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35

Today I would say Prism and MEF complement each other. Just as Prism and Unity. Prism introduces a set of specific services like RegionManager, DelegateCommand, and EventAggregator which aid in building composite apps. MEF on the other hand is a more general composition mechanism for extensibility of applications and frameworks whether they are composites or ...


27

As of .NET 3.5 there's a formalized, baked-in way to create and load plugins from a .NET application. It's all in the System.AddIn namespace. For more information you can check out this article on MSDN: Add-ins and Extensibility


25

The Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF) is a new library in .NET that enables greater reuse of applications and components. Using MEF, .NET applications can make the shift from being statically compiled to dynamically composed. If you are building extensible applications, extensible frameworks and application extensions, then MEF is for you. http://www....


24

The NuGet Package Manager has a NuGet Package Manager Console which is a PowerShell host. Open the console by clicking Tools > Library Package Manager > Package Manager Console. The package manager is automatically installed in Visual Studio 2010 when you install ASP.NET MVC 3. You can install ASP.NET MVC 3 using the Microsoft Web Platform Installer. You ...


21

IF we're talking .NET, try Scripting .NET applications with VBScript over on CodeProject. Lots of concrete examples there. Below are sites implementing various application extension techniques ClearScript - Makes V8, VBScript and JScript available to .NET apps CS-Script - The C# Script Engine Plugin Architecture using C# Opinio plugin architecture Notes ...


18

The following code snippet (C#) constructs an instance of any concrete classes derived from Base found in class libraries (*.dll) in the application path and stores them in a list. using System.IO; using System.Reflection; List<Base> objects = new List<Base>(); DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(Application.StartupPath); foreach (FileInfo ...


16

One of the hard piece of judgement to achieve is how extensible to be. As the boss, I am really irritated when I assign someone a 2 hour task and three days later they're still working on it, because they decided it should be more extensible so they added entries to the config file and columns to tables and had to change 4 or 5 other objects to accomodate ...


16

It's absolutely possible using the Visual Studio Extensibility tools. You'll want to create a VS Package. There are a few different mechanisms (macros, add-ins, and packages) you can use to extend Visual Studio, but Packages are by far the most powerful. More specifically, you should look into creating a "Custom Editor/Designer". You'll need to ...


15

Here's one: http://www.codeplex.com/ResourceRefactoring It'a actually a Microsoft "open source" Visual Studio(2005 and up) tool that integrates with the IDE. You can easily replace every occurence of a string with a ressource reference with a few clicks.


14

Thanks to this and subsequenbtly this, I found what I was looking for. IParameterInspector does not need to be at the IOperationBehavior level. They can be at the IServiceBehavior level. In the service level ApplyDispatchBehavior method you need to loop through all its operations and assign the inspector behaviour. My class in full... [AttributeUsage(...


13

I'm not sure what this has to do with VS extensibility, but it's certainly possible to invoke a method with an out parameter by reflection and find out the out parameter's value afterwards: using System; using System.Reflection; class Test { static void Main() { MethodInfo method = typeof(int).GetMethod ("TryParse", new Type[] { ...


12

Frankly speaking there are not so many good approaches to make your application modular (I think this is the proper way to rephrase your requirements). Please also note, there were so many discussions, failed attempts and strange designs to simplify development of modular applications, but still we have so many monolithic monsters. I've been supporting ...


12

In general, in Go, if you need events you probably need to use channels, but if you need plugins, the way to go is interfaces. Here's a bit lengthy example of a simple plugin architecture that minimizes the code that needs to be written in the app's main file to add plugins (this can be automated but not dnyamic, see below). I hope it's in the direction ...


11

Try using safemode > devenv.exe /SafeMode This will start Visual Studio with all add-ins/extensions disabled.


10

MEF would be a good place to start. Glenn Block's article Managed Extensibility Framework: Building Composable Apps in .NET 4 with the Managed Extensibility Framework provides a good overview. BTW, don't be fooled by the title - you can also get MEF for .NET 3.5 SP1.


