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9

You can use the numpy FFT module for that, but have to do some extra work. First let's look at the Fourier integral and discretize it: Here k,m are integers and N the number of data points for f(t). Using this discretization we get The sum in the last expression is exactly the Discrete Fourier Transformation (DFT) numpy uses (see section "Implementation ...


8

If you don't have access to findpeaks, the basic premise behind how it works is that for each point in your signal, it searches a three element window that is centred at this point and checks to see whether the centre of this window is larger than the left and right element of this window. You want to be able to find both positive and negative peaks, so ...


7

It's Vf = fftshift(fft(ifftshift(V))); That is, you need ifftshift in time-domain so that samples are interpreted as those of a symmetric function, and then fftshift in frequency-domain to again make symmetry apparent. This only works for N odd. For N even, the concept of a symmetric function does not make sense: there is no way to shift the signal so ...


6

You're allocating an array of fftw_complexes, which consist of two elements — the real and complex components — but you're only initializing the real component of each sample. This is probably leaving the complex components containing random data, causing unexpected crazy results! If you don't need to deal with complex samples — which is likely — you may ...


5

The original Cooley-Tukey form of the FFT was limited to powers of 2. A lot of people are still stuck in that mindset. Even professors still perpetuate the myth that FFTs need to be 2^K to be fast. The truth is that modern FFT libraries use a mixed radix approach. It allows fast transforms for a size that is an aggregate of small primes. Usually a number ...


5

For 1D, the i'th derivative in time-domain is related to the frequency domain as follows: Source: Wikipedia Here, i represents the complex number, or the square root of -1, and f is the frequency in the frequency domain. F^{-1} is the inverse Fourier Transform of the signal X(f), which is the Fourier Transform of the time domain signal x(t). ...


5

NFFT can be any positive value, but FFT computations are typically much more efficient when the number of samples can be factored into small primes. Quoting from Matlab documentation: The execution time for fft depends on the length of the transform. It is fastest for powers of two. It is almost as fast for lengths that have only small prime factors. It ...


4

If you want to cut out the frequencies between 5 and 7, then you'll want to keep frequencies where (f < min_freq) | (f > max_freq) which is equivalent to np.logical_or(f < min_freq, f > max_freq) Therefore, use return np.where(np.logical_or(f < min_freq, f > max_freq), sig, 0) instead of return np.where(np.logical_or(f < ...


4

The x-axis in your plot does not have the unit Hertz (Hz). The way you created the plot, it will be the index of the frequency in the frequency vector.. As your input signal appears to be about 200'000 samples long, the FFT is that long too. If you want the axis to be in Hertz, you will have to create a frequency vector that contains the corresponding ...


4

If you are implementing the DFFT entirely within Python, your code will run orders of magnitude slower than either package you mentioned. Not just because those libraries are written in much lower-level languages, but also (FFTW in particular) they are written so heavily optimized, taking advantage of cache locality, vector units, and basically every trick ...


4

Just to remind ourselves of how MATLAB stores frequency content for Y = fft(y,N): Y(1) is the constant offset Y(2:N/2 + 1) is the set of positive frequencies Y(N/2 + 2:end) is the set of negative frequencies... (normally we would plot this left of the vertical axis) In order to make a true low pass filter, we must preserve both the low positive ...


4

As you have noted, the fftw_plan_dft_1d function computes the standard FFT Yk of the complex input sequence Xn defined as where j=sqrt(-1), for all values k=0,...,N-1 (thus generating N complex outputs in the array out), . You may notice that since the input happens to be real, the output exhibits Hermitian symmetry, that is for N=8: out[4] == ...


4

Numpy can typically do things hundreds of time faster than plain python, with very little extra effort. You just have to know the right ways to write your code. Just to name the first things I think of: Indexing Plain python is often very slow at things that a computer should be great at. One example is with indexing, so a line like ...


4

Why NumPy and octave gave different results: The inputs were different. The ' in octave is returning the complex conjugate transpose, not the transpose, .': octave:6> [1+0.5j,3+0j,2+0j,8+3j]' ans = 1.0000 - 0.5000i 3.0000 - 0.0000i 2.0000 - 0.0000i 8.0000 - 3.0000i So to make NumPy's result match octave's: In [115]: ...


