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4

You're not using the same data format on the two sides. Your Haskell code produces a flat array of all the values in all the tuples of the vector, while your C code expects an array of pointers, one for each element of the vector, pointing to the values in that tuple. If you could declare your C function like this (maybe this is valid C nowadays, I don't ...


4

This is just explanation of what's going on, see @Hakala's answer for the solution. The problem is that on Windows file names are case insensitive. When you are executing $ ghc -no-hs-main inc.c Inc -o simplest GHC calls GCC to compile inc.c into object file inc.o. But on Windows it also overwrites Inc.o generated by ghc -c Inc.hs. So, it is actually ...


4

I did the following: renamed inc.c to inc_main.c because having C object file inc.o might overlap with haskell object run ghc -c -no-hs-main Inc.hs -o Inc.o Produce C object file by gcc -O -Wall -I/usr/lib/ghc/include -c inc_main.c Link to an executable with ghc -no-hs-main Inc.o inc_main.o -o simplest


3

extern "C" fn in Rust means the function uses the C calling convention. C# expects P/Invoke functions to use the stdcall calling convention by default. You can tell C# to use the C calling convention: [DllImport("rustffilib.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)] Alternatively, you could use extern "stdcall" fn on the Rust side.


3

extra-libraries should have just the base library name, so use extra-libraries: MyLib.


3

According to the documentation, :string represents a null-terminated string, which is char * in C. The &str argument is not equivalent to that type: a &str is a compound value, composed of a pointer and a length. The safest solution is to change your Rust function to accept a *const c_char instead. You can then use CStr::from_ptr and CStr::to_str to ...


3

I'm not sure of the full extent of the issues, but I know this one isn't going to be good: you can not return a String through FFI. A Rust String is conceptually 3 parts: a pointer to a chunk of memory, how long that memory is, and how much of that memory is a valid string. Compare that to a C string. A C string is just a pointer to memory. You don't know ...


2

Foreign.Marshal.Array seems to provide a way to convert haskell data to C data and other way around. I tested interfacing C code and haskell using the following files (Haskell + FFI for the first time for me) hsc2hs rgb_ffi.hsc ghc main.hs rgb_ffi.hs rgb.c rgb.h #ifndef RGB_H #define RGB_H #include <stdlib.h> typedef struct { float r; ...


1

attach_function :create_client, [:pointer, :string], :pointer The const char * means its a c string the const part after only matters to the function your calling. See this for more details. The function you wrapped looks correct to me but im assuming you need more than this function which will be more complex. The FFI wiki has some good info here.



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