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6

The issue here is that two elements in the same list, Text "menu1" and UL [...], have types IPagelet and Element respectively. Element is a subtype of IPagelet, so this should work, but unfortunately the F# type inference has some difficulties with this situation. So you need to help it by casting UL [...] to IPagelet: let el = UL [ LI [ ...


5

Trying to make downstream static member constraints explicit can be an exercise in frustration, and, fortunately, it's seldom necessary. Just mark the function inline and let them be inferred. let inline compute (wrapper : Wrapper<_>) = wrapper.Data |> Seq.mapi (fun i value -> (i, value)) |> Seq.sumBy (fun (i, value) -> ...


4

The error here is unrelated to the loop itself. You are using main as a value, but it should be a function from array of strings into int. [<EntryPoint>] let main args = // Your stuff here 0 where args will be inferred as string[]. If you are feeling verbose, you can spell it out: [<EntryPoint>] let main (args : string[]) = // ...


4

In this case the easiest way to do it is to move the mutable variable into a functions argument and use recursion (the while just becomes the halting check for the recursion): let cost = 1.10m let amountGiven = 2.00m let rec giveChange change = if change > 0 then if change >= 0.25m then Console.WriteLine "quater" ...


4

What about annotating xform explicitly? [<GeneralizableValue>] let xform<'t> : Reducer<'t, _, _> = map (fun i -> i + 9) >> map (fun a -> a * 5) >> map (fun s -> s + 1)


4

As already discussed in the question, try-finally expressions with a computation expression for the finally clause are simply not supported (in F# 3.1). However, it is easy to implement a function that has essentially such behavior. Here is an example implementation: let tryFinally (body: Async<'x>) (finalize: Async<unit>) : Async<'x> = ...


3

Writing code using explicit continuation passing style gets ugly quite quickly. In this case, you'd need to write continuation-based version of the List.map function: let map f list cont = let rec loop acc list cont = match list with | [] -> cont (List.rev acc) // Reverse the list at the end & call continuation! | x::xs -> f x ...


3

I would stick more with the original without copying the array (and use Option instead of the magic number -1 for failures): let chop i (nums : int[]) = let rec find a b = if b < a then None else let mid = (a+b)/2 let midValue = nums.[mid] if midValue = i then Some mid elif i < midValue then ...


3

In your code grib is an int. fun () -> ... is not an int, it's a function. Therefore fun () -> ... is not a valid value for the field grib. If grib had the type () -> int, then your code would work (except that you'd have to change grib = 1 on the previous line to grib = fun () -> 1 of course), but that doesn't really seem a useful thing to do ...


3

Apparently if you specify the range with the SheetName!CellRange syntax, you will be able to do what you want. This example is adapted from the example at http://fsprojects.github.io/ExcelProvider: ExcelFile< "MultipleRegions.xlsx", "Sheet2!A1:C5,Sheet2!E3:G5", true>


2

There is nothing wrong with your code unless you're binding the event to a textarea, input:password or input:text. In that case you need to listen to the "select" event instead of "selectstart" like in the example below (notice the event object's explicit downcast to Dom.Event in order to access its information): [<InlineAttribute ...


2

You might like this. There may be a more elegant syntax for this approach, and I expect in the end it is not going to perform much differently, if at all, but here it is: query { for child in d.People do where (child.ParentID.IsSome) join parent in d.People on (child.ParentID.Value = parent.ID) exists (child.Birthdate <= ...


2

A slight variation, that doesn't require an "impossible" case: let binarySearch value (array: 'T[]) = let rec loop lo hi = if lo <= hi then let mid = lo + ((hi - lo) >>> 1) match array.[mid] with | x when x = value -> Some mid | x when x < value -> loop (mid + 1) hi ...


2

I think you just forgot the n (and the tail of a list) here: let rec findYear n = function | [] -> failwith("No person with that year is registrered") | (name,_,(_,n',_)) when n = n' -> name // forgot tail | (name,_,(_,n',_))::tail when n <> n' -> findYear(tail) // forgot n here (should have gotten an error try this: let rec ...


2

Why would annotating map with [<GeneralizableValue>] affect whether xform is subject to the value restriction? (in any case, map is already generalizable since it's defined by a lambda; also I don't see the point of all the inlines). If your requirements are: xform must be generic, but not an explicitly annotated type function xform is defined by ...


2

The API around quotations and reflected method definitions has been changing quite a bit (and I wrote some of the blog posts in the very early days), so this is the most out-of-date part of my blog. Sorry about that! Anyway, the following simple snippet demonstrates the current API: [<ReflectedDefinition>] let foo a b = a + b open ...


1

If you want to use recursion, you can add additional parameter (accumulator), to collect results: let rec findYear n acc = function | [] -> acc | ((name,_,(_,n',_)) as h)::tail when n = n' -> findYear n (h::acc) tail | h::tail -> findYear n acc tail And call it this way: findYear 1973 [] reg Or you could use the 'filter' function ...


1

Looks like a Cecil bug that was recently fixed: "Non-negative number required" trying to read f# dll


1

It turns out that Evaluation.Project and Execution.ProjectInstance are rather different. I tried to use the former, but the latter is closest to the obsolete BuildEngine.Project class I was previously using. The following code snippet returns the fully resolved references for a given project file: #r @"C:\Program Files ...


1

Since your interface defines a non-standard event type you'll have to use DelegateEvent<_> instead of (the more common) Event<_,_>. type DoSomething() = let result = DelegateEvent<_>() interface IDoSomething with member x.Process(input: Foo) = () [<CLIEvent>] member x.Result = result.Publish


1

As suggested above, and in the error message itself, can you add arguments explicitly? let xform x = x |> map ... F# only plays along so well with point free approaches


1

I would consider unzipping the .docx file and extracting the information from the embedded .xml file. You can find out more about the Word 2010 format here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/chrisrae/archive/2010/10/06/where-is-the-documentation-for-office-s-docx-xlsx-pptx-formats-part-2-office-2010.aspx


1

I think the problem is that some arbitrary Output parameter of the Task you end up running is not what the MSBuild task itself returns. It gathers up the "target Returns" of the Tasks you specify directly. However, I don't know exactly how your syntax works here: you are giving Task names rather than Targets? But based on what I've read (entry 37 in ...


1

For me, the difficulty is with using pattern matching. Here is how I would do it without, allowing you to take any number of days, not just two. open System let next count days day = seq { while true do yield! days } // make the days array infinite |> Seq.skipWhile (fun (d, _) -> d <> day) // skip until we find our day |> ...


1

Another F# - C# interop pain :P The F# optional parameter is a valid optional parameter for F# callers, however in C# this parameters will be FsharpOption<T> objects. In your case you must use a Nullable<T>. So, the code looks like: open System.Web.Mvc open System [<HandleError>] type HomeController() = inherit Controller() ...


1

There seems to be some incompatibility between jQuery 1.11 and jQuery UI 1.10, which are the versions linked by WebSharper. I just updated WebSharper.JQueryUI to reference jQuery UI 1.11, so updating the NuGet package to the latest (2.5.7.186) will make this work.



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