New answers tagged

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Using rnm: rnm -rs '/^fgh/jkl/' fgh* More examples here.


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File name may be unacceptable or you live a permission problem. Try this : #include <string.h> #include <errno.h> void my_create(char* path) { FILE* fp; fp = fopen(path, "rb+"); if (fp == NULL) { /* File doesn't exist*/ printf ("File does not exist : %s", path) fp = fopen(path, "wb+"); if (fp == NULL) { ...


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You could also use numpy. When your data is stored in a numpy.ndarray: import numpy as np from random import sample l = 100 #length of data f = 50 #number of elements you need indices = sample(range(l),f) train_data = data[indices] test_data = np.delete(data,indices)


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The phenomenon you are experiencing is a difference in end-of-line characters between UN*X systems and Microsoft Windows systems. These systems prefer to use different sequences of characters to signal a end of line. UN*X systems use the LF (line feed) character (\n, 0x0A in ASCII) Windows systems use a CR (carriage return) and a LF (line feed) character ...


2

Line endings are different on Windows than on other platforms. You're always writing "\n" which is the Unix line ending. While you could simply hard-code it to the Windows line ending ("\r\n"), if you want your code to work everywhere, you should use the platform line separator. One way is to get it is from the system properties: fw.write(array[i] + ...


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Found amazing ready code here Hope this helps!!!


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In line 167 you are calling your encrypt function with label = []byte(product). In line 120 you are calling your decrypt function with a label variable that has been defined but not initialized (i.e. you are sending an empty byte array) decrypted = decrypt_oaep(private_key, encrypted, label) Because of that, your decryption won't work. From the docs: ...


2

The problem lies in ImageIO.write(image, type, bos);. In your case type is "String", but that is most likely not a valid format. To see all the formats at your disposal execute ImageIO.getReaderFormatNames(). If you can use Apache Commons, I suggest you try the following to encode your file to Base64: (fileImage is of type File): byte[] imageBytes = ...


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Thanks to Max Maier, swift version: func clearTmpDirectory() { do { let tmpDirectory = try NSFileManager.defaultManager().contentsOfDirectoryAtPath(NSTemporaryDirectory()) try tmpDirectory.forEach { file in let path = String.init(format: "%@%@", NSTemporaryDirectory(), file) try ...


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Your problem description says that you want to find the event with highest number of participants. I tried a solution which does not use list or dictionary. Ps: I am new to Python. bigEventName = "" participants = 0 curEventName = "" curEventParticipants = 0 # Use RegEx to split the file by lines itr = re.finditer("^([#\w+].*)$", lines, flags = ...


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You can do it without a dictionary and maybe make it a little simpler if just using lists: with open('myfile.txt', 'r') as f: lines = f.readlines() lines = [l.strip() for l in lines if l[0] != '#'] # remove comment lines and '\n' highest = 0 event = "" for l in lines: l = l.split() if int(l[0]) > highest: ...


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Similar answers to the ones above. result = {} # store the results current_key = None # placeholder to hold the current_key for line in lines: # find what event we are currently stripping data for # if this line doesnt start with '#', we can assume that its going to be info for the last seen event if line.startswith("#"): ...


2

import sys from collections import defaultdict from operator import itemgetter def load_data(file_name): events = defaultdict(int) current_event = None for line in open(file_name): if line.startswith('#'): current_event = line[1:].strip() else: participants_count = int(line.split()[0]) ...


0

Here's how I would do it. with open("test.txt", "r") as f: docText = f.read() eventsList = [] #start at one because we don't want what's before the first # for item in docText.split("#")[1:]: individualLines = item.split("\n") #get the sum by finding everything after the name, name is the first line here sumPeople = 0 #we don't want ...


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I know this is an old thread, but I don't think you should be messing around with the registry like that. Especially not since ClickOnce and other deployment wizards have implemented a built-in capability to make a file-association. You can find this in Solution Explorer -> Project Properties -> Publish tab -> Options button -> File-associations tab. Here ...


2

You cannot read on a file, if you open it for writing only: fd = open(token[1], O_WRONLY); //open You need to open it for reading, O_RDONLY in your case, if you do not want to write anything to it (else O_RDWR). By the way - Your buffer sizes are odd (257), normally, one allocates buffers in powers of two (256). UPDATE: Be warned that read does not ...


