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0

Submit all the tasks first, then get the results from them one at a time. This means that while you are waiting for the first result, the others may also be running at the same time. List<Future<ServiceResponse>> futures = new ArrayList<>(); for(Long i= start; i <= end; i++ ) futures.add(executor.submit(getTask(i))); for ...


0

The best way is what we actually have in the javadoc which is: The following method shuts down an ExecutorService in two phases, first by calling shutdown to reject incoming tasks, and then calling shutdownNow, if necessary, to cancel any lingering tasks: void shutdownAndAwaitTermination(ExecutorService pool) { pool.shutdown(); // Disable new ...


-1

This is a tricky one. Here’s what I came up with: public class TaskQueue<T> { private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(TaskQueue.class.getName()); private final Collection<Callable<T>> tasks; private final int maxTasks; private int addsPending; private final Collection<T> results = new ...


0

If you have to monitor each task to kill it when it exceeds the timeout period, either the task itself has to keep track of time and quit appropriately, OR you have to create a second watchdog thread for every task. The watchdog thread sets a timer and sleeps, waking up after the timeout interval expires and then terminating the task if it's still ...


3

Either use some kind of coordination mechanism (phaser, which was introduced in Java 7 is useful when you need to add more jobs on the fly) or just keep an external flag you set when done: ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(N); volatile boolean done = false; // add your jobs: service.submit(() -> { while (!done) { // do ...


2

Let's be clear about one thing: HTTP is a blocking, synchronous protocol. Request/response pairs aren't asynch. What you're doing is spawning asynch requests and returning to the caller to let them know the request is being processed (HTTP 200) or not (HTTP 500). I'm not sure that I know optimal for this situation, but there are other considerations: ...


1

Catch the exception call shutdown/shutdownNow API in ExecutorService shutdown() Initiates an orderly shutdown in which previously submitted tasks are executed, but no new tasks will be accepted. Invocation has no additional effect if already shut down. This method does not wait for previously submitted tasks to complete execution. Use awaitTermination to ...


1

As a clean way, you can simply use a static accessed class to set/check the execution availability. import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicBoolean; class ThreadManager { private static AtomicBoolean shouldStop = new AtomicBoolean(false); public static void setExceptionThrown(boolean val) { shouldStop.set(val); } public ...


3

ExecutorService.shutdown javadoc says: Initiates an orderly shutdown in which previously submitted tasks are executed, but no new tasks will be accepted. So tasks that already submitted, but not yet started, will be executed. Exactly as you need.


0

package test; import static java.nio.file.StandardWatchEventKinds.ENTRY_CREATE; import static java.nio.file.StandardWatchEventKinds.ENTRY_DELETE; import static java.nio.file.StandardWatchEventKinds.ENTRY_MODIFY; import java.io.IOException; import java.nio.file.FileSystems; import java.nio.file.Files; import java.nio.file.Path; import java.nio.file.Paths; ...


0

There is a very elegant way to create a Call Back system and implementing it via implementing ReadableByteChannel in order to monitor the progerss of copying files. Also the benefit is there is no need to monitor a directory. You can explicitly monitor the progress of the file which is being copied. The main idea is proposed by this site, but changed it a ...


2

Inside the run method you check for termination status of the threadpool: while(!scheduler.isTerminated()) {} This will do the following: The thread executing that runnable will enter the loop. Since the thread is still "active" i.e. has not finished run the condition will be true ( "not terminated = true" ). That will keep the thread in the loop ...


0

Except different timeout for differant Tasks, other things can be achieved easily. You have to use ThreadPoolExecutor with below parameters public ThreadPoolExecutor(int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, ...


0

As others have stated, if you are sharing your Vector across Runnables, then it is not threadsafe. To be threadsafe, you should use either bound queue (like BlockingQueue) or unbound queue (like ConcurrentLinkedQueue) instead of Vector.


0

You are using newFixedThreadPool so it means, at any point max n threads are active. If you start n Runnables and all threads are busy, every additional Runnable will wait until a thread is available. Your implementation has no shared resources (at least it looks like so) between runnables. In this case you don't need synchronization. But if, for example, ...


0

FutureTask :: boolean cancel(boolean mayInterruptIfRunning) will perform interrupt on current running thread. FutureTask.java public boolean cancel(boolean mayInterruptIfRunning) { if (!(state == NEW && UNSAFE.compareAndSwapInt(this, stateOffset, NEW, mayInterruptIfRunning ? INTERRUPTING : CANCELLED))) return ...


