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40

The reason removing your delete code makes it work is because you are removing the data in the persistent store without updating the other view that still has managed object instances tied to that data still in memory. Remember, while Core Data deals with objects, each object has to have a row in the database behind it. When you delete that row, Core Data ...


30

If you want to do this in all cases, use the ServiceBehaviorAttribute: [ServiceBehavior(IncludeExceptionDetailInFaults=true)] class MyServiceImplementation : IMyService { /// ... } If you want to do it only in some cases, to be determined at runtime.... //////////////////////////////////// // Must include these at the top of file using ...


26

The problem is that NSManagedObjectID you pass is temporary. You can check it by calling NSManagedObjectID's isTemporaryID method. From docs: Returns a Boolean value that indicates whether the receiver is temporary. Most object IDs return NO. New objects inserted into a managed object context are assigned a temporary ID which is replaced with ...


18

This might be a misunderstanding about what a 'fault' is. As described in Apple's documentation: Faulting is a mechanism Core Data employs to reduce your application’s memory usage. and A fault is a placeholder object that represents a managed object that has not yet been fully realized, or a collection object that represents a relationship: So, ...


14

You haven't actually described a problem. A Core Data fault isn't an error-- it's more like a page fault in a file system. It just means that the data hasn't been read yet. What you're describing is completely normal and expected. If you access any of the attributes of the returned objects, the fault will be automatically filled and you'll see the results. ...


12

Coming from a WSDL Contract Perspective, each operation can can have at most one response. However, you can define multiple fault contracts, which basically tells a client "Expect either a response defined by DataContractX, or a fault response defined by FaultContractY or FaultContractZ." Using FaultExceptions allows you finer control over how your WSDL is ...


12

I also update to Node 4.0 and get a segmentation fault on my node server too. I just delete my node_modules directory and rerun npm install, and it is fine. So I suspect it is because the new version of npm has trouble to load some modules installed by old npm --- but just for some modules, it is OK to directly run npm start after updating on my other ...


11

You need to do while (current != NULL) instead of current->next != NULL since the last element in the list will cause segfault.


10

Question 1 Yes it will work. When you call [book chapters] the set will get populated automatically. When you filter on those objects they will fault in. However, you should be using a NSFetchedResultsController here with the predicate being something like @"book == %@" instead of grabbing the array. Question 2 The best way to force the ...


9

A "fault" doesn't mean an error, it just means that the object returned is a "ghost" without its attributes read in. It's normal to get faults for the other side of relationship because you don't what a fetch to set off an uncontrolled cascade of object creation via its relationships. When you access an attribute of the fault, it will be faulted in as a ...


9

Not sure what exactly you are asking but you can throw a web fault using: import suds try: client.service.Method(parameter) except suds.WebFault, e: print e


9

I looked at your sample project. Kudos for posting. First, the behavior you are seeing is not a bug... at least not in Core Data. As you know, relationships cause retain cycles, that must be broken manually (documented here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/cocoa/Conceptual/CoreData/Articles/cdMemory.html). Your code is doing this ...


8

There is a codeplex project called TestAPI that can do runtime fault injection. You need to look at its managed code fault injection API. It uses the CLR profiling API to intercept method calls at runtime and modify their behaviour. Have a look at an example to see how to inject an exception on a method call in an already compiled exe.


8

It can depend on where and how you want the exception handled. A client (regardless of platform) will always receive a soap fault exception whether the service code allows for unhandled exceptions, the service explicitly throws a FaultException or throws the generic version of FaultException. Whether you want to define custom fault exceptions to make it ...


6

From Core Data Programming Guide You are discouraged from overriding description—if this method fires a fault during a debugging operation, the results may be unpredictable—and initWithEntity:insertIntoManagedObjectContext:. You should typically not override the key-value coding methods such as valueForKey: and setValue:forKeyPath:. -description is a ...


6

Let them crash and let the Windows Error Reporting handle it - under Vista+, you should also consider registering with Restart Manager, so that you have a chance to save out the user's work and restart the application (like what Word/Excel/etc.. does)


6

You are trying to read into an uninitialized char*. Just declaring char *mystring doesn't give you a string to work with: you'll need to allocate space for the string. Either: char *mystring = malloc(MAX_STRING_LENGTH); Or: char mystring[MAX_STRING_LENGTH]; Once you have a buffer, use fgets instead of gets. fgets allows you to specify an upper-bound ...


6

Enable your compiler warnings: This is not valid: fscanf(devices, "%d", numDevices); Here is want you want: fscanf(devices, "%d", &numDevices); d conversion specifier requires a pointer to a signed integer. You were passing the value of the (unintialized) object numDevices.


6

arr is an uninitialized array of pointers. You're "lucky" it works at all, because you invoked undefined behaviour.


5

Typemock Isolator seems to be your best bet. Here's what you can do, if you want to throw a FileNotFoundException to simulate testing. In your production code, you have such method public static Project OpenProject(string filePath) And in your test code, you can fake the OpenProject call like this ...


5

I think I have now solved this myself. It seems that for some reason the eclipse WSDL-editor did not add the fault to the binding part of the WSDL. So when I added: <wsdl:fault name="fault"> <soap:fault use="literal" name="fault" /> </wsdl:fault> to the binding, it compiles fine. The complete wsdl is now: <?xml version="1.0" ...


5

If you try to determine this yourself then the very act of running your program could invalidate the relevant cache lines, hence rendering your measurements useless. This is one of those cases that mirrors the scientific principle that you cannot measure something without affecting that which you are measuring.


5

In general, I don't think this is possible. It works for DRAM and the pagefile since that is an OS managed resource, cache is managed by the CPU itself. The OS could do a tight timing loop of a memory read and try to see if it completes fast enough to be in the cache or if it had to go out to main memory - this would be very error prone. On ...


5

Faults are part of SOAP protocol and are not available in REST scenarios. I don't believe any of the WCF infrastructure supports what you are doing out of the box. You can set FaultExceptionEnabled=true in your WebHttp behavior configuration to get a FaultException rather than 500 error. However, you can also do something like this (I have done this in ...


5

The sizeof(size_t) is platform dependent. On OSX with the default 32 bit code, size_t is 4 bytes. On 64 bit Linux, size_t is 8 bytes. If you're running on 64 bit Linux, you're reading a different n that you're reading on 32 bit OSX. If you must use a binary data format, don't use the size of platform specific types as the field size. Decide whether the file ...


5

I would use a combination: mv file.dat file.dat.previous cp file.dat.previous file.dat That way file.dat.previous will always be complete as mv is atomic.


5

This error happens when your code (or MagicalRecord) retains an object that is deleted by CoreData in a managed object context, usually on another thread. I would make sure I am not storing temporary objects or objects that may be deleted as properties, in collections, etc. Because you mentioned you don't, I would make sure I don't have threading code that ...


5

I think you can just test if (objectA.relationshipToB != nil) ... This will not fire a fault for the related B object because you don't access its properties.


5

First, you should have written a very small test program before inundating yourself with all sorts of file I/O and other things that are not important. I took your code, and created the following 3 line main program (I am using Visual C++ 2013): int main() { tLista myList; myList.append("abc"); myList.append("123"); // < -- hangs here } ...


5

Your premise is wrong. The casting() method returns a new copy of the _casting vector every time it is called. Thus it2 can never equal it->second.casting().end(), since it's an iterator to a completely different container! In fact, it2 is immediately invalidated at the end of the full expression, since it's an iterator into a temporary container that ...



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