Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Instead of storing the data in the AST, give each AST node an ID and map the IDs to other information separately from the AST. Here an example in Scala: final class NodeID // default equals and hashCode implementations FTW sealed abstract class Node { def id: NodeID } sealed abstract class Decl extends Node // ... sealed abstract class Expr extends Node ...


4

In fact, you have already answered your own question. Quoting the comment from the source code, // Throw away the unit result is the pending operation after the call, preventing the compiler from using a tail call here. There's a great blog post by Keith Battocchi, "Tail calls in F#" (scroll to section "Limitations / Calling function values returning ...


2

To tail call optimize your code, the compiler must tail call optimize fix. With higher-order function in fix, the compiler is confused. If you want a tail-recursive fix, try to define it differently: let rec iter p f x = if p x then x else iter p f (f x) iter ((=) 100000000) ((+) 1) 0 Interesting fact: Your fix would not stack overflow in Haskell ...


0

You should use a Discriminated Union (the Command type in this example). Then you can pattern match its options. type Entries = { Entries: List<string>} type Command = | ListEntries of Entries | OtherCommand of string let stack() = let system = ActorSystem.Create "MySystem" let feedBrowser = spawn system "feedBrowser" <| fun ...


2

<- is the assignment operator for mutable variables. Your code should be det <- m.[0, 0] det <- m.[0, 0] * m.[1, 1] - m.[1, 0] * m.[0, 1] j2 <- j2 + 1 = is for equality, that's why you are getting the "this expression to have type bool" error. The second part, "but here has unit", means the compiler is expecting an arm of if to return a unit ...


4

Tagging constructors with unit is just a convention for tooltips, it doesn't affect the actual compilation. I guess it's true that it's a bit weird/inconsistent, compared to the details shown below. Your code is fine as-is, the squiggles on let are just because CalculateVersion does not yet contain a complete expression. If you add a return value it works ...


1

The single = is an equality comparison operation. If you want to do assignment, use the <- assignment operator. Apart from that, F# functions aren't the same as Func<T>. Normally, when you use them as method arguments, the conversion happens automatically, but in this case, it seems you'll need to explicitly perform the conversion: open System ...


1

You could always define NameCount thusly: type NameCount = { Name: string; Count: CountHolder option } And then deal with the None.


1

Notice, that in the post you mentioned, they used [<CliMutable>] but the members themselves were not mutable. While looking at your code, I don't see, why you would need mutable (in F#). The mutable keyword allows assignment using <- which is rarely used in F#. The [<CliMutable>] is there, so that the compiled code is mutable, but it remains ...


0

As per Zach's advice above, I created a working (at least time of writing) example project for OSX and Xamarin Studio: https://github.com/mfrawley/Funny I found the install process absolutely unintuitive but now that it's working and seeing the plethora of NuGet packages available, I'm getting pretty excited to see how this thing develops.


3

The problem here is that you have to be careful with the instance names of the member methods: I think this should work out: [<AbstractClass>] type Generator<'a>() = abstract member Generate: unit -> 'a static member Map (f:'a -> 'b) = fun (g : Generator<'a>) -> { new Generator<'b>() with ...


1

Gen<'a> is a type that essentially abstracts a function int -> 'a (the actual type is a bit more complex, but let's ignore for now). This function is pure, i.e. when given the same int, you'll get the same instance of 'a back every time. The idea is that FsCheck generates a bunch of random ints, feeds them to the Gen function, out come random ...


0

As Fyodor pointed out in his answer, you really just want to apply your constructors to consecutive integers. You can use the built-in mapi for that, writing your entire program as: type Foo = | A of int | B of int | C of int let config = [A; A; B; C] let create offset = List.mapi (fun i f -> f (offset + i)) create 78 config // val it : Foo list = [A 78; ...


1

Hi to add to what Nikos already told you, this is how you can get an decimal between 1 and 999: #r "FsCheck.dll" open FsCheck let decimalBetween1and999 : Gen<decimal> = Arb.generate |> Gen.suchThat (fun d -> d >= 1.0m && d <= 999.0m) let sample () = decimalBetween1and999 |> Gen.sample 0 1 |> List.head ...


1

From a consumer's point of view, you can use the Gen.sample combinator which, given a generator (e.g. Gen.choose), gives you back some example values. The signature of Gen.sample is: val sample : size:int -> n:int -> gn:Gen<'a> -> 'a list (* `size` is the size of generated test data `n` is the number of samples to be returned `gn` ...


2

There is no way to control this at the point of opening, but you can make these modules "automatically openable" at their declaration point. To do this, decorate them with [<AutoOpen>]: module A = [<AutoOpen>] module B = let x = 5 module C = let y = 6 open A let z = x // x is now available let u = C.y // y still requires ...


