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18

To get the power spectrum of a section of your file: collect N samples, where N is a power of 2 - if your sample rate is 44.1 kHz for example and you want to sample approx every second then go for say N = 32768 samples. apply a suitable window function to the samples, e.g. Hanning pass the windowed samples to an FFT routine - ideally you want a ...


14

One important thing to note when you do forward FFT followed by inverse FFT is that this normally results in a scaling factor of N being applied to the final result, i.e. the resulting image pixel values will need to be divided by N in order to match the original pixel values. (N being the size of the FFT.) So your output loop should probably look something ...


12

You could certainly wrap whatever FFT implementation that you wanted to test using Cython or other like-minded tools that allow you to access external libraries. If you're going to test FFT implementations, you might also take a look at GPU-based codes (if you have access to the proper hardware). There are several: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/pyfft ...


11

To convert your audio samples to a power spectrum: if your audio data is integer data then convert it to floating point pick an FFT size (e.g. N=1024) apply a window function to N samples of your data (e.g. Hanning) use a real-to-complex FFT of size N to generate frequency domain data calculate the magnitude of your complex frequency domain data (magnitude ...


11

Well it all depends on the frequency range you're after. An FFT works by taking 2^n samples and providing you with 2^(n-1) real and imaginary numbers. I have to admit I'm quite hazy on what exactly these values represent (I've got a friend who has promised to go through it all with me in lieu of a loan I made him when he had financial issues ;)) other than ...


11

A few observations rather than a definite answer since I do not know any of the specifics of the MATLAB FFT implementation: Based on the code you have, I can see two explanations for the speed difference: the speed difference is explained by differences in levels of optimization of the FFT the while loop in MATLAB is executed a significantly smaller ...


10

The resulting values are scaled really small when the frequency is near a whole number, and they're orders of magnitude larger when the frequency is in between whole numbers. That's because a Fast Fourier Transform assumes the input is periodic and is repeated infinitely. If you have a nonintegral number of sine waves, and you repeat this waveform, it ...


8

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hann_function . The implementation follows from the definition quite straightforwardly. Just use the w(n) function as multiplier, loop through all your samples (changing n as you go), and that's it. for (int i = 0; i < 2048; i++) { double multiplier = 0.5 * (1 - cos(2*PI*i/2047)); dataOut[i] = multiplier * dataIn[i]; ...


8

As Paul said, that's probably not an R package. There is an R package that is a wrapper for the FFTW library, also called fftw, you should install that: Link to CRAN page of fftw In Ubuntu you have then still the system requirement to have a proper installed fftw library, that you probably can solve via sudo apt-get install fftw3 fftw3-dev pkg-config


8

I have used both (OpenCV and FFTW) and you can expect FFTW to be faster than the simpler implementation in OpenCV (how much depends a lot on your processor and image sizes of course). However, if you plan on using your software commercially FFTW has a rather expensive license ($7500.00). In the commercial case, I would recommend Intel's IPP over FFTW as the ...


7

The basic problem is not about zero padding vs the assumed periodicity, but that Fourier analysis decomposes the signal into sine waves which, at the most basic level, are assumed to be infinite in extent. Both approaches are correct in that the IFFT using the full FFT will return the exact input waveform, and both approaches are incorrect in that using ...


7

So it looks like CUFFT is returning a real and imaginary part, and FFTW only the real. The cuCabsf() function that comes iwth the CUFFT complex library causes this to give me a multiple of sqrt(2) when I have both parts of the complex As an aside - I never have been able to get exactly matching results in the intermediate steps between FFTW and CUFFT. If ...


6

A much simpler solution would be to zero the unwanted coefficients and then do an IFFT with FFTW. This will be a lot more efficient than doing an IDFT as above. Note that you may get some artefacts in the time domain when you do this kind of thing - you're effectively multiplying by a step function in the frequency domain, which is equivalent to convolution ...


6

Note that if you include the GPL version of this library in your application, you will need to make the source code of your own application available under the GPL license. It appears that you can buy a license from MIT to incorporate this library within a non-free application. If you are willing to wait for iPhone OS 4 for your application, you will be ...


6

Here's an example of convolution without zero padding for the DFT (circular convolution) vs linear convolution. This is the convolution of a length M=32 sequence with a length L=128 sequence (using Numpy/Matplotlib): f = rand(32); g = rand(128) h1 = convolve(f, g) h2 = real(ifft(fft(f, 128)*fft(g))) plot(h1); plot(h2,'r') grid() The first M-1 points are ...


