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29

I find it interesting that none of the responses so far have touched on what I consider to be a fundamental insight into modern development practices, and that is that the "old fashioned" way of writing software by gathering requirements, doing analysis and modelling the desired system before writing any code actually had a lot going for it. TDD actually ...


22

Scrum is a software development methodology, XP is a programming practice. Both are "agile" techniques and are often used together. Scrum outlines a process for identifying and cataloging work that needs to be done, prioritizing that work by communicating with the customer or customer representative, and implementing that work using iterative releases. ...


21

One possibility is Hudson. It's written in Java, but there's integration with Python projects: Hudson embraces Python I've never tried it myself, however. (Update, Sept. 2011: After a trademark dispute Hudson has been renamed to Jenkins.)


20

One obviously way to use a tester is to verify bugs fixes and user stories every sprint. Are there any better ways for an Agile team to utilize a tester. IMO, this wouldn't be very efficient. Mary Poppendieck summarize this very well: "the job of testing is to prevent defects (essentials), not to find defects (waste). She wrote a lot on this topic, see ...


18

See the Nine boxes technique to elaborate your user stories. It's not really a template per se, but it leads to filling the "as a user, I want ... so that ..." template, which is very efficient. Mike Cohn is explaining this better than I would. It also allows to discover non-functional requirements (the ilities). EDIT: the original link to the ...


17

Pair programming is like figure skating you don't need to be together 24x7, only when you're on the ice! (i.e. there are many parts of a project which benefit from being coded separately, the pair re-grouping eventually to review/debug but not actively "competing" for its completion). it all depends on your partner: it can work extremely well or not at ...


15

A "User Story" in extreme programming is supposed to be the smallest possible unit of business value. Some handy suggestions for rules: User stories should only ever be written directly by the business. We want them engaged and to feel a real sense of ownership. All stories are supposed to have some kind of business value attached - even technical stories ...


15

So, as far as my case goes, I have written unit tests, but I find myself going to start writing code first instead of writing a test. I feel there's a thought / design / paradigm change which is actually huge. So, though one really believes in TDD, you actually end up going back old style because of time pressure / project deliverables. ...


13

Second the Buildbot - Trac integration. You can find more information about the integration on the Buildbot website. At my previous job, we wrote and used the plugin they mention (tracbb). What the plugin does is rewriting all of the Buildbot urls so you can use Buildbot from within Trac. (http://example.com/tracbb). The really nice thing about Buildbot ...


13

There is actually a unit testing framework for shellscripts. I haven't used it myself, but it might be worth checking out. Similar questions have been asked before: Unit Testing for Shell Scripts Test Anything Protocol in Shell Scripts


12

We use both Buildbot and Hudson for Jython development. Both are useful, but have different strengths and weaknesses. Buildbot's configuration is pure Python and quite simple once you get the hang of it (look at the epydoc-generated API docs for the most current info). Buildbot makes it easier to define non-testing tasks and distribute the testers. ...


12

What if your team is larger than 2 persons? Just because two people know a part of a system does not mean it shouldn't be documented. And I would be glad to know that I don't have to remember every tiny detail of a system just because it it's stored nowhere else than in my head. For a small system this might work, but as the system gets larger, your ...


12

Here are a few resources that I've collected over time and that might help: Patterns for Splitting User Stories Story Weight Reduction Toolkit Twenty Ways to Split Stories Ways to split user stories Too big or too complicated, there is always a way to put a story on diet (maybe you won't obtain the final result in one iteration but this doesn't mean you ...


11

I'm not sure that having more people who don't know what they're doing in TDD is going to help. It'll quickly descend into both of you Googling the subject, or both of you arguing over exactly what TDD is/isn't. I think you'd be better of getting someone on the team to become the evangelist for a given technique (someone goes and reads up on TDD, someone ...


11

Basically, I try to keep the size of my User Stories in the area of 1 to 10 man-days to complete. That keeps me from passing what Mike Cohn calls "Epics" or "Themes" as user stories to the developers, and on the other size stopping my user-stories to be so specific as to imply the solution (they should be describing the problem, not how it should be solved). ...


