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10

F# records cannot be inherited - as Matthew mentions, they are compiled to sealed classes, but it is also an aspect of the F# types system which simply does not allow this. In practice, you could go with an ordinary class declaration. This means that you won't be able to use the { person with ... } syntax and you won't get the automatic structural equality, ...


9

The error message is telling you that (seq->'a) does not implement IComparable which is true since (seq->'a) is a function, not a sequence. If you look at the signature of Seq.max it takes only the sequence as parameter. Remove the lambda (fun version -> version) and it should be alright. Otherwise, if you want to apply a key generator function for the ...


8

If I understand your question correctly, you are asking why I cannot write: raise System.Exception("oops") .. but instead, I have to put parentheses around the expression that creates the exception: raise (System.Exception("oops")) The explanation is that the compiler actually interprets the former as call to raise with two separate arguments - the ...


8

Here, the input type can describe two different things: a tuple or the argument list of a CLI method. This makes no difference on the return type, since the only interpretation of this return type is a tuple. But on the argument list, you can decide between a CLI method that takes two arguments, or a CLI method that takes one argument, which happens to be a ...


8

You have an extra comma in your sprintf call, try this: let getDoubled x = sprintf "%d doubled is %d" x (x * 2) The comma means you are constructing a tuple, and this is what you have in your second snippet - a tuple of a function (your partially applied sprintf that's waiting for the second argument) and an int (the result of x*2).


8

Constraints are not part of method signature (per ECMA 335, I.8.6.1.5 Method signatures) meaning that in CIL you cannot have two methods which signatures differ only in constraints. In order to encode such signatures in CIL one need to use optional or required modifiers but this is not very trivial and today F# does not do that.


7

Since it's not really "natural" to work with statements in functional programming, we explicitly wrap the statements in a do block to show that they are side-effects. I agree with you. However, if you look into F# code in the wild, they tend to be loose in that matter. There is no strict convention, just follow what you think is the best suitable for ...


7

Your first x.Func is defining a property, not a method and because properties cannot be generic it has to use a concrete type for 'a. When you define x.Func y you are creating a method and that can be generic.


7

let a = fun x -> x |> f |> g is equivalent to let a x = x |> f |> g It looks like you want to compose two functions f and g to create a new function a. You can use the >> operator to compose functions. You could write: let a = f >> g If f and g are generic functions then it will fail to compile due to F# value restrictions. ...


7

I think this is a bug in the formatting module that takes care of pretty printing to F# Interactive. There are some non-tail recursive functions that uses PrintLength e.g. boundedUnfoldL in this line. Implementation of boundedUnfoldL is indeed not tail-recursive: let boundedUnfoldL (itemL : 'a -> layout) (project : ...


7

The access specifier of the primary constructor follows the name and type parameters of the type: type ValidString private (value: string) = ...


7

The sequences are lazily evaluated and are not cached. What happens here is that you have a sequence with a side effect that's evaluated multiple times. First evaluation yields first sequence of random numbers: numbers |> Seq.iter( fun n -> printf "%i " n ) The second call runs the evaluation again, producing completely different sequence: let ...


6

The canonical way is to use ( ** ) which avoids comment parsing. The ( **) variation could cause problems when nested inside a (* ... *) comment block


6

Probably the most straightforward way using what F# gives you out of the box: let diffs = Seq.pairwise >> Seq.map (fun (a,b) -> b - a) >> List.ofSeq In general, calls to List.head, tail or append, particularly if they appear in a recursive function, are mild code smells in my book. They usually mean that the function can be written ...


6

The ignore operator is actually a function that takes a single input and returns the unit type (F#'s equivalent of void). So when you have -> ignore you're returning the ignore function. Instead, use () to represent the value of the unit type: | Some(c) -> WriteSomething c |> ignore | None -> () But actually, since ...


6

Yes, for those operators int is the default type inferred unless you specify a different one or is inferred by the use. If you want to define them for all types you have to make the function inline: let inline f x y = x + y But notice that the signature is: x: ^a -> y: ^b -> ^c when ( ^a or ^b) : (static member ( + ) : ^a * ^b -> ^c) ...


