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51

if you have that many lines, are you sure you want exactly 1% or a statistical estimate would be enough? In that second case, just randomize at 1% at each line... awk 'BEGIN {srand()} !/^$/ { if (rand() <= .01) print $0}' If you'd like the header line plus a random sample of lines after, use: awk 'BEGIN {srand()} !/^$/ { if (rand() <= .01 || ...


26

You used awk, but I don't know if it's required. If it's not, here's a trivial way to do w/ perl (and without loading the entire file into memory): cat your_file.txt | perl -n -e 'print if (rand() < .01)' (simpler form, from comments): perl -ne 'print if (rand() < .01)' your_file.txt


25

You are probably looking for --colsep. generate_file_pairs | parallel --colsep ' ' ./prog {1} {2} Read man parallel for more. And watch the intro video if you have not already done so http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpaiGYxkSuQ


11

I wrote this exact code in Gawk -- you're in luck. It's long partially because it preserves input order. There are probably performance enhancements that can be made. This algorithm is correct without knowing the input size in advance. I posted a rosetta stone here about it. (I didn't post this version because it does unnecessary comparisons.) Original ...


10

This should work on most any GNU/Linux machine. $ shuf -n $(( $(wc -l < $file) / 100)) $file I'd be surprised if memory management was done inappropriately by the GNU shuf command.


10

you want a FileLock: FileChannel channel = new RandomAccessFile("C:\\foo", "rw").getChannel(); // Try acquiring the lock without blocking. This method returns // null or throws an exception if the file is already locked. FileLock lock = channel.tryLock(); // ... // release it lock.release(); for simplicity's sake I've omitted an enclosng try/finally ...


9

You can use FUSE to implement an intermediate Linux file system that sits on top of your real file system (the backend file system) and that performs any validation you need on the data before finally writing it to the backend. Then, you serve that file system via NFS/Samba. Another possibility is to use the inotify API to be notified of the changes on some ...


8

Think I would just create a new mysql/sqlite/whatever DB and insert the rows. Should be ~20 lines of perl. This, of course, requires easy access to a DB.. Guess you could also sort the files by the interesting fields and then for each line in file1 find and print the matching lines in file2.


7

Use break instead of continue! continue returns to the head of the loop, only skipping the current iteration, while break leaves the loop for good. On an unrelated note, your code has a bug that causes it to hang up if the file cannot be read for any reason (e.g. the user deletes it while your program tries to access it, the user removes the USB stick the ...


7

You can use the getArgs function to read arguments on the command line. For example: import System.Environment (getArgs) main = do args <- getArgs case args of [arg] -> putStrLn $ "You gave me one arg: " ++ arg _ -> putStrLn $ "You gave me " ++ show (length args) ++ " arguments." You can use the readFile function to read a ...


7

This memory usage is expected. Data.Map.Map consumes about 6N words of memory + size of keys & values (data taken from this excellent post by Johan Tibell). A lazy Text value takes up 7 words + 2*N bytes (rounded to the multiple of the machine word size), and a Word16 takes up two words (header + payload). We will assume a 64-bit machine, so the word ...


6

with open('path/to/input') as infile: words = [] for line in infile: words.append(line.strip()[::-1]) with open('path/to/output', 'w') as outfile: for word in words[::-1]: outfile.write(word) outfile.write('\n') One liners (since we all love them): with open('path/to/input') as infile: words = [line.strip()[::-1] for line in infile] ...


6

Start with this page comparing NumPy and Matlab. Here are some examples regarding your post: In [5]: import scipy In [6]: X = scipy.randn(3,3) In [7]: X Out[7]: array([[-1.16525755, 0.04875437, -0.91006082], [ 0.00703527, 0.21585977, 0.75102583], [ 1.12739755, 1.12907917, -2.02611163]]) In [8]: X>0 Out[8]: array([[False, True, ...


6

Change: f = open(filename,'r') To: f = open(os.path.join('testfilefolder',filename),'r') Which is effectively what you are doing in: f = open("testfilefolder/file2.txt",'r') Reason: you are listing the files in 'testfilefolder' (a subdirectory of your current directory) but then trying to open the file in your current directory.


