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8

I think you are now trying to reinvent a key-value database. Maybe the easiest thing would be to check if sqlite3 module would offer you what you need. Using a readymade database is easier than rolling your own! Of course, sqlite3 is not a key-value DB (on the surface), so if you need something even simpler, have a look at LMDB and its Python bindings: ...


8

You must open the file for writing: out = file('testfile', 'w') ... When R opens (or does not open) connections automatically is a bit complicated, but it's explained in the help (?file). If you do not pass 'w', each write call opens and closes the file, and I guess this causes the strange behaviour you observe. If you want to open an existing file for ...


7

There's no easy way to do this with psftp. You would have to parse it's output to find files that were successfully downloaded. Though you can do this easily with WinSCP. Just use get -delete *.xml command. See http://winscp.net/eng/docs/scriptcommand_get Full WinSCP script would be: option batch abort option confirm off open domain.com ...


5

Right click on the file in eclipse an go to properties, you'll see that this is a different file. Actually you should not try to write/create a file in such a location. Your application may not always be unpacked from a .war archive, in which case ServletContext#getRealPath() will return null. An alternative would be to define a context init parameter in ...


4

fwrite is moving the position in the file to the end of the file. The fread then has nothing to read. Use fgetpos to save the file position before the fwrite, and fsetpos to set the position back after the fwrite.


4

The meaning of the flag "w+" (from http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/fopen/): write/update: Create an empty file and open it for update (both for input and output). If a file with the same name already exists its contents are discarded and the file is treated as a new empty file. When you open a file with "w+", you will need to write to it ...


4

OS-level CLISP provides stream-lock and with-stream-lock which interface to fcntl or LockFileEx. These will lock both open streams and files. You can use FFI to call those OS function in other CL implementations. A directory is merely a (special) file, so fcntl should be able to lock it (one has to think carefully about what it means to "write to a ...


4

This is a typical symptom of not closing the stream. Wrap your resource usages in a using statement, like always. Flushing does not do what you think it does. It does not make data visible to other programs. It forces it do disk. This is not your problem. It doesn't matter what's on disk. What matters is what the Windows File Cache presents to other ...


4

br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("H:\\infilename.txtt")); Typing error mainly; you spelled the name of the file wrong. You should instead write: br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("H:\\infilename.txt"));


4

In ifstream infile3("MyFile.dat"); if (!infile3.fail()) { cout << endl << "The file already exists!" << endl; return 0; } you exit (return 0) whenever testing for the successful opening of "MyFile.dat". In ofstream outfile4("MyFile.dat"); outfile4 << "Hi Foo" << endl; outfile4.close(); // this piece of code ...


3

Your char array is not null terminated, either create the array with space for one extra null character (and set it to '\0') buff = new char[size + 1]; buff[size] = '\0'; // Or simply buff = new char[size + 1]{}; or even better avoid using raw pointers wherever possible, especially for character arrays used as strings. while(!file.eof()) is an ...


3

From the MSDN documentation of File.AppendAllText: Opens a file, appends the specified string to the file, and then closes the file. If the file does not exist, this method creates a file, writes the specified string to the file, then closes the file. Simply: File.AppendAllText(@"YourPathHere", "My awesome appended string!");


3

As noted in my comment above, there is a section in the documention ?read.csv entitled "Memory Usage" that warns that anything based on read.table may use a "surprising" amount of memory and recommends two things: Specify the type of each column using the colClasses argument, and Specifying nrows, even as a "mild overestimate".


3

You are opening File.dat in your text editor as UTF-16LE when it quite clearly isn't, open it in plain ASCII or UTF-8 (or even use a hex editor) and you should see the strings. 潓敭敔瑸匀浯呥硥t corresponds to the UTF-16LE sequence 53 6F 6D 65 54 65 78 74 00 53 6F 6D 65 54 65 78 74 00 guess what this is when read as plain ASCII / UTF-8?


