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0

You got an array( too much in there. Try this: $collection->findOne(array("_id"=> new MongoId($uid), "mydetails"=> array('$exists' => true)));


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Autovivification doesn't happen for single-level access so you can safely write my $value = $hash{$key}; For multi-level access intermediate entries will be autovivified. e.g. my $value = $hash{a}{b}; will create a reference to an empty hash if $hash{a} doesn't already exist. (If it does exist and isn't a hash reference, perl will throw an error and ...


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Try this: SELECT ic.[min] FROM [dbo].[ICov] AS ic WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM [dbo].[cov] AS c WHERE ic.[geog] = c.[geog] AND c.geolevel = ic.study_geolevel AND c.min < ic.min)


2

I wouldn't worry about optimization since hash lookups are fast. But for your first case, you can do: if (my $v = $hash{$key}) { print "have $key => $v\n"; } Similarly: if ( ($v = $hash{key1}) && ($v = $v->{key2}) ) { print "Got $v\n"; }


2

Using the count method is fine. To save a bit of code, you might use find_one instead: return 1 if $cache->find_one( { "key" => $key->key } ); Both of these have about the same amount of network overhead, requiring at least two roundtrips to send the query and retrieve the results from the cursor. You might save yourself a little processing ...


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I would use App::objects('model') as of 2.x (Not sure when this was implemented). class AppController extents Controller { private function _modelExists($modelName){ $models = App::objects('model'); return in_array($modelName,$models); } } //Somewhere in your logic if($this->_modelExists('SomeModel')){ //do model exists ...


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If you want to escape table or column names then use backticks select `group` from table1 A static string must be included in quotes select * from users where name = 'john' And the syntax of every DB engine is a little bit different. The above works for MySQL, but SQL-Server has a different syntax. There you use brackets [] to escape names. But you ...


3

Put a case statement around it: SELECT item.id, item.f1, item.f2, item.f3, (case when EXISTS (select sub.id from schema.subitem sub where sub.item_id = item.id AND type='standard' ) then 1 else 0 end) as has_standard FROM schema.item item;


1

This is usually achieved using LEFT JOIN: SELECT r.* FROM request r JOIN user u ON r.user_id = u.user_id LEFT JOIN u1 ON u1.user_id != u.user_id AND u1.company_id = u.company_id LEFT JOIN request r1 ON r1.user_id = u1.user_id WHERE r1.user_id IS NULL By "where" we say that we don't want "users with same company, who has at least 1 request"


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It appears that the issue has to do (at least in mine and a few others) with invalid (corrupt?) innodb log files. Generally speaking, they simply need to be recreated. Here are solutions, most of which require a restart of mysql. Recreate your log files (Delete and restart mysql) Resize your log files (MySql 5.6+ will regenerate the file for you) If you ...


3

Your if() statement isn't the problem, you need to quote the object passed to exists(). > AnObject <- seq(1:10) > exists(AnObject) Error in exists(AnObject) : invalid first argument > exists("AnObject") [1] TRUE


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Generally speaking id should only be used as a row identifier and not compared using MAX(). If you want one row with the greatest weight between two values: SELECT id, weight FROM weight WHERE weight BETWEEN 0 AND 60 ORDER BY weight DESC LIMIT 1 I would not use EXISTS in this instance. UPDATE If you cannot use LIMIT then: SELECT id, ...


1

Call Bundle bundle = Platform.getBundle("org.eclipse.jdt.junit.core"); to find the bundle / plugin, null will be returned if the bundle is not installed. You can also check the bundle is active with: if (bundle.getState() == Bundle.ACTIVE)


1

Don`t instantiate the Category object. You can do the following: $model = Category::where('id', '=', $cat)->firstOrFail(); and register an exception with a redirect use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\ModelNotFoundException; App::error(function(ModelNotFoundException $e) { return Response::make('Not Found', 404); }); Also here is an article for ...


1

This is a good question. Especially as in Oracle you can convert every EXISTS clause into an IN clause and vice versa, because Oracle's IN clause can deal with tuples (where (abc) in (select x,y,z from ...), which most other dbms cannot. And your reasoning is good. Yes, with the IN clause you suggest to load all the subquery's data once instead of looking ...


0

IF EXISTS(SELECT Client, StoreType FROM tableFoo WHERE StoreType = 1) SELECT Client, StoreType FROM tableFoo WHERE StoreType = 1 ELSE IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT Client, StoreType FROM tableFoo WHERE StoreType = 1) SELECT Client, StoreType FROM tableFoo WHERE StoreType = 2


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SELECT Client, StoreType FROM YourTable AS t1 WHERE StoreType = 1 OR (NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM YourTable AS t2 WHERE t1.Client = t2.Client AND t2.StoreType = 1) AND StoreType = 2) DEMO


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Similar to David's answer but even slimmer: if ( obj.filter(el).length ) { // obj contains el }


1

You have a couple of options. Quickest way: On Error Resume Next On Error Resume Next For i = 1 To Worksheets.Count Sheets(i).Shapes("Option Button 1").ControlFormat.Value = xlOn 'opt button reset Sheets(i).Shapes("CheckBox1").ControlFormat.Value = xlOff 'cb reset Next i Loop through objects and match name For i = 1 To Worksheets.Count For ...


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Try this out and let me know. DECLARE @Data AS TABLE ( OrgId INT, ThingId INT ) DECLARE @ReplacementData AS TABLE ( OldThingId INT, NewThingId INT ) INSERT INTO @Data (OrgId, ThingId) VALUES (1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 1), (2, 4), (3, 3), (3, 4) INSERT INTO @ReplacementData (OldThingId, NewThingId) VALUES (3, 4), (2, ...



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