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26

History, if nothing else. Back in the 1970s, it probably didn't seem like a problem to just use int (and the value was, in fact, an index into a fixed size table). Later, changing it to another type would have broken code.


15

Your question can be divided in two: Why is POSIX file descriptor int? Like most of things in already established tools and libraries, the answer is probably historical reasons. James' answer points this out. Making the file descriptor opaque is probably a good idea, but not for the reason you mentioned. Making the type opaque is good for having a ...


10

You opened that FIFO as read only (O_RDONLY), whenever there is no writer to the FIFO, the read end will receive an EOF. Select system call will return on EOF and for every EOF you handle there will be a new EOF. This is the reason for the observed behavior. To avoid this open that FIFO for both reading and writing (O_RDWR). This ensures that you have at ...


10

For when graceful-fs doesn't work... or you just want to understand where the leak is coming from. Follow this process. (e.g. graceful-fs isn't gonna fix your wagon if your issue is with sockets.) From My Blog Article: http://www.blakerobertson.com/devlog/2014/1/11/how-to-determine-whats-causing-error-connect-emfile-nodejs.html How To Isolate This ...


8

Hear it from the Horse's Mouth : APUE (Richard Stevens). To the kernel, all open files are referred to by File Descriptors. A file descriptor is a non-negative number. When we open an existing file or create a new file, the kernel returns a file descriptor to the process. The kernel maintains a table of all open file descriptors, which are in use. The ...


5

This needs to be added to your Upstart script for it to work: limit nofile 50000 50000 "It's by design that upstart does not look at /etc/security/limits.conf for system jobs. PAM settings are only applied to user sessions, not to system services." from https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/upstart/+bug/938669 Sources: ...


4

From the man page: open() returns a file descriptor, a small, nonnegative integer. and then: open() and creat() return the new file descriptor, or -1 if an error occurred


4

fclose() is function related with file streams. When you open file with the help of fopen() and assign stream to FILE *ptr. Then you will use fclose() to close the opened file. close() is a function related with file descriptors. When you open file with the help of open() and assign descriptor to int fd. Then you will use close() to close the opened file. ...


4

if(fd = -1) That's an assignment and always yields a value not equal to zero, therefore the body of the if is always entered.


4

Eventually is garbaged collected. It is not a good practice to do this, because you may need to flush the contents of a file to be actually written to disk. By letting the garbage collector do its job when it wants, you're not sure when or whether the file will be actually written.


4

File descriptors are always passed between a parent and child process When you fork a process, the file descriptors that are open in the parent(at the time of fork()) are implicitly passed on to the child. There is no need to send them explicitly. For example: The pseudo-code looks as follows: In process A: fd = open_socket_or_file; char str_fd[3]; ...


4

You could write the second statement as; int tmp; ... tmp = close(fd); if(tmp == -1) errExit("close"); But since tmp serves no purpose after the check in the if (and a good compiler will indeed optimise it away), it has the same effect if you write it as the original code. On the other hand, we can use assignments in if-statements, so: if ((fd = ...


4

If you are using bash as your shell, you can do the following: ./a.out 3< file1 4< file2


3

It's just a buffering issue. Try: cat foo.txt | ( head -1; tail -1) and you will (probably) see the same thing (head consumes the entire input). Probably what is happening is that head is behaving differently with a regular file than with a pipe, and the process substitution (which is the name for the <(cmd) syntax) is creating a pipe. (In Linux, ...


3

I think this is the problem: echo "START" \ | while read line; do ${SELFX} -one ${line}; done \ | while read line; do ${SELFX} -two ${line}; done The first while loop reads START from the echo statement. The second while loop processes the output of the first while loop. But since the script is redirecting stdout to a file, nothing is piped to the ...


3

There's a constructor marked "use an existing socket handle", which takes a socket_t. You can cast an int to socket_t (socket_t is an enum based on int on Unix systems). // it requires an address family but i don't think it matters much auto socket = new Socket(cast(socket_t) 0, AddressFamily.INET); That will get you constructed, though then using ...


3

if(fd = -1) should be if(fd == -1)


3

When bash is invoked as sh, it (mostly) restricts itself to features found in the POSIX standard. Process substitution is not one of those features, hence the error.


3

You want open(filename, "ab+") : The mode can be 'r', 'w' or 'a' for reading (default), writing or appending. The file will be created if it doesn't exist when opened for writing or appending; it will be truncated when opened for writing. Add a 'b' to the mode for binary files. Add a '+' to the mode to allow simultaneous reading and writing. ...


3

Because cat is a shell command, but open is a Python function. subprocess with shell=True invokes something like bash (and with shell=False, it does roughly what bash also does, but with less extra parsing) - so, basically, it can run any command you can run directly in a terminal without having to open another process (like the Python interpreter) first. ...


3

Your problem is that you are doing an opendir in the loop, but never doing a closedir. That will leak an fd on each iteration of the outer loop.


3

It is indeed a number and you get it by issuing the socket(2) system call. It is stored in the process's task_struct and you need it to send or receive data. More exactly, the kernel uses the file descriptor to locate File Objects stored in the files_struct struct inside the task_struct. It behaves like a bitmap where the number of the file descriptor ...


3

IMHO, you're mixing responsibilities. Let your RAII class deal with the opening and closing of the file descriptor. Let some other class deal with the lifetime question of your RAII class. As you have it now, the user of your file_descriptor class would need to know that it is using a shared_ptr internally. On first glance, if I were to share a ...


3

Yes. Open file descriptors are preserved across a call to exec. From the execve man page (all exec* calls are just a wrapper around this system call): By default, file descriptors remain open across an execve(). File descriptors that are marked close-on-exec are closed; see the description of FD_CLOEXEC in fcntl(2). Yes, a file descriptor is the way ...


3

The open command isn't part of bash - I think it's an OSX thing (maybe BSD?). The question isn't even really about open - it's about how Sublime and TextEdit handle files vs BBEdit. I was able to verify your results, and am led to believe that TextEdit (and apparently sublime, I don't have it) doesn't hold the file open while you're editing. I wrote a ...


3

04000 (with the leading zero) is an octal integer literal, and 2 (decimal) = 2 (octal) = O_RDWR 2050 (decimal) = 4002 (octal) = O_RDWR | O_NONBLOCK which means that setting the O_NONBLOCK flag just worked fine. For easier comparison with the O_XXX definitions you could print the flags as an octal number: printf("FD MODE 2 - %#o\n", ...


3

The child program knows nothing of Perl's variables. If you want to redirect a child's stdout, you'll need to redirect file descriptor 1. open(my $MERGED, "|-", "tee", "/tmp/my.log") or die $!; open(STDOUT, '>&', $MERGED) or die $!; open(STDERR, '>&', $MERGED) or die $!;


2

You'll need to use eval: fd=3 file=/path/to/file eval "exec $fd> $file"


2

If all descriptors have no data when select is called, it will block until at least one descriptor is ready for reading. Probably, descriptor 5 is the first one to be checked and select exits before other pipes have any data to read. You should also check the actual result of select since it contains number of bits it set.


2

The first argument to select() is the highest-numbered file descriptor plus 1: select(highest_fd+1, &fifo_set, NULL, NULL, NULL); Note: the fd set will contain the descriptors that are "ready" after select returns, you should set the fds again if you want to do another select()



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