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The directory you were specifying didnt exist on server. So the exception happens. You could write file on server as follows: File Writer: public void printData(Bean bean, ServletContext context) { try { //if you want to create file outside web-inf directory. //String path = context.getRealPath("/"); //if you want to ...


1

I am missing points to post a comment, so using answer. You have to: The program should take all input (e.g., roster size, number of programming assignments, number of test, and the information for each of the student) from a file. Which means: there is no point of asking on a command line for number of students, tests. You start with creating some ...


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From Boost documentation int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { path p (argv[1]); // p reads clearer than argv[1] in the following code if (exists(p)) // does p actually exist? { if (is_regular_file(p)) // is p a regular file? cout << p << " size is " << file_size(p) << '\n'; else if (is_directory(p)) ...


1

I cannot understand why do you use loop while(iss>>xCoord >> yCoord) if you wrote "The contents are always the same format, so string, then int, then int". For your format you can simplify your read procedure: while(infile >> cityName >> xCoor >> yCoor ) { addCity(new City(cityName, xCoor, yCoor)); }


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please check the link, where present issue: issue for access to external memory in previous android versions there is no problem. current possess improvements


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Android API < 23 Your Android Manifest must declare the specific user permission: <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE"/> You also have to declare the reading permission if you also intend to read files: <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.READ_EXTERNAL_STORAGE"/> User permissions must ...


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As you can see in your screenshot, the CanTimeout property is false. So these properties are supposed to throw an exception; from the msdn page of Stream: Notes to Inheritors: The ReadTimeout property should be overridden to provide the appropriate behavior for the stream. If the stream does not support timing out, this property should raise an ...


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You could do it like this: with open('4026.txt','r') as out1, open('4089.txt', 'r') as out2: x_col9 = [data1.strip().split()[9] for data1 in out1.readlines()] y_col9 = [data2.strip().split()[9] for data2 in out2.readlines()] if len(x_col9) != len(y_col9): print('Error: files do not have same number of rows') else: f = ...


1

What's happening is that the code you have is capturing the last value in the for loop and dividing that. You should conduct the division at each stage of the for-loop to get the correct divisions. An easier approach is placing all the values in a list e.g. x = [0.0149,0.01218,..etc] and y = [...] Then you divide the two lists using numpy (or a for-loop ...


0

Replacing with regular expression: re.sub('2016(0\d|1[0-2])([0-2]\d|3[0-1])',mydate, fileasstring) It has a shortcoming that it considers up to 31 days for any month valid.


0

You are probably getting whitespaces and new lines mixed with your values, hence the duplicates. Try parsing with uniVocity-parsers CsvParser as it eliminates these for you, works faster, and gives you much better support for handling the CSV format in general. Try this to eliminate your dupes: CsvParserSettings settings = new CsvParserSettings(); ...


1

You can iterate through all the entries and sanitize the filenames before extracting them by using this snippet that I wrote here: ZipFile.ExtractToDirectory "Illegal characters in path"


0

An elegant solution to remove duplicates (without keeping the order) is Set<String> hs = new HashSet<>(); //assume the ArrayList temp contains your data with duplicates hs.addAll(temp); temp.clear(); temp.addAll(hs); temp then contains your data without duplicates.


1

That’s impossible. The workaround — implement your own FileStream class using unmanaged interop. That’s relatively simple, mine is under 4 pages of code. Here’s the imports you'll need for that: static class NativeMethods { const string file121 = "api-ms-win-core-file-l1-2-1.dll"; const string handle110 = "api-ms-win-core-handle-l1-1-0.dll"; ...


0

var fs = require('fs'); function readfile(name,online,onend,encoding) { var bufsize = 1024; var buffer = new Buffer(bufsize); var bufread = 0; var fd = fs.openSync(name,'r'); var position = 0; var eof = false; var data = ""; var lines = 0; encoding = encoding || "utf8"; function readbuf() { bufread = ...


