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23

Ahh, the method has been renamed to compare_file in FileUtils. There's also an alias of "cmp" in both versions.


8

The hexdigest operation is read-once, meaning that after you execute it, the value is reset. It can be read only once, but you attempt to read it twice. Store it in a temporary when you read it the first time. From the documentation (my emphasis): $md5->digest Return the binary digest for the message. The returned string will be 16 bytes long. ...


8

You're trying to solve the same problem that every MMORPG has solved... creating and applying small patch files to update older versions of large binaries. This is a well-studied problem and there are a number of solutions out there. For several existing options, see Binary patch-generation in C#


7

You can pipe an N in there: echo N | comp file1.txt file2.txt


6

The differences will be the timestamp in the PE header the GUID of the debug data, if present (and maybe something more, as per the other output you've posted?) To see these, run dumpbin /all /rawdata:none on both assemblies in a VS command prompt. To do this properly you'd have to write a comparison tool that understood this and ignored those bytes - ...


6

There is quite a few software products that claim to diff pdfs. I've never had need to use one but if this is going to be a recurring process I think it'd be wise for your company to invest in one of them. Just Google "pdf diff" for a bunch of potential applications. Additionally, your situation is very similar to this question: ...


5

I am a developer of Docotic.Pdf Library. We use PDF comparison in unit tests for checking that test produces PDF as expected. PDF is a collection of special objects and we compare all PDF objects ignoring some properties like trailer IDs and creator info. This implementation works fine. You can try the method PdfDocument.DocumentsAreEqual. This method just ...


5

You're misunderstanding the documentation. Line #2 says: Unless shallow is given and is false, files with identical os.stat() signatures are taken to be equal. Files with identical os.stat() signatures are taken to be equal, but the logical inverse is not true: files with unequal os.stat() signatures are not necessarily taken to be unequal. Rather, ...


5

Using itertools.izip and enumerate: import itertools with open('file1.txt') as f1, open('file2.txt') as f2: for lineno, (line1, line2) in enumerate(itertools.izip(f1, f2), 1): if line1 != line2: print 'mismatch in line no:', lineno


5

You could use grep -f to look for search patterns that are listed in a separate file. It'd probably be good to use the -F (fixed strings) and -w (match whole words) flags as well. grep -Fw -f File2.txt File1.txt > Match.txt grep -Fwv -f File2.txt File1.txt > Non_Match.txt


5

I am not sure that function does what you think it does. From the docs, Unless shallow is given and is false, files with identical os.stat() signatures are taken to be equal. Your call is comparing only the signature of os.stat, which only includes: File mode Modified Time Size You can learn all three of these things in Go from the os.Stat ...


4

I use Beyond Compare (not free, but I think a shareware version is available). You can select the same file for left and right sides, then right-click the beginning of your section on each side and select "Align Manually". This would allow you to compare two sections of the same file relatively easily. Overall, I highly recommend the product. I haven't ...


4

Looking at the code of org.eclipse.comparator.internal.CompareEditor (which is the name of the class of the editor illustrated in your question), I do not see any indication of a different "orientation" (horizontal layout vs. vertical layout) So, no. I do not think the current implementation allows you to compare files with a different layout.


4

Load each file into a string array (using file_get_contents, for example). Perform some loops that, for every item in array 2, determine if the item exists in array 1. If so, remove the item from array 2 and continue. When complete, array 2 will contain only unique lines. Edit: If you just want to remove lines in File2 that are also present in File1, ...


4

The FINDSTR method that foxidrive shows is definitely the fastest pure batch way to approach the problem, especially if file2 is large. However, there are a number of scenarios that can cause it to fail: regex meta-charactes in file 1, quotes and/or backslashes in file 1, etc. See What are the undocumented features and limitations of the Windows FINDSTR ...


