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10

The evaluation took longer than you expected because your function does not use memoization. See e.g. this question or that question for answers to how to define the fibonacci function in Haskell using memoization.


7

Did you compare that time to other languages? This is recursive algorithm that has O(2^n) complexity. At n=33 that gives a staggering amount of calls. If you count how many miliseconds or nanoseconds there were per such call you are left with a very remarkable answer as to the actual performance. Remember, that some compilers/execution environment might ...


5

The simplest and most natural way is to test if sum >= 1000000.


5

When n>20, you can first reach 20th floor, then go all the way up => stairs(20) you can also reach 19th floor, then go to 21st floor, from 21st floor, you have stairs(n-21) ways to floor n, so => stairs(19)*stairs(n-21) So sum it up is stairs(20) + stairs(19) * stairs(n-21). You may use dynamic programming to avoid calculating the same value.


3

Your algorithm is not very good. You can improve it a little bit using memoization, up to O(n). Using divide and conquer, you can get up to O(log n): import Data.Matrix fib :: Integer -> Integer fib n = ((fromLists [[1,1],[1,0]]) ^ n) ! (1,2) The idea is, that multiplication is associative, so you can put your braces on strategic places: 5^10 = (5 ...


3

I am not sure exactly what you are asking, maybe you can clarify The time complexity of this algorithm is O(n). The loop will execute n times until i is greater than n. i starts at zero and increments by 1 every iteration of this loop until n. I hope this helps


2

I haven't checked for performance, but this appears to be a faithful implementation in Clojure: (defn fib [n] (letfn [(fib* [n] (if (zero? n) [0 1] (let [[a b] (fib* (quot n 2)) c (*' a (-' (*' 2 b) a)) d (+' (*' b b) (*' a a))] (if (even? n) ...


2

When Question == "Number", your for loop iterates over the sequence range (int(X) - 2, int(X) - 1). When you input 10 for X, this evaluates to range(8, 9), which is of length one. As a result, the loop is only executed once. Since both loops are otherwise the same, and count is never used inside the loop body, you get the same result as if you ran the ...


2

The difference between a,b=b,a+b and a=b b=a+b is that in the second one, a is assigned value of b, and then b is assigned the sum of a and b, which means it is twice its original value. Consider: a = 1 b = 2 a,b = b,a+b This gives a==2 (old value of b) b==3 (sum of 1 and 2) Contrarily: a = 1 b = 2 a = b b = a + b which gives: a==2 (old ...


2

The basic recursion scheme is the following int stairs(unsigned int n) { if (n < 2) return 1; return stairs(n-1) + stairs(n-2); } Now, the question you must ask yourself is how the rule applied to stair 20 will modify the recursion scheme ? If n > 20, then stairs(n) will be equal to stairs(20) + ...


1

The difference is that, when you do: a,b=b,a+b # ^ the a that I marked is the original value of a, not the updated value. This is because Python always evaluates what is on the right of the = sign before it evaluates what is on the left. When you do this however: a=b b=a+b the a in the second line is the new value of a that was assigned in the ...


1

Among many solutions, a simple one would be to use StringBuilder: StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); do { ... sb.AppendFormat("{0} ", num2); } while (sum <= 100) lblOUT.Text = sb.ToString(); You could also store the numbers in a list and use String.Join among other solutions.


1

lblOUT.Text += Convert.ToString(num2) + Environment.NewLine; That should be it


1

The Scala API docs for Stream contains an example on how to do this in Scala: val fibs: Stream[BigInt] = BigInt(0) #:: BigInt(1) #:: fibs.zip(fibs.tail).map { n => n._1 + n._2 } Edit: To implement memoization in a language which doesn't have it built-in like Haskell, you would obviously need to use mutation (an array or a map). For example: val fib: ...


1

In C# you can implement this in the next way: IEnumerable <int> Fibonacci() { var a = 0; var b = 1; while (true) { var t = b; yield return b = a + b; a = t; } }


1

This if (n===1||2) { needs to be if (n===1||n===2) { Your code is evaluating the truthiness of 2, which is always true. Also, it's unnecessary to evaluate i===n during each iteration. This will be true only after the last iteration of the loop, so just alert(y) after the loop.


1

This solution might shed some light on your problem and help solve it. Question = raw_input("Enter Type: ") num = raw_input("Terms: ") def fibonacci(n): if n <= 1: return n else: print(fibonacci(n-1) + fibonacci(n-2)) # take input from the user if Question == "List": for counter in range(0, int(num)): print ...


1

You just need to keep in memory two numbers to calculate fibonacci. And if you get a higher value than the one you are looking for, that's not a fibonacci number: long t; std::cin >> t; long cur = 1; long prev = 0; while (cur < t) { long next = cur + prev; prev = cur; cur = next; } if (cur == t || t == 0) std::cout << " is ...


1

If you just want to reverse the list at the end, use reverse/2: fib(N, F) :- fib(N, 0, [1], FRev), reverse(FRev, F). If you want to built the list in the reversed order, you would have to rethink the clauses. One solution is to use last/2 and append/3 to put new elements at the end of the accumulator, not in front of it. After returning the first ...


1

Your code would throw ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsEception in some cases. Let's consider what you are doing : You are getting an input x from user Then you create array a with x elements, input by user Then you find the max element of a You create an array fib of max elements, and calculate fib[i] for each i from 0 to max-1 Suppose the user inputs : 2 2 2 max ...



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