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33

I'm not sure whether it is a new feature in later versions of matplotlib, but at least for 1.3.1, this is simply: plt.title(figure_title, y=1.08) This also works for plt.suptitle(), but not (yet) for plt.xlabel(), etc.


5

Setting the property NextPlot of the current figure to new will create a new plot on the next call to plot(). Here's a small example: plot(1:10, 1:10); % create a figure set(gcf, 'NextPlot', 'new'); % next plot goes in new figure plot(1:10, 1:10); The CurrentFigure property you tried to change just stores the handle to the figure that has been ...


5

If I extend a little bit your example to get something I can plot, I do reproduce the problem: [th,r] = meshgrid((0:0.5:360)*pi/180,0:.02:1); [X,Y] = pol2cart(th,r); Z = sqrt( X.^2 + Y.^2 ) ; isoLevel = 0:0.1:10 ; [C ,hc] = contourf(X,Y,Z,isoLevel) ; The black line at the interface is because the function contourf create patch objects and these objects ...


4

Have you considered using the multiprocessing module to parallelize processing the files? Assuming that you're actually CPU-bound here (meaning it's the fourier transform that's eating up most of the running time, not reading/writing the files), that should speed up execution time without actually needing to speed up the loop itself. Edit: For example, ...


4

This is a documented limitation of printing in headless mode: Printing and Exporting without a Display On a UNIX platform (including Macintosh), where you can start in MATLAB nodisplay mode (matlab -nodisplay), you can print using most of the drivers you can use with a display and export to most of the same file formats. The PostScript and ...


4

There's a figure property you need to change for that: set(fHandle,'Resize','off');


4

Every time you are creating plots you might get this error - "Error in plot.new() : figure margins too large". To avoid such errors you can first check par("mar") output. You should be getting: [1] 5.1 4.1 4.1 2.1 To change that write: par(mar=c(1,1,1,1)) This should rectify the error. Or else you can change the values accordingly. Hope this works ...


4

What you could do is use solve and allow MATLAB's symbolic solver to symbolically solve for an expression of y in terms of x. Once you do this, you can use subs to substitute values of x into the expression found from solve and plot all of these together. Bear in mind that you will need to cast the result of subs with double because you want the numerical ...


4

Ok I was about to write my answer and I just saw that @rayryeng proposed a similar idea (Good job Ray!) but here it goes. The idea is also to use solve to get an expression for y, then convert the symbolic function to an anonymous function and then plot it. The code is general for any number of solutions you get from solve: clear clc close all syms x y ...


4

I think what you are after is the DefaultLineLineWidth property, to which you can assign a value for a particular figure (or the root). Here is a simple code illustrating; basically I create a figure, set its 'visible' property to 'off' and assign a default line linewidth (that sounds weird...). The line plotted has a linewidth of 4, whereas another plot ...


4

The code below: %// x = linspace(0,2); %// changed that to respect where the markers are on your example figure x = 0:0.1:2 ; y1 = sin(2*pi*x); y2 = exp(-0.5*2*pi*x).*sin(2*pi*x); figure h.axtop = subplot(2,1,1) ; h.plottop = plot(x,y1,'LineStyle','-','Color','r', ... 'Marker','s', ... 'MarkerEdgeColor','k', ... ...


3

Make your image display block, like so: figure img { display: block; } Example using your code: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/dazFt


3

You need to move the ticks, but get the labels before and write them back after moving: f = figure(1) X = randi(10,10,10); surf(X) view(0,90) ax = gca; XTick = get(ax, 'XTick') XTickLabel = get(ax, 'XTickLabel') set(ax,'XTick',XTick+0.5) set(ax,'XTickLabel',XTickLabel) YTick = get(ax, 'YTick') YTickLabel = get(ax, 'YTickLabel') set(ax,'YTick',YTick+0.5) ...


3

This happens because the title is added to the subplot, then it is cleared when plot is called. To avoid this, simply call title after calling plot, like so: figure subplot(2,1,1); plot(A); title('A') hold on; plot(B,'rs'); plot(C,'gs'); subplot(2,1,2); plot(D); title('D') hold on; plot(E,'rs'); plot(F,'gs'); saveas(h,namejpg,'jpg');


3

Since this is tagged RStudio, I assume you are using RStudio, which may be the problem. I believe this can happen when your plot panel in RStudio is too small for the margins of the plot you are trying to create. Try making expanding it and then run your code again.


