Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

You can use function_exists() to check if one of the mcrypt functions exists. if(function_exists("mcrypt_encrypt")) { echo "mcrypt is loaded!"; } else { echo "mcrypt isn't loaded!"; }


5

The code you provide contains a race condition: Between you checking for dst to not exist and copying something into dst, a third party could have created the file dst, causing you to overwrite a file. Either remove the os.path.exists(dst) check because it cannot reliably detect if the target exists at the time you try to remove it, or employ the following ...


2

FOR /F "tokens=*" %%v IN (%LIST2%) DO ( ... SET "SYMPATH=" if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if not defined ...


2

The translation if your Python code to Go is: if _, err := os.Stat(src); err != nil { // The source does not exist or some other error accessing the source log.Fatal("source:", err) } if _, err := os.Stat(dst); !os.IsNotExists(dst) { // The destination exists or some other error accessing the destination log.Fatal("dest:", err) } if err := ...


1

The correct way of doing this is the following: PROCEDURE stored_proc_b IS num_rows number; BEGIN select COUNT(*) into num_rows FROM my_table WHERE my_table.xyz = 123; -- (whatever is appropriate) if num_rows < 1 then stored_proc_a; end if; END; Figured this out ...


1

In order to add a key-value pair to an existing array just do it like the key exists there. $array["list"]["serwer-2"] = 7; Then you will get desired result.


1

If I understand your task you can left join your tableA to check for existence of particular record - if record doesn't exist you will have NULL for joined values, otherwise you'll have some value. Then in case NULL value you can replace it with a value from tableB. Something like this: SELECT COALESCE(tA.address1, tB.address1, N'N/A') AS address1 FROM ...


1

The example is a double-nested NOT EXISTS query. If a subquery returns any rows at all, EXISTS subquery is TRUE, and NOT EXISTS subquery is FALSE. That is, it has a NOT EXISTS clause within a NOT EXISTS clause. It is easier to say that a nested NOT EXISTS answers the question “is x TRUE for all y?” --Part 3 SELECT r.index, SUM(c.points) FROM ...


1

Always analyze the query from the inside out. Innermost query: Select the exams with score higher than 5 Middle one: Select the required courses that don't have an exam with score higher than 5 Outer one: Select students that don't have a required course that doesn't have the exam with score higher than 5


1

Your test on OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#attributeType') works fine. You can test it by running it separately, without a drop and create in the same batch. The problem is that SQL Server parses the entire batch before it runs it. If it knows that #attributeType exists it will give an error for: SELECT * INTO #attributeType Even if you drop the table in the ...


1

All PORT_ID values from PORTS whose values exist in the HOME_PORT_ID column of the SHIPS table are returned. Your query, which queries SHIPS once for every row in PORTS, can be rewritten more efficiently as: SELECT PORT_ID FROM PORTS WHERE PORT_ID IN (SELECT HOME_PORT_ID FROM SHIPS) which only queries SHIPS once. But it can be rewritten even more ...


1

Only the rows in ports that have a matching line in ships (using predicate P1.PORT_ID = S1.HOME_PORT_ID) will show up. That means that if there is no row in ships with the same port_id, the rows of ports will not be shown.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible