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29

This is not Java EE related. This is IDE related. The term is at its own not programming related. From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/facet fac·et (fst) n. One of the flat polished surfaces cut on a gemstone or occurring naturally on a crystal. Anatomy A small, smooth, flat surface, as on a bone or tooth. Biology One of the lenslike ...


25

As BalusC said, this is not Java EE related but IDE related. This allows to add "characteristics" to a project in a flexible way. From the IntelliJ IDEA Q&A for Eclipse Users (because you mentioned IDEA): Q: Facets — what they are for? A: To streamline the project configuration. Facets encapsulate the support for a variety of frameworks, ...


20

As the latest ggplot2 uses gtable internally, it is quite easy to modify a figure: test<-data.frame(x=1:20, y=21:40, facet.a=rep(c(1,2),10), facet.b=rep(c(1,2), each=20)) p <- qplot(data=test, x=x, y=y, facets=facet.b~facet.a) # get gtable object z <- ggplot_gtable(ggplot_build(p)) # add label for right strip z <- gtable_add_cols(z, ...


16

Yes, you can facet any indexed field out of the box. However it might not give you the results you expect until you configure faceting fields according to your data types. Faceting is enabled and used through the facet.* parameters, not fq. fq is used when the user selects a facet value. Some good Solr tutorials: ...


14

They are two different lucene features: Grouping was first released with Lucene 3.2, its related jira issue is LUCENE-1421: it allows to group search results by specified field. For example, if you group by the author field, then all documents with the same value in the author field fall into a single group. You will have a kind of tree as output. If you ...


12

Make sure that the variable species is identical in both datasets. If it a factor in one on them, then it must be a factor in the other too library(ggplot2) dummy1 <- expand.grid(X = factor(c("A", "B")), Y = rnorm(10)) dummy1$D <- rnorm(nrow(dummy1)) dummy2 <- data.frame(X = c("A", "B"), Z = c(1, 0)) ggplot(dummy1, aes(x = D, y = Y)) + geom_point() ...


11

If I understand you correctly, space = "free_x" does what you want. library(ggplot2) ggplot(mydf, aes(X, Y)) + geom_point()+ facet_grid (.~ groups, scales = "free_x", space = "free_x") And if you want the same style of labelling on the x axes: ggplot(mydf, aes(X, Y)) + geom_point()+ scale_x_continuous(breaks = seq(0,20,2)) + facet_grid (.~ ...


11

Make your size a factor in your dataframe by: temp$size_f = factor(temp$size, levels=c('50%','100%','150%','200%')) Then change the facet_grid(.~size) to facet_grid(.~size_f) Then plot: The graphs are now in the correct order.


11

Starting from version 1 of ElasticSearch, the new aggregations API allows grouping by multiple fields, using sub-aggregations: { "aggs": { "genders": { "terms": { "field": "gender" }, "aggs": { "ages": { "terms": { "field": "age_range } } } } } } ...


10

Try this: ggplot(data=alldf.m, aes(x=variable, y = value, colour = ID, group = ID)) + geom_line() + facet_wrap(~fn)


9

You need quotes around the values E.g. frecordtype:"Large Record" works frecordtype:Large Record This will search for Large in the frecordtype, which will bring back nothing.. then Record across the default field in solr.


9

you can customize the facet labels by giving labeller function: f<-function(x,y){if(x=="speed"){c(y[-length(y)], "Total")} else y} ggplot(cars, aes(x=dist))+geom_bar()+facet_grid(.~speed, margin=T, labeller=f)


9

You had everything there, just an error in your assignment to m. Either of these should do the trick: m <- ggplot(mydata, aes(x=T_MEAN)) m + geom_histogram(aes(y = ..density..)) + geom_density() + facet_grid(~ POSCAT) or m <- ggplot(mydata, aes(x=T_MEAN)) m <- m + geom_histogram(aes(y = ..density..)) + geom_density() m + facet_grid(~ POSCAT) ...


9

According to Stroustrup, a 0 argument passed to the constructor tells the facet that the locale will handle destruction, and the both constructors of bpt::time_facet default to 0 when it isn't supplied. A non-zero value, though, implies that the programmer must explicitly handle the destruction of the facet.