4

Each Fourier coefficient computed by the discrete Fourier transform of the array x is a linear combination of the elements of x; see the formula for X_k on the wikipedia page on the discrete Fourier transform, which I'll write as X_k = sum_(n=0)^(n=N-1) [ x_n * exp(-i*2*pi*k*n/N) ] (That is, X is the discrete Fourier transform of x.) If x_n is normally ...


4

I assume 1D DFT/IDFT ... All DFT's use this formula: X(k) is transformed sample value (complex domain) x(n) is input data sample value (real or complex domain) N is number of samples/values in your dataset this whole thing is usually multiplied by normalization constant c as you can see for single value you need N computations so for all samples it is ...


4

For each frequency bin, the magnitude sqrt(re^2 + im^2) tells you the amplitude of the component at the corresponding frequency. The phase atan2(im, re) tells you the relative phase of that component. The real and imaginary parts on their own are not particularly useful.


4

It was an implementation bug in OpenModelica; it has been fixed in r22261. Note: Bug reports should ideally be reported to https://trac.openmodelica.org/OpenModelica/newticket


4

Frequency relationship (x-axis scaling) The frequency of each values produced by the FFT is linearly related to the index of the output value through: f(i) = (i-1)*sampling_frequency/N Where N is the number of FFT points (ie. N=length(y)). In your case, N=2001. One can deduct the sampling frequency from your definition of t as 1/T where T is the ...


4

I think that the above observation/result makes sense given the choice of your sampling rate fs and block size N of 8000 and 256 respectively. Note that fs/N = 8000/256 = 31.25 The discrete outputs from the FFT N-point transform can only be associated with frequencies that are multiples of the above m*fs/N = m*31.25 for m=0,1,2,….,255 There does not ...


4

This is not a low-pass filter at all. A low-pass filter passes low frequencies, i.e. it removes fine details (blurring). You obviously need a 2D FFT for that. This code just removes random bits, essentially. [edit] The new code looks a lot more like a low-pass filter. The 141% setting is expected: the diagonal of a square is sqrt(2)=1.41 times its side. ...


4

You're conflating conversion between time-discrete and time-continuous forms of a signal with reversibility of a transform. The only guarantee is: For a given transform of some discrete signal, its inverse transform will yield the "same" discrete signal back. The discrete signal is abstract from any frequencies. All that the transform does is take some ...


4

A DFT (or FFT) with a length of exactly one period of your custom waveform will produce a harmonic table. Just low-pass filter and sample your waveform 2^N times, and feed that to a generic library FFT. (Choose a large enough 2^N to be at least more than 2X the low-pass filter's or your waveform's intrinsic highest frequency content). The magnitudes of ...


4

Have you considered using the multiprocessing module to parallelize processing the files? Assuming that you're actually CPU-bound here (meaning it's the fourier transform that's eating up most of the running time, not reading/writing the files), that should speed up execution time without actually needing to speed up the loop itself. Edit: For example, ...


4

Consider the FFT of a single period of a sine wave: >>> t = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, 100) >>> x = np.sin(t) >>> f = np.fft.rfft(x) >>> np.round(np.abs(f), 0) array([ 0., 50., 1., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., ...


4

No, the FFT is not a way to calculate the Fourier transform (FT) of an array. The FFT is a fast algorithm to calculate the DFT, discrete Fourier transform. The DFT and the FT are 2 different things, and you can't use the DFT to calculate the FT. See this link on their differences. If your function is periodic, then its spectrum is a function defined only ...


4

"Output is red", this likely means it is x this could be due to multiple drivers or an uninitialized value. If it was un-driven it would be z. The main Issue I believe is that you do this : initial begin IN[0] = X[2*X_WDTH-1:0]; IN[1] = X[4*X_WDTH-1:2*X_WDTH]; ... The important part is the initial This is only evaluated once, at time 0. Generally ...


3

Synthesis tools unroll loops in order to synthesize the circuit. Therefore, only loops that iterate a constant number of times, whose constant is known at compile/elaboration time are synthetisable. When the stop value is not known, you can assume a maximum number of iterations and use that as the stop condition. Then add the original stop condition as a ...


3

Fundamental frequency detection for human voice is an active area of research, as the references below suggest. Your approach must be carefully designed and must depend on the nature of the data. For example if your source is a person singing a single note, with no music or other background sounds in the recording, a modified peak detector might give ...



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