6

Automatic generalization doesn't apply to value bindings in the way it applies to function bindings. This means that it can cause problems if the binding isn't syntactically a function, i.e. doesn't have arguments. Try this: let groupOp a = requestToGroup services a (In cases with static resolution, inline can be required additionally, but this doesn't ...


6

Unfortunately, I don't think there is a complete list of things that you get from referencing F# 4.0. However, looking at the list of new things on CodePlex, there are a few obvious ones: Lots of new functions in List, Seq and Array modules (so that equivalent functionality is available in all of the modules where possible) A number of other library ...


6

The use keyword ensures that the Dispose method is called at the end of the lexical scope. This means that it calls it when a value is returned from your make function. The problem is that in your case, the returned value is a function that is called later. In other words, what you're writing could be also seen as: let make f = printfn "1" use file = ...


6

Keyword function implies that the last (implicit) parameter of the function calculate should be tuple containing 3 elements because you are matching on _, _, _ You could rewrite it as: let rec calculate s l acc = match s, l, acc with | _, _, _ when length s = 0 -> acc | _, _, _ when first s = l -> calculate (rest s) l (acc+1) | _, _, ...


5

When you are using a Discriminated Union (DU) (that's the appropriate name for that type), you need to unpack the value in the match statement like this: type MyType = | Bool of bool | Int of int | Str of string with override this.ToString() = match this with | Bool(b) -> if b then "I'm True" else "I'm False" ...


5

You need to use the built in array initialization code as your current array initialization takes ages in the example. Thus replace the line let bits = [| for i in 1 .. ((n+1)*(n+1)) -> 0 |] with line let bits = Array.init ((n+1)*(n+1)) (fun _ -> 0) and you should get performance comparable to the Java code. Update: As John Palmer suggested, ...


5

You could define a helper property that extracts the contents of the DU as obj: member this.Value = match this with | Bool(b) -> box b | Str(s) -> box s | Float(f) -> box f Then you can implement GetHashCode just by getting the value (which involves some boxing, so it will be a bit slower) and calling the GetHashCode on the returned ...


5

[<EntryPoint>] printfn "Enter 10 Names";; let list = [for i in 1 .. 10 -> System.Console.ReadLine(); ] printfn "%A" list // List.sort takes 'list' as a parameter and returns sorted list //(in the case of string list - alphabetically) let sortedlist = List.sort list printfn "%A" sortedlist // List.rev takes ...


5

Use LanguagePrimitives.GenericZero / GenericOne and let type inference do the rest // attempt 1: let inline stepFct1 x = let zero = LanguagePrimitives.GenericZero if x > zero then x else zero I had a look at the link you sent with the function you want to implement. FSharpPlus (F#+) may help you to write generic math code since it contains ...


5

If you're looking for an approach that can be easily extended, I find that using the F# type system can really help when interpreting command line arguments. Ultimately, you want to end up with the details of what was provided in the argList. So first, define the type(s) that you want. You're then parsing the list of strings into those type(s). In your ...


5

Yes, it's possible. Here is a relevant article by FParsec author. If you want to go deeper on the subject, this paper might worth a read. The paper points out that there are multiple packages for indentation-aware parsing that based on Parsec, the parser combinator that inspires FParsec. FParsec doesn't have a separate lexing phase but instead it fuses ...


5

Unfortunately there's no way to do this, the type provider requires a compile time literal string. This is so that when you're compiling the application, the type provider's able to connect and retrieve the metadata about the database and generate the types for the compiler. You can choose to extract out the connection string into a string literal by writing ...


5

One and the rest are not types, but union cases. The Scala equivalent in fact does make them types: sealed trait MyFiveNumbers case object One extends MyFiveNumbers case object Two extends MyFiveNumbers ... In such a simple case you might be best off just using a Java enum. However, if any constructors have parameters (e.g. add | Other of int to the ...


5

The tuple type of F# (a syntactic tuple) is compiled as System.Tuple<..>. So they are the same type at .NET level but for F# type system they are different types: the type of a syntactic tuple will not match the type of a System.Tuple<..> but their runtime type will be the same. You can find a detailed description in the F# spec The example with new ...



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