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195

Exponentiation by squaring. int ipow(int base, int exp) { int result = 1; while (exp) { if (exp & 1) result *= base; exp >>= 1; base *= base; } return result; } This is the standard method for doing modular exponentiation for huge numbers in asymmetric cryptography.


176

The ^ operator in Java ^ in Java is the exclusive-or ("xor") operator. Let's take 5^6 as example: (decimal) (binary) 5 = 101 6 = 110 ------------------ xor 3 = 011 This the truth table for bitwise (JLS 15.22.1) and logical (JLS 15.22.2) xor: ^ | 0 1 ^ | F T --+----- --+----- 0 | 0 1 F | F T 1 | 1 0 T ...


74

There are actually three exponentiation operators: (^), (^^) and (**). ^ is non-negative integral exponentiation, ^^ is integer exponentiation, and ** is floating-point exponentiation: (^) :: (Num a, Integral b) => a -> b -> a (^^) :: (Fractional a, Integral b) => a -> b -> a (**) :: Floating a => a -> a -> a The reason is type ...


67

classic recursion (watch this, it blows stack) (defn exp [x n] (if (zero? n) 1 (* x (exp x (dec n))))) tail recursion (defn exp [x n] (loop [acc 1 n n] (if (zero? n) acc (recur (* x acc) (dec n))))) functional (defn exp [x n] (reduce * (repeat n x))) sneaky (also blows stack, but not so easily) (defn exp-s [x n] ...


63

As many people have already pointed out, it's the XOR operator. Many people have also already pointed out that if you want exponentiation then you need to use Math.pow. But I think it's also useful to note that ^ is just one of a family of operators that are collectively known as bitwise operators: Operator Name Example Result Description a ...


54

Clojure has a power function that works well: I'd recommend using this rather than going via Java interop since it handles all the Clojure arbitrary-precision number types correctly. It's called expt for exponentiation rather than power or pow which maybe explains why it's a bit hard to find..... anyway here's a small example: (use 'clojure.contrib.math) ...


37

Exponentiation by squaring uses only O(lg q) multiplications. template <typename T> T expt(T p, unsigned q) { T r(1); while (q != 0) { if (q % 2 == 1) { // q is odd r *= p; q--; } p *= p; q /= 2; } return r; } This should work on any monoid (T, operator*) where a T ...


36

You can use java's Math.pow or BigInteger.pow methods: (Math/pow base exponent) (.pow (bigint base) exponent)


29

A pretty fast one might be something like this: int IntPow(int x, uint pow) { int ret = 1; while ( pow != 0 ) { if ( (pow & 1) == 1 ) ret *= x; x *= x; pow >>= 1; } return ret; } Note that this does not allow negative powers. I'll leave that as an exercise to you. :) Added: Oh yes, almost ...


26

Note that exponentiation by squaring is not the most optimal method. It is probably the best you can do as a general method that works for all exponent values, but for a specific exponent value there might be a better sequence that needs fewer multiplications. For instance, if you want to compute x^15, the method of exponentiation by squaring will give you: ...


23

It's bitwise XOR, Java does not have an exponentiation operator, you would have to use Math.pow() instead.


21

Calculate ab by the following iterations: a1 = a1, a2 = a2, ... ai = ai, ... ab = ab You have ai+1 = ai×a. Calcluate each ai not exactly. The thing is that the relative error of ab is less than n times relative error of a. You want to get final relative error less than 10-n. Thus relative error on each step may be . Remove last digits at each step. ...


21

It's because 1e6 is a constant, and is recognized as such by the parser, whereas 10^6 is parsed as a function call which has to be further evaluated (by a call to the function ^()). Since the former avoids the expensive overhead of a function call, evaluating it is a lot faster! class(substitute(1e6)) # [1] "numeric" class(substitute(10^6)) # [1] "call" ...