0

type Foo = | A of int | B of int | C of int let ids startvalue = Seq.initInfinite (fun i -> i + startvalue) let config = [A; A; C; B] let create ids i cfg = let ids' = ids i let nextI = i + List.length cfg (Seq.map2 id cfg ids'), nextI let result, nextI = create ids 0 config let result2, nextI2 = create ids nextI config There are several ...


4

It seems that what you want is to take two sequences, one of functions, the other of arguments, and produce new sequence by applying functions to corresponding arguments, where in your particular case arguments are successive integer numbers and functions are union case constructors. Would that be a correct assessment? If so, here's what I would do: let ...


4

I assume the goal is to have easy access to a real integer value, but restrict it to only a set number of cases. @Petr's suggestion would work fine, you would just convert the enum value to int. Another option is to calculate the value in a method on a DU type: type Distance = TwentyFive | Fifty | Hundred member this.ToInt() = match this ...


0

You can use .NET enums: type Distance = TwentyFive=25 | Fifty=50 | Hundred=100 For pattern matching you must use qualified name though: Distance.Fifty


0

If I understand correctly and you want to create a function that delivers a new value each time it gets called, the usual solution consists in using a ref for the counter and keeping it private. In OCaml, the code is: let create_counter initial_value = let counter = ref initial_value in fun () -> let result = !counter in incr counter; ...


0

Blah, collision between MSBuild property names. Maybe you can work around by defining a target in your project that runs directly before the F# compile target, and sets the F# TargetProfile to mscorlib, then also define a target that runs directly after F# compile that swaps the value back to whatever it was before. From a quick test this seems to work ok. ...


3

You can use something like: let fl = try CSV.load("MyFile.txt") with _ -> CSV.load("MyFile.txt.gz") But I believe a better solution would be to check if the file exists first.


2

Unfortunately, F# doesn't fully support ML-style modules (or functors). The existing answers cover ways to use idiomatic F# to handle certain cases where your existing module could be used, but are fairly restricted. A more faithful, but less idiomatic and far more cumbersome, translation might look more like this: type TermRec<'t> = { succ: 't ...


2

Don't you mean IntTuple($2, $3) as opposed to B($2, $3)? I'd try IntTuple{x=$2; y=$3} EDIT: this works: module Ast type B = { x : int; y : int } type A = | Int of int | String of string | IntTuple of B and %{ open Ast %} %start a %token <string> STRING %token <System.Int32> INT %token ATOMTOKEN TUPLETOKEN %type < Ast.A ...


3

A minimal value-type implementation: type [<Struct>] Term private (i : int) = member __.Value = i member __.Next = Term (i + 1) // optional static members static member Zero = Term () static member value (t : Term) = t.Value static member next (t : Term) = t.Next Equality and comparison are supported by default. You need no ...


4

you can translate this directly into a type (should be possible in ML too): type Term = | Init | Succ of Term Of course it might not be the most performant so you probably something like this instead (closer to your version too): module Term = type T = private T of int let init () = T 0 let succ (T i) = T (i+1) ...


0

Here is a slightly modified MailboxProcessor version: module MBPAsync = type Greet = | Greet of string | Hello of AsyncReplyChannel<bool> let run n = let timer = Stopwatch.StartNew () use greeter = MailboxProcessor.Start <| fun inbox -> async { while true do let! msg = inbox.Receive() match ...


2

The reason for the Akka.NET version beeing slow here is how you communicate with the actor: main process Task FutureActorRef !!ThreadPool!! greeter Ask ----------------------> Tell-----------> MailboxRun -----> (greeter mailbox ...


3

You use the new keyword and define a constructor for it. For example: type simple = struct val A : int val B : int new (a: int, b: int) = { A = a; B = b; } end let s = new simple(1, 2)


0

At the moment (Akka.Persistence.FSharp v0.8) there is no way to create an equivalent of the pre started actor execution block. You can read from persistent storage right by defining custom apply method - it automatically receives the most recent snapshots (within SnapshotOffer message) and events from persistent stores.


1

I'm not an F# developer, but I'm a core dev on Akka.NET. A couple of ideas for your scenario: If you're only using a single actor for this work, you can try using a PinnedDispatcher - that way the actor runs on its own dedicated thread all the time. That will save you on unnecessary context switching overhead. You can also set the throughput of the mailbox ...


