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8

You can write an overload of your existing method like this: public static void WriteCSVData<T, TValue>(this T[,] data, StreamWriter sw, Func<T,TValue> func) { for (int row = 0; row < data.GetLength(0); row++) for (int col = 0; col < data.GetLength(1); col++) { string s = func(data[row, ...


6

You can't tell from just the signature. The best you can do is to investigate the actual code, for example by looking at the .NET Reference Source. Another thing you could do is check the return type. If it is the same as the one it's being called on, it probably doesn't change it, it most likely returns a new instance. Is it a void, then it probably does ...


6

Method resolution says that closer is better. See the blog post for exact rules. What does the closer mean? Compiler will see if it can find exact match, if it can't find for some reason it will find next possible compatible methods and so forth. Let's first make that method compile by removing the SomeInterface constraint. public static class ...


6

A List<Topic> is not a List<IBusinessObject>, even though Topic implements IBusinessObject; that's because List<T> is not covariant (and anyway, only interfaces and delegates can be covariant, not classes). If it was, it could cause all sorts of problems; for instance, consider this (hypothetical) extension method: public static void ...


5

The Contains static method is defined inside System.Linq. If you add the line using System.Linq; at the top of your file, your code should compile. Incidentally, isn't the Contains method identical to Python's 'in' operator? You don't really gain much from creating a custom method, except that you get to type a few less characters/get to reverse the ...


4

public static SecureString GetSecureString(string password) { SecureString secureString = new SecureString(); foreach (char c in password) { secureString.AppendChar(c); } secureString.MakeReadOnly(); return secureString; } You can make same thing without unsafe code.


3

How can I pass an extension method as an argument to the constructor of a class... ? Make the argument a delegate that matches the signature you're looking for. For example, Func<IEnumerable<FileInfo>, IEnumerable<FileInfo>> would work in the case you gave. public MainFileInfoSource(List<DirectoryInfo> Directories, ...


3

This works for me - did you include a using statement for the System.Reactive.Linq namespace (where SubscribeOn is defined)? Synchronization.ObserveOn is in a different namespace (System.Reactive.Concurrency) - which I suspect you have a using statement for already.


2

You can check for the Pure attribute in the class decoration as Steven Liekens said. But in its absence, the only way to know for sure is by: Experimenting: for example, get an instance of the class and serialize it. Use the method and then serialize it. Compare the results. May not be accurate every time. Reverse engineering the method: and I hope you ...


2

One way is to find out if the method or its class is marked as [Pure]. Pure code does not modify input values.


2

In the last line of SelectNested you only return the first parent: yield return SelectNestedParents(parent, selector).FirstOrDefault(); You have to return all parents: foreach (var p in SelectNestedParents(parent, selector)) return p; Instead of using recursion you can use iteration which probably is more efficient: public static ...


2

It's an argument which has some merit, but in lots of cases the problems can be avoided: If you control your code and can easily update it if necessary, then you can easily write unit tests to detect the problem and correct it if it occurs. (I assume you'd be validating any update to the external library before deploying it anyway.) If you trust the ...


2

Extension methods are resolved according to the static type of the variable on which they're called, not the run-time type. So the answer to your question is "no" -- you have to do it via an override in the derived class, or by cumbersome type checking, as you indicate in your question.


2

Both datatable columns and the generic class property names needs to be the same even and case sensitive. I need to modify this to handle the situation where case is not taken into consideration ex: EmployeeName = employeename. That part is easy. You can compare the Name's case-insensitively: var commonProperties = propertyList .Where(p => ...


1

I am not sure if you need unsafe code in that case (see answer of @mybirthname). But when unsafe code is needed, it can be enabled in Project properties. In the main menu, click Project and then <ProjectName> properties... Click on the Build page. Select Allow unsafe code. Or one can specify /unsafe compiler option explicitly.


1

Try this: [IntEx]::ListPowersOf(1,2) or [IntEx] | gm to list available methods/properties. You can also use reflection to obtain list of exported types to see if yours is available: [Reflection.Assembly]::LoadFile('C:path\to.dll')|select -ExpandProperty ExportedTypes


1

They don't supply it for a limited time. The dropdown you're looking at refers to the period of time that their support service is available for.


1

Define a delegate with parameter type T and return type string. Add a parameter to method WriteCSVData with type the delegate. delegate string ExtractValueDelegate<T>(T obj); public static void WriteCSVData<T>(this T[,] data,ExtractValueDelegte<T> extractor , StreamWriter sw) { ... } // calling the method myData.WriteCSVData(sw, d => ...


1

First, I guess you don't need it. Try to redesign your solution. Second, given examples are about converting of string to something, NOT something to something. I think, this will work for your needs: public static class StringExtension { public static T ConvertTo<T>(this string o) { if (typeof (T) == typeof (Int32)) ...


1

You can do this with a ClientTemplate as follows: columns.Bound(p => p.IsActive) .ClientTemplate("<img src='/Content/#= IsActive ? 'tick.png' : 'cross.png' #''>"); The above simply checks the IsActive property and displays a tick or cross image.


1

Extension methods are quite low in the chain of overload resolution: they are not "close" enough: http://ericlippert.com/2013/12/23/closer-is-better/ You might found this answer useful too: http://stackoverflow.com/a/25564127/863564 It seems to be directly related to your problem.


1

Strictly speaking, your class looks to be a list, not a graph, since selector returns only one object not an enumeration of them. Thus recursion is not necessary. public static IEnumerable<T> SelectNested<T>(this T source, Func<T, T> selector) where T : class { while (source != null) { yield ...


1

The following code should work as expected: public static IEnumerable<T> SelectNested<T>() { if (source != null){ yield return source; var parent = selector(source); // Result of the recursive call is IEnumerable<T> // so you need to iterate over it and return its content. foreach (var parent ...


1

Of course, the risk is there, but defining something on closed or sealed types you have no control over is exactly what extension methods is about. If you'd only create extension methods on types from your own, the effectiveness of extension methods (compared to regular methods) would be minimized. There is a very easy 'solution' for this in naming ...


1

The problem is that c# cannot infer the type of the argument in the anonymous method. it will work if you declare the argument type this way; IjQueryPromise<int> promise; promise.Done( (int r) => DoSomething(r) ); // This should work as expected


1

This isn't an issue with overload resolution. It has nothing to do with a conflict with the other overload. This is an issue with type inference. Your second overload won't be able to infer the type of TResult if you don't indicate the type of the parameter for the lambda, or the type of the entire delegate. This is easy enough to see by simply ...


1

An instance of a List<Topic> is not an instance of a List<IBusinessObject>. While IEnumerable<T> is covariant, List<T> is not. On the other hand, a List<Topic> is also an IEnumerable<Topic>, which is itself an IEnumerable<IBusinessObject>. Therefore if you redefine your extension method as public static ...


1

Extension methods will not be found by the compiler unless they are in a static class. Try putting your JsonNet methods in their own static class called e.g. JsonNetExtensions. Also make sure that your extensions class is either in the same namespace as your controllers, or your controllers have a using statement at the top with the namespace of the ...



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