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3

You can view the source of a function even if its not loaded. > exists("zoo::is.zoo") [1] FALSE > zoo::is.zoo function (object) inherits(object, "zoo") <environment: namespace:zoo> So you could exploit that with a function like this exists_unloaded <- function(fn) { tryCatch( { fn TRUE }, error=function(e) FALSE ) } If the ...


3

I believe this can be done by GROUPING and then ensuring the DISTINCT count is equal to the number of search items: SELECT [DRSY], [DRRT] FROM dbo.f0005 WHERE DRKY IN ('FC', 'OO', 'SH') GROUP BY [DRSY], [DRRT] HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT DRKY) = 3; Edit, Re Ensuring Count of Items remains in Sync What you could do is build up a derived ...


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What you're trying to do would actually qualify as macro programming in SAS, which is sometimes considered an "advanced" topic. The normal if-then control logic you're using is what SAS considers data-step code, i.e. it's only valid in the data step. But there is a "macro" language that looks similar, but is distinguished by % prefixes. Here's how your ...


2

The way you wrote that constraint is just fine. And it is not surprising that Z3 (or any other solver) would have a hard time solving such problems as you have both quantifiers and non-linear arithmetic. Such problems are intrinsically hard to solve. You might look into Z3's nlsat tactic, which might provide some relief here: How does Z3 handle non-linear ...


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Just remove/comment the code below: <?php if ($layout['layout_id'] == $my['layout_id']) { ?> <!-- <option value="<?php echo $layout['layout_id']; ?>" selected="selected"> <?php echo $layout['name']; ?> </option> --> <?php } else { ?> You are already checking the ...


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If you didn't want to clutter the search path using loadNamespace would work in conjunction with getAnywhere Note that this will find functions unexported or exported... loadNamespace('zoo') x <- getAnywhere('is.zoo') x[['where']]=='namespace:zoo' # TRUE Wrap it in a function exist_pkg <- function(f, pkg){ loadNamespace(pkg) x <- ...


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There is no way to check the existence of a sequence through existing mediators. If you really need to do that, you can write a class mediator and check the synapseConfiguration object. But for your case, you can use a switch mediator and add a default case with a default sequence to notify that the request has a not supported version. <Switch> ...


1

Change join (which is short for inner join) to left join (= left outer join). This will return all parkings and will just return null for the address fields if there is no matching address: SELECT * FROM `parking_parking` LEFT JOIN `parking_address` ON `parking_parking`.`parking_address` = `parking_address`.`address_id` WHERE `parking_id` = 3


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Well I would suggest you to reform it to a LEFT JOIN and an ISNULL function: SELECT ARTICLES.sku, ARTICLES.family_set, ARTICLES.classe_article, COALESCE(ACompany.CATALOG_PAGE2,0) AS pag_cat_mega FROM WORK.ARTICLES AS ARTICLES LEFT JOIN ODS.ARTICLECOMPANY14 AS ACompany ON ACompany.ITEMNUM = ARTICLES.sku;


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proc sql supports exists. I suspect the problem might be the double quotes: PROC SQL; CREATE TABLE WORK.test AS SELECT a.sku, a.family_set, a.classe_article, (CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM ODS.ARTICLECOMPANY14 oc WHERE oc.ITEMNUM = a.sku) ...


1

I'll start by saying that your rhetoric is terrible. The first thing you say in your post is a fallacy -- appeal to popularity. Is this really the way a professional handles himself? As to your actual question, both exists and in are the same. Any sane query plan optimizer will produce the same plan for them both. -- http://sqlfiddle.com/#!6/97c87/1 ...


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What about SELECT DRSY, DRRT, DRKY, DRDL01 FROM dbo.f0005 a WHERE exists ( SELECT * FROM dbo.f005 b WHERE DRKY = "FC" and a.DRSY = b.DRSY and a.DRRT = b.DRRT ) AND exists ( SELECT * FROM dbo.f005 c WHERE DRKY = "00" and a.DRSY = c.DRSY and a.DRRT = c.DRRT ) AND exists ( SELECT * FROM dbo.f005 d WHERE DRKY = "SH" and a.DRSY = d.DRSY and a.DRRT = ...


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I found this question because I wanted to check if a list contains a specific item, rather than just checking the list's length. To see if an element exists within a list, use the lsearch function: if {[lsearch -exact $myList 4] >= 0} { puts "Found 4 in myList!" } The lsearch function returns the index of the first found element or -1 if the given ...


1

The question was: "why NOT IN appears to be faster than NOT EXISTS". My answer is: it only appears to be faster, but it is the same. (in this case) Did you actually measure the time for both queries and confirm that there is a difference? OR you just looked at the execution plans? As far as I understand, the query cost that you see on the screenshots ...


1

I think the missing index cause the difference for EXISTS() and IN operations. Although the question do not ask for a better query, but for me I'll try to avoid the Distinct like this SELECT a.SFAccountID, a.SLXID, a.Name FROM [dbo].[Salesforce_Accounts] a WITH(NOLOCK) CROSS APPLY ( SELECT SFAccountID FROM ...


1

as far as i understand it, a not in works in the same fashion as two nested for instructions would. so, asuming you have two tables: table(1000 records) and tabla (2000 records), select * from table where table.field not in (select field from tabla) is like doing for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < 2000; j++) { } } ...


1

try SELECT DISTINCT a.SFAccountID, a.SLXID, a.Name FROM [dbo].[Salesforce_Accounts] a WITH(NOLOCK) JOIN _SLX_AccountChannel b WITH(NOLOCK) ON a.SLXID = b.ACCOUNTID AND b.STATUS IN ('Active','Customer', 'Current') JOIN [dbo].[Salesforce_Contacts] c WITH(NOLOCK) ON a.SFAccountID = c.SFAccountID AND c.Primary__C = 0 LEFT JOIN ...



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