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for /f "tokens=*" %%v IN (%LIST2%) do ( echo Checking %%v... set "COMP=%%~v" set "SYMPATH=" for %%P in ( "program files (x86)\symantec\symantec endpoint protection" "program files\symantec\symantec endpoint protection" "program files (x86)\symantec antivirus\smc.exe" "program files\symantec antivirus" ) do if not defined SYMPATH if ...


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Another way of achieving the same, in case you you want to call it for multiple rows and want to use data from Table in procedure B- PROCEDURE stored_proc_b IS BEGIN FOR rec IN (SELECT COL1 FROM <<TABLE1>> T1 WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM <<TABLE2>> T2...WHERE T1.JOIN_COL = T2.JOIN_COL)) LOOP stored_proc_a; END ...


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The correct way of doing this is the following: PROCEDURE stored_proc_b IS num_rows number; BEGIN select COUNT(*) into num_rows FROM my_table WHERE my_table.xyz = 123; -- (whatever is appropriate) if num_rows < 1 then stored_proc_a; end if; END; Figured this out ...


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FOR /F "tokens=*" %%v IN (%LIST2%) DO ( ... SET "SYMPATH=" if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if exist "\\%%v\c$\..." SET "SYMPATH=..." & CALL :MIGRATE if not defined ...


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For checking the record is available on collection or not just follow the following example var query=connection.query("select * from table") q .on('error') { ...`enter code here` } .on('result') { //check for null } };


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The MySQL query is not synchronous/blocking. You need to pass a callback to query() and move the logic after the query inside that callback. Take a look at the first example in the mysql readme.


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This will return the category id, if it exists, and 0 if it does not. SET @CategoryID = null; SELECT @CategoryID = t0.Categoryid FROM Categories AS [t0] WHERE [t0].Categoryname = @CategoryName; IF @CategoryID IS NULL SET @CategoryID = 0; SELECT @CategoryID AS [value]; However, I would recommend just returning null if it doesn't exist, or returning ...


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If I understand your task you can left join your tableA to check for existence of particular record - if record doesn't exist you will have NULL for joined values, otherwise you'll have some value. Then in case NULL value you can replace it with a value from tableB. Something like this: SELECT COALESCE(tA.address1, tB.address1, N'N/A') AS address1 FROM ...


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Try this amusing exception. Remember there's no BEGIN and END, so the next statement after the IF should be conditional. Now ask yourself why the first variable exists: declare @check binary declare @predeclared varchar(100) select @check = 0 if @check = 1 declare @conditionaldeclare nvarchar(4000) select @conditionaldeclare = 'conditionaldeclare' ...


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You can just specify the absolute path, if the directory/directories doesn't exits, it will create the drectory/directories. private void createDirectoryIfNeeded(String directoryName) { File theDir = new File(directoryName); if (!theDir.exists()) theDir.mkdirs(); }


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The example is a double-nested NOT EXISTS query. If a subquery returns any rows at all, EXISTS subquery is TRUE, and NOT EXISTS subquery is FALSE. That is, it has a NOT EXISTS clause within a NOT EXISTS clause. It is easier to say that a nested NOT EXISTS answers the question “is x TRUE for all y?” --Part 3 SELECT r.index, SUM(c.points) FROM ...


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Always analyze the query from the inside out. Innermost query: Select the exams with score higher than 5 Middle one: Select the required courses that don't have an exam with score higher than 5 Outer one: Select students that don't have a required course that doesn't have the exam with score higher than 5


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Your test on OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#attributeType') works fine. You can test it by running it separately, without a drop and create in the same batch. The problem is that SQL Server parses the entire batch before it runs it. If it knows that #attributeType exists it will give an error for: SELECT * INTO #attributeType Even if you drop the table in the ...


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All PORT_ID values from PORTS whose values exist in the HOME_PORT_ID column of the SHIPS table are returned. Your query, which queries SHIPS once for every row in PORTS, can be rewritten more efficiently as: SELECT PORT_ID FROM PORTS WHERE PORT_ID IN (SELECT HOME_PORT_ID FROM SHIPS) which only queries SHIPS once. But it can be rewritten even more ...


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Only the rows in ports that have a matching line in ships (using predicate P1.PORT_ID = S1.HOME_PORT_ID) will show up. That means that if there is no row in ships with the same port_id, the rows of ports will not be shown.


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Not sure if i understand you at 100%, so i'm providing 2 versions of the code - feel free to try them both. Version 1: Checks if the post has been assigned to a term "webdesign" of the taxonomy "category": if ( has_term('webdesign', 'category') ) { $website = get_post_meta(get_the_ID(), 'Website_URL', 1); echo '<li>' . $website . ...


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You can use function_exists() to check if one of the mcrypt functions exists. if(function_exists("mcrypt_encrypt")) { echo "mcrypt is loaded!"; } else { echo "mcrypt isn't loaded!"; }


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In order to add a key-value pair to an existing array just do it like the key exists there. $array["list"]["serwer-2"] = 7; Then you will get desired result.


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I'm not familiar with Oracle in itself, but using standard SQL queries, couldn't you do the following? SELECT t.parent_id, t.child_id, t.address FROM mytable t LEFT JOIN mytable t2 on t.parent_id=t2.parent_id where t2.address LIKE :p_search_criteria;


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You could do this with analytic functions, if you wanted: SELECT parent_id, child_id, address FROM (select t.*, max(case when address LIKE :p_search_criteria then 1 else 0 end) over (partition by parent_id) as addrflag from mytable t ) t WHERE addrflag = 1; If you have the right indexes, then the exists ...


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Although it appears you have a solution and very good time, Havenard has a good point about not necessarilyt getting correct per sensor. I would propose the following. On your temps table, have an index on (sensor, dt), then, your first from will be a select grouped by each sensor, so each sensor appears once with its respective date/time. Then, use that ...


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Yes, your query is about the optimum. I just simplified and removed the redundant cast: SELECT name , EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM "Followings" f WHERE f."FollowedId" = u."id" AND f."FollowerId" = 123 ) AS "isFollowed" FROM "Users" u ORDER BY "createdAt" LIMIT 15; The cast to ::boolean was redundant, since ...


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The problem with IN (SELECT subquery) is that MySQL "optimizes" it with what is often a very poor performance choice. According to the documentation, a query with a template like this: WHERE outer_expr IN (SELECT inner_expr FROM ... WHERE subquery_where) Is automatically converted by the optimizer to this: WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM ...


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It turns out both EXISTS and IN aren't the optimal solution. After having a play around I came up with the following: SELECT distinct t.dt as 'Log Time', sn.name as 'Snake Name', sen.type as 'Sensor Type', t.temp as Temperature FROM (SELECT * FROM temps ORDER BY dt DESC) as t JOIN sensors as sen ON ...


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You are right, IN subqueries are usually slower than EXISTS. EXISTS works differently because you can use previous columns directly in it. You can also improve by using LIMIT to limit your subset to only the amount you really need. When using EXISTS, it doesn't matter what you select because it just asks: is there at least 1 row returned or not. Make sure ...


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Sorry I'm a somewhat new to SQL and SO, but I found a solution that works when there is a tie for highest avg(stars) (or more specially an unknown amount of ties, in which case you can't easily set a limit for the ordered output). Like I said, I'm kinda nooby so its a little messy: select title, avg(stars) from movie join rating using(mID) where mID not in ...



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