, for example when the calling process sets LD_LIBRARY_PATH-environment variable. With the exec()-family the calling program can set the environment to exactly what's needed (and safe) for the called ...


4

system will call the shell (sh) to execute the command sent as an argument. The problem with system because the shell behavior depends on the user who run the command. A small example: Creating a file test.c: #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { if (system ("ls") != 0) printf("Error!"); return 0; } Then: $ gcc test.c -o test $ ...


6

system() and execve() work in different ways. system() will always invoke the shell and this shell will execute the command as a separate process (this is why you can use wildcards and other shell facilities in the command line when using system()). execve() (and the other functions in the exec() family) replaces the current process with the one being ...


2

You need to change permission of xyz.exe chmod u+x /Users/abc/xyz.exe


0

You didnt have execute permission in that file. You need to change the execute permission for that file.it only contains read and write. Please refer here to change permission


2

It's true that you need to avoid forking, but you also need to avoid executing. There is no /bin/cd that programs call to change directories. Instead of executing something, call the chdir system call with your path. If the user types cd /tmp, call chdir("/tmp") The current directory is a property of each process (as the open files or the umask value) You ...


1

The memory mappings are replaced when you call any of the exec*() functions. It doesn't matter how much memory the child process uses after fork() as exec*() will cause the existing memory mappings of the process to be destroyed and new memory to be allocated/mapped for the new executable. See also the official documentation on what exec() does


0

You are using smart-quotes in your code. Correct that, and find out why you got them. They are simply wrong and your program won't compile with them. An array of char* of length deduced from the initializer: char* arg_list[] = { The elements are initialized from a string-literal, which is a 0-terminated array of non-modifiable char-elements. Those arrays ...


0

Since version 1.7 the class ProcessBuilder knows a method inheritIO() which can be called prior to creating a process to achieve this: ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder(new String[] { "ls", "-la" }); pb.inheritIO(); Process p = pb.start(); exitValue = p.waitFor(); A version like this for 1.6 does not seem to be available, though. (Remarks are always ...


1

you could try this: http://ant.apache.org/manual/Tasks/exec.html <exec executable="/bin/sh" spawn="true"> <arg value="-c"/> <arg value="nohup evince /home/my.pdf &gt;&gt; /dev/null &amp; exit"/> </exec>


0

Why not put your .toString() in quotes and then read it as an art in the main class in programming.jar


0

You missed then after if failed: if failed then


0

To prevent of zombie processes you need to tell the parent to wait for the child, until the child's terminates the process. You need to use the waitpid() function that is included in the library 'sys/wait.h' Down here you have an example code that you can use the waitpid() function. #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include ...


3

If you want to create a "detached" process that you don't have to wait for, the best way is to fork twice so that it's a "grandchild" process. Immediately waitpid on the direct child process, which should call _exit immediately after forking again (so this waitpid does not block forward progress in the parent). The grandchild process will be orphaned so it ...


0

have a look at https://busyreports.codeplex.com, it's not in ssis but you can find a full example of setting parameters, etc.. in the code


0

Now answered - the problem was as Mats Petersson pointed out in the comments, I was simply missing a cin.clear() in the parent thread. Once the first one failed, the EOF flag was raised which I guess I'd assumed would have been reset automatically when the thread was created the next time around.


6

Update docker on host. docker exec was introduced on docker 1.3.0



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