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I believe this does what you want, except that the "blank" lines start with > and are followed with a blank line. I don't think you can avoid this if using write.fasta. # Example data from documentation library("Biostrings") filepath <- system.file("extdata", "someORF.fa", package="Biostrings") dna <- readDNAStringSet(filepath) rna <- ...


3

I see a few problems with your code. First you loop on std::ifstream::good() which doesn't work because it won't allow for End Of File (which happens even after a good read). Then you access line[0] without checking if the line is empty which could cause a seg-fault. Next you output the "previous line" before you have even collected it. Finally you don't ...


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You're storing the new id before printing the old one: id = line.substr(1); std::cout << id << " : " << DNA_sequence << std::endl; Swap the lines around for proper order. You probably also want to check if you have any id already present to skip the first entry.


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Your bed file needs to be tab-delimited for bedtools to use it. Replace your colons, dashes, and spaces with a tab. The BedTools doc page says "bedtools requires that all BED input files (and input received from stdin) are tab-delimited." BedTools.


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Probably you want textbox.Text = textbox.Text.Replace("\n", "").Replace("\r", ""); Since the text uses \n (or \r) as a line separator.


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It should be noted (for anyone stumbling upon this, like I just did) that there is a robust python library specifically designed to handle these tasks called Biopython. In a few lines of code, you can quickly access answers for all of the above questions. Here are some very basic examples, mostly adapted from the link. There are boiler-plate GC% graphs ...


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There are two problems here. One is that your loop syntax is wrong; the other is that you are using single quotes around the sed script, which prevents the shell from interpolating your variable. The grep can be avoided, anyway; the shell has good built-in facilities for extracting the base name of a file. for i in /folder/*.txt do ...


1

You should be showing an effort in your question as you clearly haven't tried. I'm only answering because it's 3 lines. for line in f: if('Homo sapiens' in line): print line+'\n' EDIT If there is a new line after the header information, then you will require a more clunky piece of code, but it'll get through the file quickly still. f = ...


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If you're only interested in the primary amino acid sequence (wanting to ignore the header), try the following: link = str(sys.argv[1]) #fasta file URL provided as command line argument FASTA = urllib.urlopen(link).readlines()[1:] # as list without header (">...") FASTA = "".join(FASTA).replace("\n","") # as a string free of new line markers print FASTA ...


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An awk script: BEGIN { OFS="\n"; ORS=RS=">"; } { name = $1; $1 = ""; suffix = names[name] ? "-" names[name] : ""; print name suffix $0, "\n"; names[name]++; } The above uses the ">" as a record separator, and checks the first field (which is the header name that can be duplicated). For each line it prints, it adds a suffix ...



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