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9

If you don't have access to findpeaks, the basic premise behind how it works is that for each point in your signal, it searches a three element window that is centred at this point and checks to see whether the centre of this window is larger than the left and right element of this window. You want to be able to find both positive and negative peaks, so ...


6

For 1D, the i'th derivative in time-domain is related to the frequency domain as follows: Source: Wikipedia Here, i represents the complex number, or the square root of -1, and f is the frequency in the frequency domain. F^{-1} is the inverse Fourier Transform of the signal X(f), which is the Fourier Transform of the time domain signal x(t). ...


6

I'm only writing this answer because experience has taught me that as soon as I do write this sort of answer one of the real Fortran experts hereabouts piles in to correct me. I don't think that the current standard, nor any of its predecessors, states explicitly that a complex is to be implemented as two neighbouring-in-memory reals. However, I think that ...


5

The original Cooley-Tukey form of the FFT was limited to powers of 2. A lot of people are still stuck in that mindset. Even professors still perpetuate the myth that FFTs need to be 2^K to be fast. The truth is that modern FFT libraries use a mixed radix approach. It allows fast transforms for a size that is an aggregate of small primes. Usually a number ...


5

I assume 1D DFT/IDFT ... All DFT's use this formula: X(k) is transformed sample value (complex domain) x(n) is input data sample value (real or complex domain) N is number of samples/values in your dataset this whole thing is usually multiplied by normalization constant c as you can see for single value you need N computations so for all samples it is ...


5

NFFT can be any positive value, but FFT computations are typically much more efficient when the number of samples can be factored into small primes. Quoting from Matlab documentation: The execution time for fft depends on the length of the transform. It is fastest for powers of two. It is almost as fast for lengths that have only small prime factors. It ...


5

I have adapted this page for the solution. Fs = 100000/50; % Sampling frequency (in 1/ps) T = 1/Fs; % Sample time (in ps) L = 100000; % Length of signal t = (0:L-1)*T; % Time vector; your first column should replace this % Sum of a 50 1/ps sinusoid and a 120 1/ps ...


5

To address these in order: 1) You don't need to normalize, but the input normalization is close to the raw structure of the digitized waveform so the numbers are unintuitive. For example, how loud is a value of 67? It's easier to normalize it to be in the range -1 to 1 to interpret the values. (But if you wanted to implement a filter, for example, where ...


4

For each frequency bin, the magnitude sqrt(re^2 + im^2) tells you the amplitude of the component at the corresponding frequency. The phase atan2(im, re) tells you the relative phase of that component. The real and imaginary parts on their own are not particularly useful.


4

So I run a functionally equivalent form of your code in an IPython notebook: %matplotlib inline import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import scipy.fftpack # Number of samplepoints N = 600 # sample spacing T = 1.0 / 800.0 x = np.linspace(0.0, N*T, N) y = np.sin(50.0 * 2.0*np.pi*x) + 0.5*np.sin(80.0 * 2.0*np.pi*x) yf = scipy.fftpack.fft(y) xf = ...


4

Frequency relationship (x-axis scaling) The frequency of each values produced by the FFT is linearly related to the index of the output value through: f(i) = (i-1)*sampling_frequency/N Where N is the number of FFT points (ie. N=length(y)). In your case, N=2001. One can deduct the sampling frequency from your definition of t as 1/T where T is the ...


4

It was an implementation bug in OpenModelica; it has been fixed in r22261. Note: Bug reports should ideally be reported to https://trac.openmodelica.org/OpenModelica/newticket


4

Why NumPy and octave gave different results: The inputs were different. The ' in octave is returning the complex conjugate transpose, not the transpose, .': octave:6> [1+0.5j,3+0j,2+0j,8+3j]' ans = 1.0000 - 0.5000i 3.0000 - 0.0000i 2.0000 - 0.0000i 8.0000 - 3.0000i So to make NumPy's result match octave's: In [115]: ...


4

Each Fourier coefficient computed by the discrete Fourier transform of the array x is a linear combination of the elements of x; see the formula for X_k on the wikipedia page on the discrete Fourier transform, which I'll write as X_k = sum_(n=0)^(n=N-1) [ x_n * exp(-i*2*pi*k*n/N) ] (That is, X is the discrete Fourier transform of x.) If x_n is normally ...


4

Numpy can typically do things hundreds of time faster than plain python, with very little extra effort. You just have to know the right ways to write your code. Just to name the first things I think of: Indexing Plain python is often very slow at things that a computer should be great at. One example is with indexing, so a line like ...