0

try this : if(file_exists(FCPATH . 'uploads/pages/' . $image)){ unlink(FCPATH . 'uploads/pages/' . $image); }


1

When you use the statement from <modulename> import <names> It doesn't bind the module name, it just binds the individual names that you imported as local names. So you should just call fileinput(), not fileinput.fileinput(). If you want to bind the module name, you should use import fileinput See `from ... import` vs `import .`


0

I suppose this should be like original[i].split("\t")[0] or original[i].split("\t")[1] in this case you are taking first or second value and then do parsing.


0

AFAIK, .split splits a string into a string array. Your code is trying to assign a double to a string array, so that's the reason of your parse issue. To fix, I would reccomend splitting the string into an array using .split(), and then traversing that array to assign to the double.


0

if you look at the line with open(filename,**'r'**) as file: Here you are opening the file in readonly format, which means you can't write the file, try yourself writing the file, it'll throw exception saying that file only is opened for reading. Internally file object saves the mode you open, and whenever you call an operation it'll check the mode you ...


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Here is the simplest way to check if a file exist: if(is_file($filename){ return true; //the file exist }else{ return false; //the file does not exist }


0

I tried to use the methods provided by the JTextArea class to answer this question. Hope this helps someone since I couldn't find the answer when I googled it. All that you need to do now is implement the method processLine(String lineStr) int lines = textArea.getLineCount(); try{// Traverse the text in the JTextArea line by line ...


0

I happened to have the same issue. I opened a .csv file using textscan and it added 1 whitespace on both side of any character and I also noticed that when opening the variable storing the read data, the font was different than the usual in Matlab. We managed to solve this issue by opening the '.csv' file into Notepad++ and changed the encoding to UTF-8. It ...


0

Now both these methods fail at times when the log file is empty (has no content), yet the file size is not zero (2 bytes). Actually, I think you will find that the file is NOT empty. Rather I think that you will find that those two characters are a CR and a NL; i.e. the file consists of one line that is empty. If you want to test if a file is either ...


0

There are a few problems here. First of all you are using fileScan.next(); to try and get the length of a file. This is going to give you 2 times the length because you are counting each token fileScan.next() grabs which will be first the number and then the letter. Length of lines is 144 but when you calculate it, it returns 288. So use ...


0

Instead of using int length = fileLength(fileName); to find the length, use int length = fileName.length();


0

ncurses needs a terminal because it initializes the I/O connection. A FIFO would not be suitable, since it is one-way and (see for example Perform action if input is redirected) probably cannot be initialized as a terminal. ncurses uses the TERM environment variable to lookup the terminal description (the actual terminal is not consulted on the matter). ...


0

Use HDF5 file format The problem is, you have to write a lot of data. HDF5 is format being very efficient in size and allowing access to it by various tools. Be prepared for few challenges: there are multiple python packages for HDF5, you will have to find the one which fits your needs installation is not always very simple (but there might be Windows ...


1

Below is a (non-complete) structure for how you could go about this: #include <fstream> #include <iostream> #include <string> int main(void) { const char* in_file_path = "foo.txt"; std::ifstream in_file(in_file_path); std::string buffer = ""; while (std::getline(in_file, buffer)) { //parse input using `#` as ...


2

curses uses a terminal for its input and output, so if you want to intercept that and make it go somewhere other than a terminal, the easiest method (though non-trivial) is to use a psuedoterminal. You do that by calling posix_openpt which gives you a pseudoterminal master device. You then call grantpt, unlockpt, and ptsname to get the name of a terminal ...


0

Multithreading could speed it up (have printers on other threads that you write to in memory that have a queue). Maybe a system design standpoint, but maybe evaluate whether or not you need to write everything to the file. Perhaps consider creating various levels of logging so that a release mode could run faster (if that makes sense in your context).


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If you are indeed I/O bound by the time it takes to write the file, multi-threading with a pool of threads may help. Of course, there is a limit to that, but at least, it would allow you to issue non-blocking file writes.


1

curses requires direct access to the terminal in order lookup escape codes, detect resolution etc. You should probably try to have one thread dedicated for curses output in the current (main) terminal, and redirect all debug messages from other threads to either a logfile/pipe/logging facility (and present them inside the curses if you want to)



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