10

TDD has subsumed YAGNI in a way. If you do TDD properly, that is, only write those tests that result in required functionality, then develop the simplest code to pass the test, then you are following the YAGNI principle by default. In my experience, it is only when I get outside the TDD box and start writing code before tests, tests for things that I don't ...


10

In my opinion, cost savings is only a part of the equation. Return on investment is a better measure since it takes into account both costs and returns, with the time value of money. Being conscious about your costs is important, but it is even more important to develop software that brings in value. There's only a certain limit you can cut your costs down ...


10

Very Important. If you need to change the commitment, the entire team needs to have another planning meeting and just scrap the current iteration. The new meeting will rescope all the work according to the (new) priorities of the business party. Thats the 'official' way to do it. The entire point of having the commitment meeting is to make a ...


9

I don't think there's a general answer for it, the question is too broad, and you can't just "adopt a methodology" as if it were a product that you take out of the box, it's something that you evolve over time...but in any case I highly recommend you getting a copy of this book: Head First Software Development Then you adapt the ideas you like into your ...


9

How about three years? We have a team that has been doing agile (SCURM and XP) practices for the last three years. It has not missed a date, hit budget within 1 or 2 percent, often has zero defects found in user acceptance testing with only 2 or 3 low or medium defects on production with a user base over 20,000. This is in an environment that is primarily ...


8

To me your question can be taken two ways. One is how do I create the solution to a programming problem and the other is how do I solve a problem that exists (ie debugging). Programming: Don't think about implementation, yet. Make sure you have all the information that you need. Start breaking the problem down into pieces. I use an outliner for this. ...


8

I hope you have a bunch of steps ahead of this one. For this to work you need an excellent resume and phone screen. You don't want to spend oodles of time on candidates that you shouldn't be talking to in the first place. So you suggest an initial interview and possibly have the second interview as the pair programming session? – Ted Smith (1 min ...


8

I got the following answer from a discussion group: it's possible to import (include, whatever) a procedure (function, whatever it's named) from an external file. That's the key to writing a testing script: you break up your script into independent procedures that can then be imported into both your running script and your testing script, ...


8

Usually in the 'vanilla' SCRUM the technical tasks you mentioned will not go as separate stories. To me the non-technical PO should not be looking at the stories like 'Upgrade the server'. It's not a business story, it is not visible to the end-user so it is difficult to prioritize if it is formulated this way. Priorities should be assigned according to the ...


8

So basically, your question is "What can I do if people claim a task is too big for a user story, and can't be split up. In my experience, almost any problem can be split up. Ask them if they can implement a simplified version, leave out advanced features, maybe even use default values in some places; basically anything to produce something that gives ...


7

Just because your tests pass it doesn't mean that the code is correct. Aside from that, I'd say that it's important to consider testing in your design. If your code is difficult to test without intimate knowledge of the internal implementation of the unit under test, you may want to reconsider the design. Otherwise, refactoring becomes more risk prone ...


7

One aspect of extreme programming that can help is pair programming. If you pair weak programmers with strong programmers, then the weak programmers should be able to get much more experience much quicker, and learn the proper way of doing things at a much faster pace. An inexperience programmer left on their own to program can be a very bad thing. An ...


7

Well, to start out with, agile doesn't REALLY help you deliver projects in time so much as let you give accurate estimations of when you will deliver projects--that can be a pretty big difference. It involves accepting the fact that if someone says "The deadline is tomorrow"--it will still be ready when it's ready. Agile helps you be good at tracking when ...


6

We started with Scrum because its formal structure (estimation, user story planning, task planning, daily meetings, retrospective) helped us get from our old methods to be more agile. We've now found that the 3 planning and esitmation meetings can be done on a task/user story basis in the morning meetings. We have a large pin board and pin on index cards ...


6

Agile processes are often paper-based, but this makes some basic assumptions that might not be true in a corporate environment. Even if your team is distributed you can still use pens and paper (with a color scanner) or a white board (with a cheap digital camera). Capturing the images this way can be more agile than trying to use more specialized software ...



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