4

The x-axis in your plot does not have the unit Hertz (Hz). The way you created the plot, it will be the index of the frequency in the frequency vector.. As your input signal appears to be about 200'000 samples long, the FFT is that long too. If you want the axis to be in Hertz, you will have to create a frequency vector that contains the corresponding ...


4

It's not really a programming question, and is not specific to numpy. Briefly, the absolute value of the complex number (sqrt(x.real**2 + x.imag**2), or numpy.abs()) is the amplitude. More detailed, when you apply FFT to an array X (which, say, contains a number of samples of a function X(t) at different values of t), you try to represent it as a sum of ...


4

If you are implementing the DFFT entirely within Python, your code will run orders of magnitude slower than either package you mentioned. Not just because those libraries are written in much lower-level languages, but also (FFTW in particular) they are written so heavily optimized, taking advantage of cache locality, vector units, and basically every trick ...


4

Just to remind ourselves of how MATLAB stores frequency content for Y = fft(y,N): Y(1) is the constant offset Y(2:N/2 + 1) is the set of positive frequencies Y(N/2 + 2:end) is the set of negative frequencies... (normally we would plot this left of the vertical axis) In order to make a true low pass filter, we must preserve both the low positive ...


4

As you have noted, the fftw_plan_dft_1d function computes the standard FFT Yk of the complex input sequence Xn defined as where j=sqrt(-1), for all values k=0,...,N-1 (thus generating N complex outputs in the array out), . You may notice that since the input happens to be real, the output exhibits Hermitian symmetry, that is for N=8: out[4] == ...


4

If you want to cut out the frequencies between 5 and 7, then you'll want to keep frequencies where (f < min_freq) | (f > max_freq) which is equivalent to np.logical_or(f < min_freq, f > max_freq) Therefore, use return np.where(np.logical_or(f < min_freq, f > max_freq), sig, 0) instead of return np.where(np.logical_or(f < ...


4

The name ConstUnsafePointer was used in early Swift betas last summer (at that time, UnsafePointer meant mutable). Now, constant pointers are just UnsafePointer and mutable pointers are UnsafeMutablePointer.


4

There are ways of seperating seperate sounds in audio, but they can be very tricky and require a lot of knowledge about digital signal processing. There is actually an example of what you're talking about demonstrated by Dr. Alan Openheimer in his MIT lecture series on digital signal processing. (around 9:50 in the video) If you're serious about doing ...


4

Parseval's theorem states that the total power in the two domains (space/time and frequency) are equal. Its statement, for DFT is this. Notice, that in spite of the 1/N on the right, this is not mean power, but total power. The reason for the 1/N is the normalization convention for the DFT. Put in Python, this means that for a time/space signal sig, ...


4

The Rosetta only provides butterflies for a radix of two, and can, therefore, only handle FFT lengths of 2^N. For a DFT of length ten, you need an additional "butterfly" for the radix five (mixed radix DFT). You can try perform an FFT of length 16 and to zero-pad the last six entries...


4

To append to Mark's answer this is indeed stated in the Standard: Clause 16.5.3.2 "Storage sequence": 2 In a storage association context [...] (2) a nonpointer scalar object that is double precision real or default complex occupies two contiguous numeric storage units, emphasis mine. As for storage association context: Clause 16.5.3.1 ...


3

Is there any limit of frequency with Web Audio, or is it the limit of my device? I don't think the WebAudio framework itself limits this. Like the other answers have mentioned here. The limit is probably from microphone's and loudspeaker's physical limits. I tried to use the my current bookshelf loudspeaker (Kurzweil KS40A) I have along with a decent ...


3

The reason why this is probably happening is because of the following things: When you take the 2D fft of your image, it will produce a double valued result, even though your image is mostly unsigned 8-bit integer. MATLAB assumes that double formatted images have their intensities / colours between [0,1]. By doing imshow on just the magnitude itself, you ...


3

What you are observing is aliasing. As you can see by comparing the results using a sampling rate of 50kHz and that of using a sampling rate of 10kHz The sinusoidals signals whose frequency where below half the sampling rate of 10kHz (Nyquist frequency), that is the sinusoidals at 1Hz, 123Hz, 203Hz, 223Hz, 331Hz and 2812Hz are not affected. The ones at ...


3

High frequencies between the Nyquist rate (Fs/2) and the Sample rate (Fs) alias to negative frequencies, due to sampling above the Nyquist rate. And vice versa, negative frequencies alias to the top half of an FFT. "Alias" means you can't tell those frequencies apart at that sample rate, due to the fact that sampling sinewaves at either of those ...



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