6

If the name of the library is suffixed with an f, it is single precision. Otherwise it is double. E.g., libfftw3.a is double-precision libfftw3f.a is single-precision


6

I ended up using JNAerator to automatically generate JNA bindings from the header file fftw3.h. The result is available as a gist on Github. The gist (at the bottom) also includes a convenient Scala interface for real transforms of arbitrary dimension.


6

To convolve 2 signals via FFT you generally need to do this: Add as many zeroes to every signal as necessary so its length becomes the cumulative length of the original signals - 1 (that's the length of the result of the convolution). If your FFT library requires input lengths to be powers of 2, add to every signal as many zeroes as necessary to meet that ...


6

You are FFT-ing complex numbers, but you initialized your array as normal (without imaginary part) array. I went ahead onto their side, and found out that there are NEW functions that provide double to complex and complex to double fft-ing. Neat-o! Here: http://www.fftw.org/doc/New_002darray-Execute-Functions.html


6

See see How to get Frequency from FFT result From a 1024 sample input, you can get back 512 meaningful frequency-levels. So, yes, within your window, you'll get back a level for the Nyquist frequency. The lowest frequency level you'll see is for DC (0 Hz), and the next one up will be for SampleRate/1024, or around 44 Hz, the next for 2 * SampleRate/1024, ...


6

It seems that it can be solved without installing the Windows 7.1 SDK Right click on the 'libfftw-3.3' project and selected properties Go to Configuration Properties -> General Switch 'Platfrom Toolset' from 'Windows7.1SDK' to 'v100' Recompile Works for the projects 'libfftwf-3.3' and 'libfftw-3.3' The project 'bench' and 'benchf' are failing to ...


6

This is classic performance gain thanks to low-level and architecture-specific optimization. Matlab uses FFT from the Intel MKL (Math Kernel Library) binary (mkl.dll). These are routines optimized (at assembly level) by Intel for Intel processors. Even on AMD's it seems to give nice performance boosts. FFTW seems like a normal c library that is not as ...


6

The idea behind bit-compatibility of fftw_complex and C99 and C++ complex types is not that they can be easily created from one another, but that all functions in FFTW that take pointers to fftw_complex can also take pointers to c++ std::complex. Therefore the best approach is probably to use std::complex<> throughout your program and only convert ...


6

I would not use FFT data to do such a simple job. Instead, consider running the input signal through 3 simple time domain IIR filters that split the information into low, mid and high signals. This results in 3 time domain signals that are easy to plot. The advantage of this approach is that you do not have to worry about the inverse FFT process that would ...


6

Oh, you're using the R2C mode (don't know why I didn't think of that before). That only writes n/2 + 1 results, because of the symmetry. This behaviour is documented: http://www.fftw.org/doc/One_002dDimensional-DFTs-of-Real-Data.html.


6

You're allocating an array of fftw_complexes, which consist of two elements — the real and complex components — but you're only initializing the real component of each sample. This is probably leaving the complex components containing random data, causing unexpected crazy results! If you don't need to deal with complex samples — which is likely — you may ...


5

I've modified Epskampie's script for IOS 5.0+ Used with fftw3.3.3 on OS X 10.7 with IOS SDK 6.0 and MacOSX SDK 10.8 #!/bin/sh # build_ios5.sh # build an arm / i386 / x86_64 lib of fftw3 # make sure to check that all the paths used in this script exist on your system # # adopted from: # http://robertcarlsen.net/2009/07/15/cross-compiling-for-iphone-dev-884 ...


5

It's pretty much all written in the FFTW documentation about thread safety: ... but some care must be taken because the planner routines share data (e.g. wisdom and trigonometric tables) between calls and plans. The upshot is that the only thread-safe (re-entrant) routine in FFTW is fftw_execute (and the new-array variants thereof). All other ...


5

Finally here is the code: class Peak { public: CvPoint pt; double maxval; }; Peak old_opencv_FFT(IplImage* src,IplImage* temp) { CvSize imgSize = cvSize(src->width, src->height); // Allocate floating point frames used for DFT (real, imaginary, and complex) IplImage* realInput = cvCreateImage( imgSize, IPL_DEPTH_64F, 1 ); ...


5

16 FFT is very small. What you will find is FFTs smaller than say 64 will be hard coded assembler with no loops to get the highest possible performance. This means they can be highly susceptible to variations in instruction sets, compiler optimisations, even 64 or 32bit words. What happens when you run a test of FFT sizes from 16 -> 1048576 in powers of 2? ...



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