6

Your fread call reads up to 10 bytes correctly, but printf with %s requires string to be null terminated. You can fix it by increasing size of the buffer to be 11 bytes and after every call to fread write zero at the end of data, i.e. buffer[br] = 0;. The other way to go is to tell printf what is the size of your data by calling printf("%.*s", br, buffer);. ...


5

Here's one way to do that using sed: sed -n '/^Acknowledgements:$/,$p' input-file > output-file The -n option suppresses the printing of the input to the output. The /^Acknowledgements:$/,$ part is an address range specification that says to match from the line that matches the regular expression ^Acknowledgements:$ through the end of the file ($), ...


5

Using a RandomAccessFile to seek, then read your bytes out. File file = new File("DemoRandomAccessFile.out"); RandomAccessFile raf = new RandomAccessFile(file, "r"); // Seek to the end of file raf.seek(file.length() - n); // Read it out. raf.read(yourbyteArray, 0, n);


5

I don't know awk, but there is a great technique for solving a more general version of the problem you've described, and in the general case it is quite a lot faster than the for line in file return line if rand < 0.01 approach, so it might be useful if you intend to do tasks like the above many (thousands, millions) of times. It is known as reservoir ...


5

The function go' builds a [T.Text] with three elements. The list is built lazily: in each step of go each of the three lists becomes known to a certain extent. However, you consume this structure by printing each element to a file in order, using the line: zipWithM_ TI.hPutStr hs txts So the way you consume the data does not match the way you produce the ...


5

For echoing a single line of a file, I quite like sed: $ IFS=: read name date number age < <(sed -n 2p data) $ echo $name Jim $ echo $date 02DEC99 $ echo $number 2 $ echo $age 3 $ This uses process substitution to get the output of sed to the read command. The sed command uses the -n option so it does not print each line (as it does by default); ...


5

to acces a file on a network location \\NETWORKPLACE\SomeDocuments\Personal\mehow\ I have written a very simple file Processor for you :) note to all readers: if there is something you do not understand ie. VBE, class, module, Sub, etc, please google it! I will not be answering questions in the comments. ...File Processor What does it do: ...


4

The ^A character you mention is the "start of heading" character. You can set the special Perl variable $/ to this character. Although, if you want your code to be readable and editable by the guy who comes after you (and uses another editor), I would do something like this: use English; local $INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR = "\cA" # 'start of heading' character ...


4

Here's a nice one-pass algorithm that I just came up with, having O(N) time complexity and O(M) space complexity, for reading M lines from an N-line file. Assume M <= N. Let S be the set of chosen lines. Initialize S to the first M lines of the file. If the ordering of the final result is important, shuffle S now. Read in the next line l. So far, we ...


4

WSO2 provides capability to listen to the files in the file system. However, as per your query it seems you need to process a binary file with your proprietary format. If so, you may use WSO2 ESB vfs transport[1] and you have to implement a custom message formatter and a builder (trivial java code as described on [2]) [1] ...


3

Actually your code is reading all data from file and keep into TextReader(in memory). Then you read data from TextReader to Save server. If data is so big, data size in TextReader caused out of memory. Please try this way. 1) Read data (each line) from File. 2) Then insert each line to Server. Out of memory problem will be solved because only each record ...


3

Probably not the answer you're looking for but this is what BULK INSERT was designed for.


3

You may want to take a look at NumPy / SciPy, they may help you do what you want. Plus there are a sizable number of users which will make it easier to get help when needed. General Intro to both libraries here


3

The problem is that <LANGUAGE> is parsed by the browser, considered an invalid HTML tag and ignored. Right-click view source in the browser to view the real output.


3

Those parameters change anually Yes, do cache them in memory. Especially if they are large or complex. You should take care to invalidate them at the right time once a year, depending how accurate that has to be. Simply caching them for an hour or even for a few minutes might be a good compromise.


3

If you're running it in debug mode on your own machine, the request timeout is disabled. If non-debug then it is enabled (and defaults to 110 seconds). See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e1f13641.aspx That said, having a web service do lengthy processing is generally not a good thing for scalability. Keep web [service] requests short and move long ...



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