3

It's pretty trivial to do. All you have to do is to seek the intended position and then write something: #include <stdio.h> const unsigned int wanted_size = 1048576; int main(int argc, char **argv) { FILE *fp = fopen("test.dat", "w+"); if (fp) { // Now go to the intended end of the file // (subtract 1 since we're writing a ...


3

Use an array ? Also you can replace while with a for loop: var writers = new StreamWriter[18]; for(int i =0; i<18; i++) writers[i] = new StreamWriter(@"L:\BananaDB\DBFILE" + i + ".txt");


3

chshould be an int anyway The function fgetc() will always return an int, to handle all the char values and EOF which is negative. Here reading your file will prematurely end when finding character 0xFF. For the compiling issue, change getch() into getchar()


3

Just loop over the values then: with open('log.txt','w') as log: for value in log_disk.values(): log.write('{}\n'.format(value))


3

After num_lines = sum(1 for line in f) The file pointer in f is at the end of the file. Therefore any subsequent call of f.readlines() gives an empty list. The minimal fix is to use f.seek(0) to return to the start of the file. However, a better solution would be to read through the file only once, e.g. using enumerate to get the line and its index i: ...


3

In your original script you read the file once to scan the number of lines, then you (try to) read the lines in memory, you needlessly create a list for the full size instead of just extending it with list.append, you initialize the list with zeroes which does not make sense for a list containing strings, etc. Thus, this script does what your original idea ...


3

You've also got the itertools.islice approach available: from itertools import islice with open('input') as fin, open('output', 'w') as fout: fout.writelines(islice(fin, None, None, 2)) This saves the modulus operation and puts the line writing to system level.


3

JFileChooser c= new JFileChooser(); c.showOpenDialog(c); File write_file = c.getSelectedFile(); String Content = "input here the data to be written to your file"; try { FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(write_file); BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter(fw); bw.append(Content); bw.append("hiiiii"); bw.close(); fw.close(); } ...


3

Allegro CL provides a number of operating system specific locking mechanisms. Have a look at Appendix A.10 OSI file locking functions. In particular, the Windows-specific solution looks like it's locking, but that lock-stream and unlock-stream, described on the same page, are the platform agnostic versions that would make for more portable code. These do ...


3

One thing which would help a lot is to actually check the return status of fread(). The inner function does that and returns -1 for error, but the call in main() to that does not check the status. In many implementations, feof() does not become true until an attempt to read past the end of file.


3

It looks like the error that you get is actually a compile-time error, not a runtime error. The contructor PrintWriter(File) declares a checked FileNotFoundException in its signature, therefore you either need to surround its invocation with try ... catch block, or to declare that exception in throws declaration of your method to catch it later. See also: ...


3

ImageIO.read(); takes InputStream as parameter so there is no meaning of casting it to ImageInputStream. Secondly you can not cast InputStreamReader Object to ImageInputStream because ImageInputStream has nothing to do with InputStreamReader which you thought of. Moreover getResourceAsStream() returns InputStream.So you can directly do it like this. ...


3

The ImageIO class has a utility method to read an InputStream and create a BufferedImage. There is also a utility method to create an ImageInputStream from an InputStream.


3

Following lines in the except block overwrites f causing open file to be closed. with open("log_readFile.txt","a") as f: f.write(str(e)) f.write("\n") Change the name f for the file for appending to another name will solve the problem: with open("log_readFile.txt", "a") as logf: logf.write(str(e)) logf.write("\n")


3

When you use && you are combining separate commands, each of which can have its own redirections. If you want a redirection to apply to a series of commands you can group them with curly brackets. { date && sensors -A -f | awk '{print $2}' && awk '{print $1;}' /proc/loadavg; } >> ~/bunny or { date sensors -A -f | ...


3

You cannot use getResourceAsStream on locations that are not within the JVM classpath. The following snippet works because somewhere within your JVM classpath the file_name exists. getClass().getResourceAsStream(file_name); What you are attempting to do here in the next snippet is to use the current class's classloader to load a file that may or may not ...



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