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11

There is no Seq.tail function in the core F# library (UPDATE: Yes there is, see comments), so I assume you're using the Seq.tail function from FSharpx.Collections. If you're using a different implementation of Seq.tail, it's probably similar -- and it's almost certainly the cause of your problems, because it's not O(1) like you think it is. Getting the tail ...


11

From The F# Language Specification : Range expressions involving expr1 .. expr2 are translated to uses of the (..) operator, and those involving expr1 .. expr1 .. expr3 are translated to uses of the (.. ..) operator. The (.. ..) operator generates an IEnumerable<_> for the range of values between the start (expr1) and finish (expr3) values, ...


10

Seems to be compiler bug (maybe related to 1020). Could reproduce it with your code and F# version 14.0.23413.0 Now installed current preview which is F# version 14.0.23618.0 and it works.


9

Until you have the fix for this issue (see DAXaholic's answer for final fix), you can use this workaround, as explained by dsyme here: https://github.com/Microsoft/visualfsharp/issues/759#issuecomment-162243299 The fix applied to the last sample in the question. First add this. // do something that doesn't get optimized away let workaround() = null |> ...


9

In your operator definition, exp is not necessarily a function. The way you defined the operator, exp is any value whatsoever. For example, you could do this: [0..1] ->>> 42 This would compile and even run, because there is nothing in the definition of your operator that requires the exp parameter to be a function. Or anything else for that ...


8

Use the 'and' keyword let rec runx () = printf "runx" runy () and runy () = printf "runy" runx () runx () |> ignore prints runxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxrunyrunxruny


8

Writing performant F# is very possible but requires some knowledge of patterns that have high relative CPU cost in a tight loop. I recommend using tools like ILSpy to find hidden overhead. For instance one could imagine F# exands this expression into an effective for loop: [3..2..(int (sqrt (float n)))] |> List.tryFind (fun i -> n%i=0) |> ...


8

The PageExt type is likely something that you've pulled into your current FSI session previously which bound something to None, essentially blocking FSI from recognizing the normal option types. In F#, you can reuse names, which "shadows" the original value. For example, in FSI, if you type: let a = 1;; let a = 2.3;; a;; You'll notice that it shows: ...


7

You can do it pretty concisely using Seq.unfold... let collatzSeq = Seq.unfold <| function | 1 -> Some(1, -1) | -1 -> None | n when n % 2 = 0 -> Some(n, n / 2) | n -> Some(n, 3 * n + 1)


7

Try this: let onSearch args = let search = this.FindViewById<EditText>(Resource_Id.search) let searchResults = this.FindViewById<TextView>(Resource_Id.searchResults) button.Text <- search.Text async { let! results = recipeSearch.GetRecipes search.Text this.RunOnUiThread(fun () -> ...


7

When running a slightly modified program (posted below) these are the numbers I received: x64 Release .NET 4.6.1 TestRun: Total: 1000000000, Outer: 100, Inner: 10000000 add_k_array, elapsed 1296 ms, accumulated result 495000099L add_k_list, elapsed 2675 ms, accumulated result 495000099L add_k_list_mutable, elapsed 2678 ms, accumulated result 495000099L ...


7

In general, I think it is not a good idea to try to emulate Haskell patterns in F#. In Haskell, lot of code is written as very generic, because monads and applicatives are used more frequently. In F#, I prefer writing more specialized code, because you do not need to write code polymorphic over monads or applicatives and it just makes it easier to see what ...


7

Your interpretation is correct. By leaving out the actions for the first This and second That you are creating an OR pattern as described in Pattern Matching (F#) To me this is slightly confusing, too, since the logical 'or' is || in F#. And while it is easy to see the first bar as new alternative and second bar as or in your formatting it becomes less ...


7

In F#, a member value is equivalent to a C# property with a getter. i.e. type MyClass() = member this.Member1 = MyCSharpNameSpace.MyClass("param") is equivalent to the C# code: class MyClass { public MyCSharpNameSpace.MyClass Member1 { get { return new MyCSharpNameSpace.MyClass("param"); } } } Hopefully you can now see that ...


