Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

List comprehensions model Non-determinism Cartesian products Nested for-loops which are all equivalent. So your Fibonacci sequence is wrong because it's computing way too many elements. In pseudocode it's a bit like fibonacci = for i in 1:fibonacci: for j in 0:1:fibonacci: i + j What you really want is to zip the lists together, to ...


6

List comprehensions don't work like that. You've written a nested traversal, whereas what you are trying to do is a zip. To see the difference, consider: Prelude> let fibs = [ a + b | (a,b) <- zip (1 : fibs) (0 : 1 : fibs) ] Prelude> take 10 fibs [1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89] Which works as you'd expect. There is a syntactic extension to Haskell ...


5

int a =0; int n = 3; n -= 2; if (n == 1){ cout << a << endl; } You have n equal to 3, you subtract 2, thus n equal to 1, so, you enter the if body and output a, which is zero. [EDIT] You don't seem to get any input -as stated in a comment- in your program (you could use std::cin or std::getline() for this), but you probably mean that ...


4

The problem With: fibonacci = [a + b | a <- 1:fibonacci, b <- 0:1:fibonacci] you are generating every possible combinations of the two lists. For example with: x = [a + b | a <- [1, 2], b <- [3, 4]] the result will be: [1 + 3, 1 + 4, 2 + 3, 2 + 4] Live demo With zipWith The closest you can get is with zipWith: fibonacci :: [Int] ...


4

Naive fibonacci makes a lot of repeat calculations - in fib(14) fib(4) is calculated many times. You can add caching to your algorithm to make it a lot faster: def fib(n, cache = {}) if n == 0 || n == 1 return n end cache[n] ||= fib(n-1, cache) + fib(n-2, cache) end fib 14 # => 377 fib 24 # => 46368 fib 124 # => ...


2

You can use Binet's Formula: n -n F(n) = phi - (-phi) --------------- sqrt(5) where phi is the golden ratio (( 1 + sqrt(5) ) / 2) ~= 1.61803... This lets you determine exactly the n-th term of the sequence.


2

Your program has exponential runtime due to the recursion you use. Expanding only the recursive calls a few levels to show you why: fib(14) = fib(13) + fib(12) = (fib(12) + fib(11)) + (fib(11) + fib (10)) = (((fib(11) + fib(10)) + (fib(10) + fib(9))) (((fib(10) + fib(9)) + (fib(9) + fib(8))) = ... //a ton more calls The terrible ...


2

Do not call scanner.close(); When you do that, you close() System.in! Then when you attempt to construct your new Scanner(System.in); it doesn't work (because System.in is closed).


2

The sequence you want is 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, ... As I pointed out in a comment to another answer, your code does not produce a correct Fibonacci sequence. F(3) isn't the problem with your code; the problem is that you get confused between all the variables, a, b, c and use them to mean different things at once. ...


2

Your example works okay for me on repl.it (though it does take pretty long time to run): Benchmark.bm do |x| x.report do fib(15) end end Output: user system total real 0.000000 0.000000 0.000000 ( 10.064000) On my machine, Ruby 2.0, Intel Core 2 Duo CPU: Benchmark.bm do |x| x.report do fib(15) ...


2

Consider the following problem : In how many ways can you go up a ladder of n steps if you can take either a single step at a time or 2 steps at a time? Solution 1 : Let's construct a recurrence relation for this problem. It's pretty clear that the recurrence would be something like this : a(n) = a(n-1) + a(n-2); where a(1)=1 and a(2)=2 Thus, the answer ...


2

The problem with that function, as described are the non-tail recursive calls. This means that the recursivity involved here needs a stack to work (in your sample, it's the call stack). In other words, that function is roughly the equivalent of: import scala.collection.mutable.Stack def fibonacci(n: Int): BigInt = { var result = BigInt(0) val stack = ...


1

It sounds like you might be used to for loops from C or another language with similar constructs. In Python, for i in range(n): means "run the code inside this block once for each value in the list of numbers between 0 and n-1, setting i to each number in turn". (Technically in Python 3 it's not a list but an iterator that generates the numbers ...


1

You can prove it by induction. Let ONES(x) be the number of 1s in the binary string x. The outputs of F(0) and F(1) satisfy the property you mentioned, i.e., ONES(F(0)) = FIB(0) and ONES(F(1)) = FIB(1). Now, if you assume that for all m<=n, n>=1, ONES(F(m)) = FIB(m) then ONES(F(n+1)) = ONES(F(n) concat F(n-1)) = ONES(F(n)) + ...


1

I've just written my own little implementation using an Object to store already computed results. I've written it in Node.JS, which needed 2ms (according to my timer) to calculate the fibonacci for 1476. Here's the code stripped down to pure Javascript: var nums = {}; // Object that stores already computed fibonacci results function fib(n) { //Function ...


1

I'm no fortran expert, but I did take a class once... Apparently you're using a four byte integer (http://www-classes.usc.edu/engr/ce/108/text/fbk01.htm) for these. After, 1836311903 you're exceeding the maximum integer value (2147483647) and the calculations are overflowing. You have two options for calculating fibonacci numbers with more precision. ...


1

This one will calculate many sub-problems more than once. You can think of the algorithm as a tree. For example if you ask for fibonacci(4) you calculate: fib(4) = fib(3) + fib(2) = 2 + 1 = 3 // left subtree: fib(3) = fib(2) + fib(1) = 1+1 = 2 // left fib(2) = fib(1) + fib(0) = 0+1 = 1 // right fib(1) = 1 // right fib(2) = fib(1) + ...


1

As others have pointed out, your implementation's run time grows exponentially in n. There are much cleaner implementations. Constructive [O(n) run time, O(1) storage]: def fib(n) raise "fib not defined for negative numbers" if n < 0 new, old = 1, 0 n.times {new, old = new + old, new} old end Memoized recursion [O(n) run time, O(n) storage]: ...


1

your program overflows as Kevin L explained. instead, you can use an iterative algorithm like this: def fib (n) return 0 if n == 0 x = 0 y = 1 (1..n).each do z = (x + y) x = y y = z end return y end (0..14).map { |n| fib(n) } # [0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610]


1

Using a loop you could store the values in an array that could stop immediately one key after finding the selected number in the previous keys value. function getFib($n) { $fib = array($n+1); // array to num + 1 $fib[0] = 0; $fib[1] = 1; // set initial array keys $i; for ($i=2;$i<=$n+1;$i++) { $fib[$i] = $fib[$i-1]+$fib[$i-2]; ...


1

This might be similar to user635541's answer. I don't fully understand his approach. Using the matrix representation for Fibonacci numbers, discussed in other answers, we get a way to go from F_n and F_m to F_{n+m} and F_{n-m} in constant time, using only plus, multiplication, minus and division (actually not! see the update). We also have a zero (the ...


1

For your reference, here is the syntax fixed version of your code: mortalRabbits xs 0 = xs mortalRabbits xs n = mortalRabbits xs' (n-1) where xs' = updateRabbits xs updateRabbits (x:xs) = case x of 0 -> [1] ++ updateRabbits xs 1 -> [2, 0] ++ updateRabbits xs 2 -> [3, 0] ++ updateRabbits xs 3 -> [] ++ ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible