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34

fflush() works on FILE* , it just flushes the internal buffers in the FILE* of your application out to the OS. fsync works on a lower level, it tells the OS to flush its buffers to the physical media. OSs heavily caches data you write to a file. If the OS enforced every write to hit the drive, things would be very slow. fsync(among other things) allows ...


33

Simple: this is undefined behavior, since fflush is meant to be called on an output stream. This is an excerpt from the C standard: int fflush(FILE *ostream); ostream points to an output stream or an update stream in which the most recent operation was not input, the fflush function causes any unwritten data for that stream to be delivered ...


33

I've never heard not to flush the output buffer, and I would be interested to hear your source on that. Flushing the output buffers: printf("Buffered, will be flushed"); fflush(stdout); // Prints to screen or whatever your standard out is or fprintf(fd, "Buffered, will be flushed"); fflush(fd); //Prints to a file Can be a very helpful technique. Why ...


20

I believe fflush is only used with output streams. You might try fpurge or __fpurge on Linux. Note that fpurge is nonstandard and not portable. It may not be available to you. From a Linux fpurge man page: Usually it is a mistake to want to discard input buffers. The most portable solution for flushing stdin would probably be something along the lines ...


18

It's a little hard to say what "can be problems with" (excessive?) use of fflush. All kinds of things can be, or become, problems, depending on your goals and approaches. Probably a better way to look at this is what the intent of fflush is. The first thing to consider is that fflush is defined only on output streams. An output stream collects "things to ...


13

If the library implementation can determine the output stream not to refer to an interactive device (and only then), the stream will be fully buffered, i.e. it will be flushed when the buffer (by default of BUFSIZ size) is full. If not fully buffered, a stream can be line buffered, i.e. it will be flushed when an '\n' is written (or the buffer is full, if ...


11

According to the standard, fflush can only be used with output buffers, and obviously stdin isn't one. However, some compilers provide the use of fflush(stdin) as an extension. In that case you can use it, but it will affect portability, so you will no longer be able to use any standards-compliant compiler on earth and expect the same results.


10

From the comp.lang.c FAQ, see: How can I flush pending input so that a user's typeahead isn't read at the next prompt? Will fflush(stdin) work? If fflush won't work, what can I use to flush input?


7

You must have #include <stdio.h> when you call any function declared in that header. Ok, that's not quite true. In the 1989/1990 version of the language standard, a call can create an implicit declaration of a function. If that happens to match the correct declaration, you can get away with it;. Otherwise your program's behavior is undefined -- which ...


7

Difference is that flushstdin is user defined and the only way in standard C to flush stdin. fflush is a standard library function. fflush(stdin); will invoke undefined behavior. c- faq: 12.26a: fflush is defined only for output streams. Since its definition of "flush" is to complete the writing of buffered characters (not to discard them), ...


6

I don't understand why sometimes I need to use fflush() and sometimes not. Sometimes the stdio buffers are flushed sometimes they aren't. For example simply including a "\n" in the printed stuff will typically flush it (because stdout is by default line-buffered when attached to a terminal). When a program segfaults, does stdout not flush its ...


6

fflush() is used for clearing output buffers. Since you are trying to clear an input buffer, this may lead to undefined behavior. Here is an SO question explaining why this isn't good practice : Using fflush(stdin)


6

Flushing copies data from the stream's internal buffer to the underlying file. So the flushing function needs to know the source and the destination to copy. This depends on I/O implementation, for C++ <iostream> see Jerry Coffin's answer - the buffers in <iostream> are more smart. With C-style <cstdio>, if you want to flush with just ...


5

It is completely legitimate to call fprintf as many times as one needs without a single call to fflush. Crashes are caused by something else in your program, most likely some invalid memory access, and adding fflush calls will not fix them.


5

fflush is meant to work with output or update streams and using it with an input stream is undefined behavior, from cppreference C section for fflush: The behavior is undefined if the given stream is of the input type or if the given stream is of the update type, but the last I/O operation was not an output operation. undefined behavior is behavior ...


4

How to flush the stdin?? Flushing input streams is invoking Undefined Behavior. Don't try it. You can only flush output streams.


4

deleted quote from docs, see Ollie's answer Another possible way to do this is a Java stored procedure, where you can use the more full-featured Java API for creating and writing to files.


4

The behavior of fflush is not defined for input streams; fflush(stdin) is a coding error, and you should remove those calls from your code. When scanning for individual characters, add a blank space before the %c conversion specifier; this will tell scanf to skip any leading whitespace and read the next non-whitespace character: scanf(" %c", ...


4

The fflush function does not flush data out of an input stream; it is instead used to push data buffered in an output stream to the destination. This is documented here. As seen in this earlier SO question, trying to use fflush(stdin) leads to undefined behavior, so it's best to avoid it. If you want to eat the newline from the return character entered ...


4

Some streams buffer output data and do not write to the device immediately. fflush forces the contents of the stream's buffer, if there is one, to be written to the device and the buffer cleared.


4

Replace scanf("%c", &data); with scanf(" %c", &data); to fix the issue. The space character behind %c skips all whitespace characters including none, until the first non-whitespace character as specified in the C11 standard: 7.21.6.2 The fscanf function [...] A directive composed of white-space character(s) is executed by ...


3

fflush(fp2) or fclose(fp2) will move the pending, buffered bytes to disk.


3

The translation to C++ programming style is this: #include <iostream> using std::cin; using std::cout; using std::string; int main() { string line; int a, b; if (cin >> a >> b) { for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { cout << "5" << std::endl; // endl does the flushing if (std::getline(cin, line)) { ...


3

It's safe. Here's what C (C99 atleast, paragraph 7.19.6.1) says about it If the format is exhausted while arguments remain, the excess arguments shall be evaluated but are otherwise ignored. If the goal was to avoid a line, i'd rather do fflush(stdout); fprintf(stdout, "message"); if for nothing else than to prevent the person later reading ...


3

Dustin, The Oracle documentation here: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/appdev.102/b14258/u_file.htm#i1003404 States that: FFLUSH physically writes pending data to the file identified by the file handle. Normally, data being written to a file is buffered. The FFLUSH procedure forces the buffered data to be written to the file. The data must be ...


3

The reason the subsequent fflush() operations succeed is that there is no (new) data to write to disk. The first fflush() failed; that is tragic but history. The subsequent fflush() has nothing to do, so it does so successfully. If you are writing to a database, you have to be careful about each write - not just dealing with problems at the end. ...


3

You should be able to do that with one pointer (and thus not having to sync unnecessarily). Just use fseek(f, SEEK_END, 0); when you want to add at the end. Use "rb+" to make the file readable and writeable. As long as you don't use multiple threads to access the file, this should work just fine.


3

You should check the return value of scanf. It returns the number of items it managed to "scan", which will be zero if it failed to scan anything, for example when you input 'x': if (scanf("%lf", &q) == 1) { printf("Input OK.\n"); a[x] = q; } else { printf("Wrong Input\n"); x--; }


3

The standard output is normally flushed when you write a newline. If you want to test this properly, open a file and write to it. For your tests to be useful, you will have to write a lot more data than just a few integers. You should find that omitting fflush will result in significantly faster code. Try timing these two loops... With flushing: FILE * ...



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