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118

A single listening port can accept more than one connection simultaneously. There is a '64K' limit that is often cited, but that is per client per server port, and needs clarifying. Each TCP/IP packet has basically four fields for addressing; these are: source_ip source_port destination_ip destination_port < client > < server ...


82

In simple words, when you open a file, the operating system creates an entry to represent that file and store the information about that opened file. So if there are 100 files opened in your OS then there will be 100 entries in OS (somewhere in kernel). These entries are represented by integers like (...100, 101, 102....). This entry number is the file ...


48

It's probably trying to open the default browser and failing to do so. Try using: $ resque-web -L To avoid starting a browser.


45

I don't know why you are trying to do this, but you should be able to attach to the process using gdb and then call close() on the fd. Example: In one shell: cat In another shell: $pidof cat 7213 $gdb -p 7213 ... lots of output ... (gdb) Now you tell gdb to execute close(0): (gdb) p close(0) $1 = 0 (gdb) c Continuing. Program exited with code ...


43

While portable, closing all file descriptors up to sysconf(_SC_OPEN_MAX) is not reliable, because on most systems this call returns the current file descriptor soft limit, which could have been lowered below the highest used file descriptor. Another issue is that on many systems sysconf(_SC_OPEN_MAX) may return INT_MAX, which can cause this approach to be ...


40

A file descriptor is a low-level integer "handle" used to identify an opened file (or socket, or whatever) at the kernel level, in Linux and other Unix-like systems. You pass "naked" file descriptors to actual Unix calls, such as read(), write() and so on. A FILE pointer is a C standard library-level construct, used to represent a file. The FILE wraps the ...


28

One is buffered (FILE *) and the other is not. In practice, you want to use FILE * almost always when you are reading from a 'real' file (ie. on the drive), unless you know what you are doing or unless your file is actually a socket or so.. You can get the file descriptor from the FILE * using fileno() and you can open a buffered FILE * from a file ...


28

Count the entries in /proc/<pid>/fd/. The hard and soft limits applying to the process can be found in /proc/<pid>/limits.


28

From the answer given by √Čric Malenfant: AFAIK, there is no way to do this in standard C++. Depending on your platform, your implementation of the standard library may offer (as a nonstandard extension) a fstream constructor taking a file descriptor as input. (This is the case for libstdc++, IIRC) or a FILE*. Based on above observations ...


27

The only interfaces provided by the Linux kernel to get resource limits are getrlimit() and /proc/pid/limits. getrlimit() can only get resource limits of the calling process. /proc/pid/limits allows you to get the resource limits of any process with the same user id, and is available on RHEL 5.2, RHEL 4.7, Ubuntu 9.04, and any distribution with a 2.6.24 or ...


26

History, if nothing else. Back in the 1970s, it probably didn't seem like a problem to just use int (and the value was, in fact, an index into a fixed size table). Later, changing it to another type would have broken code.


23

It's important to distinguish between the file descriptor, which is a small integer that the process uses in its read and write calls to identify the file, and the file description, which is a structure in the kernel. The file offset is part of the file description. It lives in the kernel. As an example, let's use this program: #include <unistd.h> ...


23

Just use: position = lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_CUR);


20

fcntl(fd, F_GETFD) is the canonical cheapest way to check that fd is a valid open file descriptor. If you need to batch-check a lot, using poll with a zero timeout and the events member set to 0 and checking for POLLNVAL in revents after it returns is more efficient. With that said, the operation "check if a given resource handle is still valid" is almost ...


19

ulimit -n 10000 That might not work depending on you system configuration Consult this to configure your system.


18

Using the graceful-fs module by Isaac Schlueter (node.js maintainer) is probably the most appropriate solution. It does incremental back-off if EMFILE is encountered. It can be used as a drop-in replacement for the built-in fs module.


15

Your question can be divided in two: Why is POSIX file descriptor int? Like most of things in already established tools and libraries, the answer is probably historical reasons. James' answer points this out. Making the file descriptor opaque is probably a good idea, but not for the reason you mentioned. Making the type opaque is good for having a ...


15

A file descriptor is an opaque handle that is used in the interface between user space and the kernel to identify file/socket resources. Therefore when you use open() or socket() (system calls to interface to the kernel) you are returned a file descriptor, which is an integer (it is actually an index into the processes u structure - but that is not ...


15

TL; DR All File and IO objects are stored in ObjectSpace. Answer The ObjectSpace class says: The ObjectSpace module contains a number of routines that interact with the garbage collection facility and allow you to traverse all living objects with an iterator. How I Tested This I tested this at the console on Ruby 1.9.3p194. The test fixture is ...


14

When select returns, it has updated the sets to show which file descriptors have become ready for read/write/exception. All other flags have been cleared. It's important that you re-enable the file descriptors that were cleared prior to starting another select, otherwise, you will no longer be waiting on those file descriptors. As for re-clearing, it can ...


14

AFAIK, there is no way to do this in standard C++. Depending on your platform, your implementation of the standard library may offer (as a nonstandard extension) a fstream constructor taking a file descriptor as input. (This is the case for libstdc++, IIRC) or a FILE*. Another alternative would be to use a boost::iostreams::file_descriptor device, which you ...


14

Sorry for the extremely long answer; I have a feeling that I'll need to refer to this method several dozen times in my life, so I'll write "one answer to rule them all". I'll first babble a little about files, file descriptors, (named) pipes, and output redirection, and then answer your question. Consider this simple C99 program: #include <stdio.h> ...


13

Since you're on Linux, you've (almost certainly) got the /proc filesystem mounted. That means that the easiest method is going to be to get a list of the contents of /proc/self/fd; each file in there is named after a FD. (Use g_dir_open, g_dir_read_name and g_dir_close to do the listing, of course.) Getting the information otherwise is moderately awkward ...


13

On Unix (which I assume you're using because you're mentioning fcntl) it does open a file descriptor, as fopen(3) eventually calls open(2). You can get that file descriptor via fileno(3).


12

O_NONBLOCK is a property of the open file description, not of the file descriptor, nor of the underlying file. Yes, you could have separate file descriptors open for the same file, one of which is blocking and the other of which is non-blocking. You need to distinguish between a FIFO (created using mkfifo()) and a pipe (created using pipe()). Note that ...


11

They exist in unistd.h on a POSIX machine. STDOUT_FILENO, STDIN_FILENO, and STDERR_FILENO. See: http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/basedefs/unistd.h.html


11

Okay, I've arrived to the conclusion that errors like: Prepare failed.: status=0x1 (when calling prepare() ) and setDataSourceFD failed.: status=0x80000000 (when calling setDataSourceFD() ) have to do with the file format and probably mean that the file is incomplete, corrupted or something like that... As I have post in this link, I've found an ...


11

For when graceful-fs doesn't work... or you just want to understand where the leak is coming from. Follow this process. (e.g. graceful-fs isn't gonna fix your wagon if your issue is with sockets.) From My Blog Article: http://www.blakerobertson.com/devlog/2014/1/11/how-to-determine-whats-causing-error-connect-emfile-nodejs.html How To Isolate This ...


10

You opened that FIFO as read only (O_RDONLY), whenever there is no writer to the FIFO, the read end will receive an EOF. Select system call will return on EOF and for every EOF you handle there will be a new EOF. This is the reason for the observed behavior. To avoid this open that FIFO for both reading and writing (O_RDWR). This ensures that you have at ...


10

Nothing -- the call to register the fd will (at least for common Linux filesystems) fail with EPERM. I tested this using the following demo program: #include <sys/epoll.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { int ep = epoll_create1(0); int fd = ...



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