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You're not using the grid in the correct way. WPF Grids have a property that allows to set columns and rows. Then, you would put elements inside the grid and set in which row/column they should go. Of course you can have grids inside grid and so on. You can then play with the Width="2*" and things like that to make columns larger or smaller than other, ...


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here you go I made use of HeaderedContentControl which allows you to have a header and a content which you can further use in a template of your preference <HeaderedContentControl x:Class="CSharpWPF.MyUserControl" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" ...


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Although the answer that proposes attaching the animation directly to the element to be animated solves this problem in simple cases, this isn't really workable when you have a complex animation that needs to target multiple elements. (You can attach an animation to each element of course, but it gets pretty horrible to manage.) So there's an alternative ...


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Up in your namespaces you should have something like mc:Ignorable="d" where next to it you can put d:DesignWidth="1000" (or whatever size you want) to expand the area only for design time. You can do the same with Height if you like via d:DesignHeight Hope this helps, cheers.


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Does the arc have to be an image? Assuming it isn't, the way to do this in WPF is to create a Path, you can do this in Blend using the Pen tool (http://i.stack.imgur.com/IlhYq.png). Note: If something is supposed to be a button, it's usually a good idea to add it as a Control Template for a Button control. You can do this in Blend by adding a button and ...



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