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17

Byte 189 represents a "½" in iso-8859-1 (aka "Latin-1"), so the following is maybe what you want: var e = Encoding.GetEncoding("iso-8859-1"); var s = e.GetString(new byte[] { 189 }); All strings and chars in .NET are UTF-16 encoded, so you need to use an encoder/decoder to convert anything else, sometimes this is defaulted (e.g. UTF-8 for FileStream ...


13

Please remember that there is no such thing as extended ASCII. ASCII was and is only defined between 0 and 127. Everything above that is either invalid or needs to be in a defined encoding other than ASCII (for example ISO-8859-1). Please read The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No ...


10

What you want is to be able to print unicode, and the answer is in perldoc perluniintro. You can use \x{nnnn} where n is the hex identifier, or you can do \N{...} with the name: perl -E 'say "\x{2514}"; use charnames; say "\N{BOX DRAWINGS LIGHT UP AND RIGHT}"'


9

Since the extended ASCII characters have value 128 and higher, you can just call ord on individual characters and handle those with a value >= 128. The following code reads from stdin and prints only the extended ASCII characters: while (<>) { while (/(.)/g) { print($1) if (ord($1) >= 128); } } Alternatively, unpack together with chr will ...


9

Console mode apps are restricted to an 8-bit code page encoding. The default on many machines is IBM437, the code page that matches the old IBM PC character set. You can change the code page by assigning the OutputEncoding property: Console.OutputEncoding = Encoding.UTF8; But now you typically have a problem with the font. Consoles default to ...


8

It depends on exactly what the encoding is. There's no such thing as "ASCII 189" - ASCII only goes up to 127. There are many encodings which a 8-bit encodings using ASCII for the first 128 values. You may want Encoding.Default (which is the default encoding for your particular system), but it's hard to know for sure. Where did your data come from?


8

To use exactly these codes your terminal must support Code Page 437, which contains frames. Alternatively you can use derived CP850 with less boxing characters. Such boxing characters also exist as Unicode Block Elements. The char which you want in perl is noted as \N{U+2514}. More details in perlunicode


7

These are not in ASCII nor in LATIN1 for instance.


6

Char can be signed or unsigned. This doesn't really matter, though. You actually want to check if each character is valid ASCII. This is a positive, non-ambiguous check. You simply check if each char is both >=0 and <= 127. Anything else (whether positive or negative, "Extended ASCII" or UTF-8) is invalid.


6

The first printable ASCII character is space (32). The last printable ASCII character is ~ (126). So I'd probably use while (<>) { print "$.\n" if /[^ -~]/; } although it will, admittedly, also display lines containing control characters as well as extended ASCII. Edit: Changed to print the line number rather than the line itself.


6

ASCII ASCII was less or more the first character encoding ever. At the ages when a byte was very expensive and 1MHz was extremely fast, only the characters which appeared on those ancient US typewriters (as well as at the average US International keyboard nowadays) were covered by the charset of the ASCII character encoding. This includes the complete Latin ...


5

printf("\xf2\n"); If that doesn't work, it's because of DOS and code pages. Try playing with the CHCP command. You're strolling into locales/platform-specific/give-up-now territory.


5

This is caused by displaying UTF-8 page as Latin-1. For example, ± is encoded as 0xB1 in Latin-1 but 0xC2, 0xB1 in UTF-8. 0xC2 happens to be Â. This is kind of strange for a JSP page. Normally, JSP will use the same encoding in the writer and "Content-Type" header so you always get the same encoding. Check if you specifies encoding like this, <%@page ...


5

You would like to treat line as ASCII-encoded data, so the answer is to decode it to text using the ascii codec: line.decode('ascii') This will raise errors for data that is not in fact ASCII-encoded. This is how to ignore those errors: line.decode('ascii', 'ignore'). This gives you text, in the form of a unicode instance. If you would rather work with ...


5

“ASCII to NSData” makes no sense, because ASCII is an encoding; if you have encoded characters, then you have data. An encoding is a transformation of ideal Unicode characters (code points) into one-or-more-byte units (code units), possibly in sequences such as UTF-16's surrogate pairs. An NSString is more or less an ideal Unicode object. It contains the ...


5

The old PC-8 or Extended ASCII character set was around before IBM and Microsoft introduced the idea of Code Pages to the PC world. This WAS Extended ASCII - in 1982. In fact, it was the ONLY character set available on PC's at the time, up until the EGA card allowed you to load other fonts in to VRAM. This was also the default standard for ANSI terminals, ...


5

Unidecode might be of use to you. Python 3.2.3 (default, Jun 8 2012, 05:36:09) [GCC 4.7.0 20120507 (Red Hat 4.7.0-5)] on linux2 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> from unidecode import unidecode >>> unidecode("æ, ö or ç") 'ae, o or c'


5

char is signed on your platform. 250 is out of range for a signed character. You want: if (symbol == static_cast<char>(250)) Otherwise symbol will be promoted to an integer. Alternatively, use unsigned char instead of char which may or may not be signed.


5

ASCII is a 7-bit code. The interpretation of byte values above 128 is dependent upon the OS, your locale/language settings, and so on. They are not standard. Under Windows in English, they are most commonly defined by CP1252; on Linux they are more commonly ISO-8859-1. Some OSs use UTF-8, which is not a character set itself but a way to encode Unicode into ...


4

Try print line.decode('iso-8859-1').encode('ascii', 'ignore') -- that should be much closer to what you want.


4

That looks like the Code page 437 encoding. Perl is probably just outputting bytes that you give it. And your terminal is probably expecting UTF8. So you need to decode it to Unicode, then re-encode it in UTF-8. EDIT: Correct encoding.


4

After much poring over man printf and info printf, I think I've gotten this to work. The basic issue seems to be that bash has a built-in printf that doesn't work. And, despite what the man/info pages, say, \U doesn't work. \u still does, though. env printf '\u2502' gets me a vertical box character.


4

public class ConsoleRectangle { private int hWidth; private int hHieght; private Point hLocation; private ConsoleColor hBorderColor; public ConsoleRectangle(int width, int hieght, Point location, ConsoleColor borderColor) { hWidth = width; hHieght = hieght; hLocation = location; hBorderColor = ...


4

It looks like CP437 or CP852, assuming the \x82 sequences encode single characters, and are not literally four characters. Well, at least everything else does, but the last line is a bit of a puzzle.


4

The problem is that the characters you are entering are NOT in the ASCII range at all. VARCHAR(20) is the wrong column datatype for your data. Change your table structure Change the way you insert Finally, change the way you SELECT Fixed: create table testasci(id int,name nvarchar(20)) insert into testasci values(1,N'santosh'); insert into testasci ...


4

It appears to come straight from Code Page 437.


3

Embed the character in the string using C's hex notation: print(0x0f, 0, 0, "\xfe"); As folks have pointed out, you might want to pretty up the code a bit, perhaps by adding a symbolic name for the VGA framebuffer base address.


3

There is no way to make str() work with Unicode in Python < 3.0. Use repr(obj) instead of str(obj). repr() will convert the result to ASCII, properly escaping everything that isn't in the ASCII code range. Other than that, use a file object which allows unicode. So don't encode at the input side but at the output side: fileObj = codecs.open( ...



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