7

In most cases, using List.rev is a perfectly sufficient solution. You are right that the F# core library uses mutation and other dirty hacks to squeeze some more performance out of the F# list operations, but I think the micro-optimizations done there are not particularly good example. F# list functions are used almost everywhere so it might be a good ...


7

dict is documented to return a read-only IDictionary<_,_> – you then call .Add on it, and the backing class rightly throws an exception. Create a real Dictionary instance instead and you'll see it works as expected: open System.Collections.Generic type IDictionary<'TKey, 'TValue> with member this.GetOrAdd (key:'TKey, fun':'TKey -> '...


6

I think match selection.GetSelected() : bool*_ with ... should work.


6

Your second example doesn't work because F# doesn't automatically infer static member constraints with methods as it does with operators. So yes, it's possible but you will have to write the constraints by hand, the compiler will not infer them for you: type Mult = Mult with static member inline Do (Mult, v1: 'a list) = fun (v2: 'b list) -> ...


6

You can use a sequence expression: let rec collatzSeq n = seq { match n with | 1 -> yield 1 | n when n % 2 = 0 -> yield n yield! collatzSeq (n / 2) | n -> yield n yield! collatzSeq (3 * n + 1) }


6

The gain in type safety (and discovery) seems to be marginal: one runtime type cast less per resource. There are other advantages here, even in the code you displayed. Using FsXaml is far more concise in your example, and fully type safe. It will also fail at compile time if there are major issues in your XAML files, where using XAML Loader defers this ...


6

Allocating a large amount of lists up front is heavy work, the algorithm can be processed online e.g. via sequences or recursion. I transformed all the work into tail recursive functions for some raw speed (will be transformed into loops by the compiler) not guaranteed to be 100% correct, but hopefully gives you a gist of where I was going with it: let ...


6

The abstract class definition does not recognize the interface definition The interface must be declared above the abstract class, either: in a referenced project/assembly, in a file above your current file (order of files matters), or above in the same file. I'm not sure how to define the abstract members for the interface in the abstract class ...


6

As stated in the comments, you can use Array.concat : files |> Array.map readFile |> Array.map dataLines |> Array.concat Now some refactoring, the composition of two maps is equivalent to the map of the composition of both functions. files |> Array.map (readFile >> dataLines) |> Array.concat Finally map >> concat is equivalent to ...


6

Writing a "combined" builder would be how you would do it in F# if you were to do it. This isn't a typical approach however, and certainly not a practical one. In Haskell you need monad transformers because of how ubiquitous monads are in Haskell. This is not the case with F# - here computation workflows are a useful tool, but only a supplementary one. ...


6

First, let's construct a function that will produce a sequence of n-character combinations. For n=1 (base case), it will produce just a sequence of single characters. For n=2 it will produce all combinations of 2 characters. And so on. For a given n, how do we produce all combinations of n characters? First we prepend "a" to all combinations of n-1 ...


6

The below is the answer from Don Syme (github.com/fsharp): This is by design. The rule called "14.4.3 Implicit Insertion of Flexibility for Uses of Functions and Members" is only applied to uses of functions and members, not uses of record fields.


6

The value inside the angle brackes <"my_data.txt"...> specifies an example format file and is checked at compile time, hence the need for it to be a constant string. Assuming your .fsx script merely wants to load a different CSV file of the same general format, you would use let contents = Data.Load(originalPath)


6

Extension methods are not taken into account in static member constraints (possible duplicate of this) and this is a general problem when you want to implement generic code using member constraints and make it work also with already defined or primitive types. See the user voice request, also the workarounds mentioned here and Don Syme's explanation of why ...


5

The above answer is probably the easiest way of doing this but, purely for the sake of interest, there is a non-recursive solution: type CollatzState = |Continue of int |Stop let collatz v = let unfolder = function |Stop -> None |Continue 1 -> Some (1, Stop) |Continue n when n % 2 = 0 -> Some(n, ...


5

I would be inclined to reject the idea that you shouldn't expose functions as arguments in a library exposed to C#, it's becoming pretty common to do so, you need only look at LINQ, TPL, etc. I don't think too many C# developers would be scared off by that. I would, however, suggest that you avoid exposing functions with curried arguments to C# as these ...



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