20

Haskell's type system isn't powerful enough to express the three exponentiation operators as one. What you'd really want is something like this: class Exp a b where (^) :: a -> b -> a instance (Num a, Integral b) => Exp a b where ... -- current ^ instance (Fractional a, Integral b) => Exp a b where ... -- current ^^ instance (Floating a, ...


17

Normal types in C can usually only store up to 64 bits, so you'll have to store big numbers in an array, for example, and write mathematical operations yourself. But you shouldn't reinvent the wheel here - you could try the GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library for this purpose. And as the comments already pointed out, the ^ operation is binary XOR. For ...


17

The problem is that 1/3 uses integer (truncating) division, the result of which is zero. Change your code to Math.pow(8, 1./3); (The . turns the 1. into a floating-point literal.)


16

Using the math in John Cook's blog link, public static long IntPower(int x, short power) { if (power == 0) return 1; if (power == 1) return x; // ---------------------- int n = 15; while ((power <<= 1) >= 0) n--; long tmp = x; while (--n > 0) tmp = tmp * tmp * ...


16

Math.pow(10, precision); // fill up space


15

Not in the standard library. But you can easily write one yourself (using exponentiation by squaring to be fast), or reuse an extended library that provides this. In Batteries, it is Int.pow. Below is a proposed implementation: let rec pow a = function | 0 -> 1 | 1 -> a | n -> let b = pow a (n / 2) in b * b * (if n mod 2 = 0 then 1 ...


14

Theoretically, hammar's answer and duffymo's answer are good guesses. But in practice, on my machine, it's not more efficient: >>> import timeit >>> timeit.timeit(stmt='[n ** 0.5 for n in range(100)]', setup='import math', number=10000) 0.15518403053283691 >>> timeit.timeit(stmt='[math.sqrt(n) for n in range(100)]', setup='import ...


14

Here is the method in Java private int ipow(int base, int exp) { int result = 1; while (exp != 0) { if ((exp & 1) == 1) result *= base; exp >>= 1; base *= base; } return result; }


14

Exponentiation by squaring might be worth taking a look at...


13

Unless this is homework, you probably don't want to roll your own implementation of arbitrary precision exponentiation. Calculating large exponents of the type you describe is complicated - performance aside. I would recommend using one of the existing arbitrary precision arithmetic libraries, like GMP - most of which have libraries to access them from C#. ...


13

If you mean in XCode, you have to #include <math.h> and then you can use pow: double res=pow(10, 1.5);


12

Give a man a fish, and you'll feed him for a day, teach a man to fish, and you'll feed him for a lifetime. Jonno, you should learn how to let GHC's error messages help you, and the "undefined drop in" method (let's focus on that for now). ghci> let numbers = [[519432,525806],[632382,518061]] ghci> -- so far so good.. ghci> let prob99 = maximum ...


12

It is the XOR bitwise operator.


12

Assuming that ^ means exponentiation and that q is runtime variable, use std::pow(double, int). EDIT: For completeness due to the comments on this answer: I asked the question Why was std::pow(double, int) removed from C++0x? about the missing function and in fact pow(double, int) wasn't removed in C++0x, just the language was changed. However, it appears ...


12

The thing is python tries to print the first result. But this number has a zillion digits and python doesn't flush the output until a newline is encountered, which is after sending all the digits to standard output. As @abarnert mentioned, what is many times worse, is converting the number to string for printing it. This needs considerable memory allocation ...


11

There isn't an operator but you can use the pow function like this: return pow(num, power) If you want to, you could also make an operator call the pow function like this: infix operator ** { associativity left precedence 170 } func ** (num: Double, power: Double) -> Double{ return pow(num, power) } 2.0**2.0 //4.0


11

You forgot important parentheses. Here are the timings after correcting that: system.time(expr = replicate(10000, (1:10000) ** (1/2))) #user system elapsed #4.76 0.32 5.12 system.time(expr = replicate(10000, sqrt(1:10000))) #user system elapsed #2.67 0.57 3.31



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