9

OSGI is a good practical example of a technical framework allowing to do what you are after. The theory is here. The (free!) book is there. Extensibility and the ability to write plugin must deal with service lifecycle adding / removing service/plugin on the spot managing dependencies between services managing states of services (declared, installed, ...


9

MEF is definitely the simplest option of the three. It was really designed with this exact scenario (extensible applications) in mind. It's actually the "plugin" mechanism used by Visual Studio, which is a WPF application. All you need to do is have your "plugin" implement an interface or derive from a known base class, and add the [Export] attribute. ...


9

OK what you need to do is (without prescribing for performance, this is just to see it working) public class GeneralController : Controller { [Import] public ITranslator Translator { get; set; } public JsonResult Translate(string text) { var container = new CompositionContainer( new DirectoryCatalog(Path.Combine(HttpRuntime....


8

Just use interfaces. Define an IPlugin that every plugin must implement, and use a well defined messaging layer to allow the plugin to make changes in the main program. You may want to look at a program like Mediaportal or Meedios which heavily depend on user plugins.


8

Your last two points are quite accurate - you don't need multiple developers to have your stuff messed with. If you work on a project long enough, you'll realize you've forgotten much of what you did at the beginning. One of the most important reasons for hiding something is so that you can safely change it later. If a field is public, and several months ...


8

We create private methods so that consumers of our classes don't have to care about implementation details - they can focus on the few nifty things our classes provide for them. Moreover, we're obligated to consider every possible use of public methods. By making methods private, we reduce the number of features a class has to support, and we have more ...


8

You can intercept any command coming from the Visual Studio UI in VSPackage. To do this, you should subscribe to the desired event of DTE.Events.CommandEvents. You have to pass GUID and Id to CommandEvents. private void Initialize() { var dte = GetService(typeof(SDTE)) as EnvDTE.DTE; _startCommandEvents = dte.Events.CommandEvents["{5EFC7975-14BC-11CF-...


8

Edit: Do not read this answer. It is embarrassingly wrong. I am fail. Read Glenn Block's below. It's not obvious, but this is the same question: Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF) vs. Composite UI Application Block (CAB) Consensus in the duplicate post is that MEF and Prism provide the same basic set of functionality in different ways, except that Prism ...


8

There are two very interesting project available: A powershell command shell called Power Console: http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/67620d8c-93dd-4e57-aa86-c9404acbd7b3 The integration of the PowerGui script editor (the best!) into Visual Studio: http://powerguivsx.codeplex.com/ Check them out, together they will fulfill all you needs:-...


8

There are quite a few class of applications that REQUIRE extensibility to be truly useful and succeed in gaining mindshare. Two of the biggest classes of applications that I've personally worked with that require extensibility are IDEs and Content Management Systems (CMS). Microsoft is creating MEF to be a end all solution when you need to support ...


7

VS Command Shell


7

Well, I'd guess that 99.9% of all open-source projects have just one developer -- The originator creates it and opens it to the public, lot of people use it and virtually no one contributes or even bothers looking at the source code. I'd say write it in whatever language you feel best. (SpamBayes a really useful and widely used SPAM filtering program was ...


7

Dynamically Loading Plug-ins For information on how to dynamically load .NET assemblies see this question (and my answer). Here is some code for loading creating an AppDomain and loading an assembly into it. var domain = AppDomain.CreateDomain("NewDomainName"); var pathToDll = @"C:\myDll.dll"; var t = typeof(TypeIWantToLoad); var runnable = domain....


7

It all comes down to encapsulation. This means hiding the insides of the class and just caring about what it does. If you want to have a credit card processing class, you don't really care 'how' it processes the credit card. You just want to be able to go: $creditCardProcessor->charge(10.99, $creditCardNumber); and expect it to work. By making some ...


7

The reason for the three exports is the fact that you derive your custom export metadata from the ExportAttribute. This means that for each decoration a different export is taking place. Three decorations lead to three exports. I'm not sure why you get all {Name,Version} pairs for each export. To overcome the three exports you can update your custom ...



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