9

Try using facet_wrap instead: ggplot(datam, aes(factor(x), value)) + geom_bar(stat="identity") + facet_wrap(~variable,nrow = 2,scales = "free")


9

Here's some code with a dummy geom_blank layer, range_act <- range(range(results$act), range(results$pred)) d <- reshape2::melt(results, id.vars = "pred") dummy <- data.frame(pred = range_act, value = range_act, variable = "act", stringsAsFactors=FALSE) ggplot(d, aes(x = pred, y = value)) + facet_wrap(~variable, scales = ...


8

This is called multi-select faceting and it is possible using specific LocalParams to exclude filters when faceting. See "Tagging and excluding Filters" for details.


8

You should define two fields: one with the value in lower case used for searching and another one to hold the original value. You can use a copy field instruction in your schema.xml to maintain the two fields in sync.


8

Yes, Simply add &facet=true&facet.field={fieldname} to your request Url. Here is another tutorial:Faceting


8

Very good question! This part is tricky since you see the same values most of the time, but... when you use the key_field and value_field you can compute the ranges based on a field and the aggregated data (min,max,total_count,total and mean) on another field. For instance you could compute the ranges on a popularity field and see the aggregated data on a ...


7

Since 1.4, solr handles facets with a large number of values pretty well, as it uses a simple facet count by default. (facet.method is 'fc' by default). Prior to 1.4, solr was using a filter based faceted method (enum) which is definitely faster for faceting on attribute with small number of values. This method requires one filter per facet value. About ...


7

fq=categoryId:(3 55 34) should work if your default operator is OR. Else, try fq=categoryId:(3 OR 55 OR 34). This is called Field Grouping in the Lucene query syntax. (Solr supports the full Lucene syntax as documented here.)


7

I just did this and it's actually quite achievable without rerunning the original search query. you just need to use session to store the original facets. Here's my actual working code: from haystack.views import FacetedSearchView class StickyFacetedSearchView (FacetedSearchView): def top_level_facets(self): """ When selecting a facet ...


7

Found it in the project under: /.settings/org.eclipse.wst.common.project.facet.core.xml <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <faceted-project> <fixed facet="wst.jsdt.web" /> <installed facet="java" version="1.5" /> <installed facet="jst.web" version="2.3" /> <installed facet="wst.jsdt.web" version="1.0" /> ...


7

I had the same problem. I was able to resolve by using the Navigator view and editing the .settings/org.eclipse.wst.common.project.facet.core.xml, changing to: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <faceted-project> <installed facet="java" version="1.6"/> </faceted-project> After this change, the error went away and I could ...


6

To answer your first question: you could simply reorder factor levels so that they are no longer alphabetical, like so: spark$Alarm<-factor(spark$Alarm, levels(spark$Alarm)[c(1,4,2,3)]) For the second question, you could write your own labeller function so associate Alarms and Ranks, something like lbl.fn <- function(variable, value) { ...


6

Ok, I figured this out. 'dt' is a user specified tag, which is set using the {!tag=*} statement, and referenced using the {!ex=} statement. So, the example above is fixed if I add the following to my query: &fq={!tag=tagA}fieldA:facetASelection &fq={!tag=tagB}fieldB:facetBSelection &facet=true &facet.field={!ex=tagA}fieldA ...


6

One of the first, and most important, things you're going to learn about ggplot2 is that when you want something to appear on your plot, you will in general create a variable in your data frame that represents the visual information you wish to display. In your case, you need a variable that picks out only those observations from panel a, line 1: b$grp ...


6

Tyler's comment is one solution. But why plot the facet variable as the x variable? Instead, I would use Background as your x. barplot = ggplot(data=df1, aes(x=Background, y=Count, fill=Background)) + geom_bar(position='dodge') + facet_grid(.~Condition)


6

This should simplify things considerably: library('ggthemes') ggplot(mtcars, aes(mpg, hp)) + geom_point() + facet_wrap(~carb, scales='free') + theme_tufte() + theme(axis.line=element_line()) + scale_x_continuous(limits=c(10,35)) + scale_y_continuous(limits=c(0,400))



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