3

caption is only valid as a child of table. The MDN docs for caption note: Usage note: When the <table> element that is the parent of this <caption> is the only descendant of a <figure> element, use the <figcaption> element instead. I'd leave out the title attribute as it doesn't contribute anything.


3

[Edit: Figures added] What you want to achieve is described in the last example of ?wireframe levelplot(s, contour = TRUE, par.settings = list(axis.line = list(col = "transparent")), scales = list(col = "black")) If you want to remove strip background and color: levelplot(s, contour=TRUE, par.settings = list(axis.line = list(col = "transparent"), ...


3

The problem is that Matlab supports only one colormap per figure, you are trying to use two: gray for the image and jet for the surfplot. A workaround is to trick Matlab to believe the image is in color ;) figure; subplot(1,2,1); surf(data); shading interp; subplot(1,2,2); imshow( grayimg(:,:,[1 1 1]) ); % this is the trick: you convert one channel image ...


3

Matlab plots directly inside c++ GUI This is what you need. You have to import FindWindow() method from User32.dll. It returns a pointer to the window which name you pass as the second argument. After you got the pointer, you have to set it's parent, using SetParent() method, which you can get from User32.dll aswell. In order to get a pointer to your form, ...


3

subplot2grid is a very nice feature for more complicated layouts. You define a grid and add axes to it at the grid positions, in this case i used 3 cols and 3 rows. You can define a row- and colspan for axes covering more than one grid position. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig = plt.figure() ...


3

You can introduce a new white bounding box and put it on top. // example data x = linspace(-4,4,100); y = 16 - x.^2; plot(x,y); hold on ax1 = gca; set(ax1,'box','off') %// here you can basically decide whether you like ticks on %// top and on the right side or not %// new white bounding box on top ax2 = axes('Position', get(ax1, ...


3

You could use legend(['\tau = ',num2str(tau)],'Location','NorthWestOutside')


3

Use margin: 0 auto to main-content: @charset"utf-8"; /* CSS */ body {} .top-content { text-align: center; } header { font-family: "Ostrich Sans Rounded", sans-serif; font-size: 72px; } #quote { font-style: italic; font-size: 20px; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5); } nav li { display: inline-block; font-size: 25px; ...


3

Step 1 Check whether you're running in interactive mode. The default is non-interactive, but you may never know: >>> import matplotlib as mpl >>> mpl.is_interactive() False You can set the mode explicitly to non-interactive by using >>> from matplotlib import pyplot as plt >>> plt.ioff() Since the default is ...


3

You can use the following trick: Fill normally, as you do in your code. No need for coloring the edges; it will be done later. Draw a white rectangular patch to cover the part you don't want filled. No edge color here either. Plot the lines on top of that. Code: x = 0:0.5:6; y = [3 2.5 1 1 1 2.5 3 2.5 1 1 1 2.5 3]; yline(1:13) = 2; figure(1) fill([x ...


3

When using subplots_adjust, the values of left, right, bottom and top are to be provided as fractions of the figure width and height. In additions, all values are measured from the left and bottom edges of the figure. This is why right and top can't be lower than left and right. A typical set-up is: plt.subplots_adjust(left=0.1, right=0.9, bottom=0.1, ...


3

There's actually nothing wrong with your graph. The reason why you see the graph like that is because the z axis is too large. The z values that actually define most of its shape are orders of magnitude smaller than the highest values seen in that graph... in the order of thousands. The reason why is because when the values of u and v are +/- pi/2, tan is ...


2

Since changing the color map of one axes in a figure via colormap changes it for all axes in the figure, you need to use a workaround to get different color maps in your individual subplots. The MathWorks article "Using multiple colormaps in a single figure" lists three methods: Combine multiple colormaps into one, and use different portions of the ...


2

If you want to keep distances between x-values (e.g. 1:9) and only change the labels (not the distances between x-values), try this: y = rand(9,6); labels = [100 200 400 1000 2000 5000 10000 20000 50000]; plot(y); set(gca, 'XTick', 1:length(labels)); % Change x-axis ticks set(gca, 'XTickLabel', labels); % Change x-axis ticks labels.


2

As shown in the documentation, you can set the labels as follows: plt.xticks(locations, labels) If you don't want to change the tick locations, you can do: plt.xticks(plt.xticks()[0], labels)



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