1

Based on this question, you should be able to work around this by adding below inside the <configuration> node of %programfiles(x86)%\Microsoft SDKs\F#\3.0\Framework\v4.0\fsi.exe.config <startup useLegacyV2RuntimeActivationPolicy="true"> <supportedRuntime version="v4.0"/> </startup>


7

Your lambda creates array of one tuple [|a,b|] You need array of two elements: (fun (a,b) -> [|a; b|]) Elements in collections are divided by ;


3

I suggest you try using Json.NET as it has a nice F# interface and as you'll see in the code, the syntax is more lightweight than data contract serializer. Look at the copy and update record expression to avoid the mutable unless you absolutely need it. And finally as for your actual question: introduce the two fighters are properties on the parent records ...


0

If your intention is to replace printfn with a logger such as NLog, you can use Printf.ksprintf. open NLog open NLog.Config open NLog.Targets let private logger = let config = new LoggingConfiguration() let consoleTarget = new ColoredConsoleTarget() config.AddTarget("console", consoleTarget) consoleTarget.Layout <- ...


3

First of all, what makes F# powerful is, in my opinion, not just the immutability by default, but a whole mix of features like: immutability by default, type inference, lightweight syntax, sum (DUs) and product types (tuples), pattern matching and currying by default. Possibly more. These make F# very functional by default and they make you program in a ...


5

Having the ability to use mutable state is often important for performance reasons, among other things. Consider implementing the API List.take: count : int -> list : 'a list -> 'a list which returns a list consisting of only the first count elements from the input list. If you are bound by immutability, Lists can only be built up back-to-front. ...


5

Current compilers for declarative (stateless) code are not very smart. This results in lots of memory allocations and copy operations, which are rather expensive. Mutating some property of an object allows to re-use the object in its new state, which is much faster. Imagine you make a game with 10000 units moving around at 60 ticks a second. You can do this ...


5

You can just add a parameter to the builder type: type LoggingBuilder(lf: obj -> unit) = let log p = lf p member this.Bind(x, f) = log x f x member this.Return(x) = x let logger = new LoggingBuilder(printfn "expression is %A") You could make the builder generic if you want to make the input type more specific ...


4

You can use Seq.unfold: let makeIdGenerator (startvalue : uint64) = Seq.unfold (fun i -> Some((i, i+1UL))) startvalue


5

The standard functional programming approach to avoiding mutable state in a loop is to pass it in a parameter instead. If you want an infinite sequence you can use a sequence expression with yield for the "first" result and yield! for the recursive call: let genUint64() = let rec genFrom n = seq { yield n yield! genFrom ...


1

I think you can also rewrite hasChangedRecently like that (and let it print the result) let hasChangedRecently fileName = match System.IO.FileInfo(fileName) with | myFile when myFile.LastWriteTime >= System.DateTime.Parse "10-04-2015" -> printfn "%s" myFile.Name | _ -> () if you want to use function you'll have somehow to help the ...


5

I would change the hasRecentlyChanged to be string -> bool function and filter the files with it, then have a separate function to print the files. let hasChangedRecently fileName = let myFile = System.IO.FileInfo(fileName) myFile.LastWriteTime >= System.DateTime.Parse "10-04-2015" let printFile file = printfn "%s" file and in main: ...


7

Would it be possible to declare the cases as a DU? type MyFunctions = | Intish of int -> int | Stringish of string -> string


0

I tried the converter linked in the other answer, and I didn't like the output of other DUs which were not Option. Instead of that, you may want to opt into only changing the behavior on the Option type rather than all DUs. I found this converter that will change only the behavior for option type to render null on the None option, otherwise the value. The ...


3

let WrapFunction metrics afunc = match box afunc with | :? (int -> int) -> WrapFunctionWithPrefix(metrics, afunc, "My function 1") | :? (string -> string) -> WrapFunctionWithPrefix(metrics, afunc, "My function 2") | _ -> failwith "Unknown function def" will work for your pattern match. You normally end up having to box ...


0

I don't have access to the CSV-file you're using, so I haven't tried this out. But you should be able to do something like (filtered?Close * filtered?Volume) |> Series.groupInto (fun k _ -> k.Date) (fun _ group -> Stats.mean group). This will calculate the close*volume for each minute, then group these by the Date-part (i.e. by day) and finally, ...


1

fsharpc ignores #I (by design), the directive is meant to be used only in fsharpi. For your second question, you can use --standalone to compile all the references into the binary.


0

i am not familiar with deedle but i was curious and found this http://bluemountaincapital.github.io/Deedle/tutorial.html based on that i would try: let dateTimeFilter = [ ... ] //todo add the dateTimes that are currently of interest // in the tutorial it was like this [ for d in 2 .. 4 -> DateTime(2013, 1, d) ] let filtered = ...



Top 50 recent answers are included