0

You are not catching timeout exception in current code before printing Start 4 but you are catching Exception after `Start 4' line. So you are not getting desired output in case of timeout. Change your code from Object result = future.get(9, TimeUnit.SECONDS); to try { Object result = future.get(9, TimeUnit.SECONDS); } catch ...


0

This is because of AbstractExecutorService :: submit is wrapping your runnable into RunnableFuture (nothing but FutureTask) like below AbstractExecutorService.java public Future<?> submit(Runnable task) { if (task == null) throw new NullPointerException(); RunnableFuture<Void> ftask = newTaskFor(task, null); /////////HERE//////// ...


1

For linear dependencies, you can just return a new Runnable that execute the tasks one by one. This way you have full control over the order of execution. A list of Runnable will not guarantee the order - you need the other class to respect the contract as well. public Runnable getRunnable() { Runnable r1 = ... Runnable r2 = ... return ()->{ ...


1

One could argue a Batch class is supposed to supply a number of Runnable which have to be processed in order. So encapsulating a number of Runnable inside another Runnable might hide to much. But I do understand your requirement to simplify the code down to Runnable A simple solution could be: public class Batch implements Runnable{ public ...


0

You are using future.get(9, TimeUnit.SECONDS); This will wait for 9 seconds, for the submitted thread to finish. If you don't need the main program to wait and also don't require anything to be returned by the thread, then use the executor.execute call. Here is the updated code... ExecutorService executor = null; try { executor = ...


2

Have you considered using an asynchronous method on a Stateless Session Bean (with the @Asynchronous annotation)? This method would make the call to the web service and the app server (via the EJB pool) would be responsible for managing concurrency. See: https://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/tutorial/doc/gkkqg.html


1

Sorry, I not good with computer. The problem was that I was echoing many messages in a loop to the socket, but the echo command sends messages sequentially and waits for every message to finish before it sends the next one.


0

The problem is this call: executorService.execute(new ConnectionHandler(socket)); The execute method is allowed to force the calling thread to block until the task is complete, or even have the calling thread perform the actual work. Instead, do this: executorService.submit(new ConnectionHandler(socket)); This will asynchronously run your task using ...


0

This is supported with CompletableFutures. CompletableFuture.runAsync(() -> { String threadName = Thread.currentThread().getName(); System.out.println(threadName); //print -> pool-1-thread-1 }).whenComplete((task, throwable) -> { if(throwable != null) { System.out.println(e.getMessage()); ...


0

I want to perform onSuccess() method on the main thread. How can i fix this. You can't. Nothing in Java can make a thread stop what it was doing, do something else for a moment, and then go back to whatever it was doing. Some programming environments have a feature like that---Unix signals, hardware interrupts---But it's just not part of the Java ...


0

The point of a Future is that the associated computation is performed in a separate thread. The onSuccess method is a way for that separate thread to say that it has finished performing the computation. It would make no sense for the main thread to call onSuccess, since the main thread doesn't perform the computation and doesn't know when the computation ...


0

The full answer is a composition of two answers that were published here (plus a bit "extra"): By submitting a task (vs. executing it) you get back a future which can be used to get the result or cancel the action. You don't have this kind of control when you execute (because its return type id void) execute expects a Runnable while submit can take either ...


1

In Java8 you can do it with CompletableFuture: ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4); List<Runnable> tasks = getTasks(); CompletableFuture[] all = tasks.stream() .map(r -> runAsync(r, es)) .toArray(CompletableFuture[]::new); CompletableFuture.allOf(all).join(); ...


1

Submit your tasks into the Runner and then wait calling the method waitTillDone() like this: Runner runner = Runner.runner(2); for (DataTable singleTable : uniquePhrases) { runner.run(new ComputeDTask(singleTable)); } // blocks until all tasks are finished (or failed) runner.waitTillDone(); runner.shutdown(); the source code for this class can be ...


1

You could call waitTillDone() on this Runner class: Runner runner = Runner.runner(4); // create pool with 4 threads in thread pool while(...) { runner.run(new MyTask()); // here you submit your task } runner.waitTillDone(); // and this blocks until all tasks are finished (or failed) runner.shutdown(); // once you done you can shutdown the runner ...



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