4

There is a lot of things to say but I'll try to stay concise. PEP8: Style Guide for Python Code You should use lower case with underscores for local variables. take a look at the PEP8: Style Guide for Python Code. File objects and with statement Use the with statement to open a file, see: File Objects: ...


4

Yes, this should work. From the documentation: A canonical pathname is both absolute and unique. The precise definition of canonical form is system-dependent. This method first converts this pathname to absolute form if necessary, as if by invoking the getAbsolutePath() method, and then maps it to its unique form in a system-dependent way. This typically ...


4

To complete the @captncraig answer, if you want to know if the two files are the same, you can use the SameFile(fi1, fi2 FileInfo) method from the OS package. SameFile reports whether fi1 and fi2 describe the same file. For example, on Unix this means that the device and inode fields of the two underlying structures are identical; Otherwise, if you ...


4

Old question, but I just got here from google. identical? is available for those who like me prefer that coding style. FileUtils.identical?(exp, act)


3

I went the approach to getting the raw data out of the PDF, then making use of Word or TortiseSVN, or WinMerge, etc...to take care of the comparison piece. In my instance I did the comparison in a RichTextBox in C#...coloring the differences, etc...since we wanted it all within our app. Here is what I did... PDF comparison as I was trying to compare mixed ...


3

Instead of rolling your own, you might consider leveraging an open source version control system (eg, Subversion). You get a lot more than just a delta versioning algorithm that way.


3

What you are seeing (obviously) is either line truncation (-w 130) or line wrap (-w 170) relative to the line length in your terminal session. I don't believe there is an option to do what you desire. I've used sdiff a lot & tend to use a terminal/CLI that supports changing font sizes. Shrink the font to something still readable & then maximise ...


3

For algorithms like these I suggest you look into the bioinformatics area. There is a similar problem setting there in that you have large files (genome sequences) in which you are looking for certain signatures (genes, special well-known short base sequences, etc.). Also for considering polymorphic malware, this sector should offer you a lot, because in ...


3

Here are some implementations http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/diffengine.aspx written some time ago but is entirely public domain http://www.mathertel.de/Diff/ Based on Eugene Myers classic algorithm. currently BSD licensed Also old but the algorithm and implementation are well established and stable http://www.menees.com/DiffDotNet.htm as an ...


3

If you can use languages like perl or python with builtin support for hashes/dictionnaries, it's really easy. Loop over file names and signature and create a hash with md5sum as key and list of files with that md5 as value. Then loop over content of hash and show entries with more than one item. These are files likely to be identical (you can't be really ...


3

If you replace the value of any %variable% inside parentheses, that value is the same the variable had before enter the parentheses: set var=Old value ( set var=New value & echo %var% ) Previous code always show: Old value To solve this problem you must use Delayed Expansion, that is, enclose the variable in exclamation marks instead percents and add ...


3

As usual eof() is the wrong thing to do. This works while (std::getline(file_1, dummy_1) && std::getline(file_2, dummy_2)) { ... } Suggest you read up on what eof() really does. it doesn't to what you think, but actually it will be useful in this program because you can use it the proper way, to tell which of your two files has hit the end of ...


3

As john pointed out. Using eof() in the condition is usually wrong. But in this case I think it is appropriate. But as a result you need to add some extra checks. while(true) // exit provided by break. { std::string dummy_1; // By declaring them here you force them to be std::string dummy_2; // reset each iteration. // Because you are ...


3

I started by writing rather a long comment on @Loki Astari's answer, but it's long enough (and, IMO, enough cleaner way to do the job) that it probably makes the most sense as an independent answer. In this case, you want something close to the standard loop, except that you keep reading as long as a read from one of the files succeeds. That being the case, ...


3

The syntax error is caused by the wrong placed opening parenthesis, but even then the code doesn't work as expected. You compare each line from file1 against each line of file2, but you output for each unequal compare, not only when no match is found. for /f %%a in (file1.txt) do ( set "matchFound=" for /f %%b in (file2.txt) do ( if ...



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