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0

You are returning a pointer to a local variable - by the time getFileName() returns, buff is destroyed and the value of p points to memory that is no longer usable. If you really want to do this, you must make buff a static variable: char *getFileName(void) { static char buff[] = "index.html"; char *p; p = buff; printf ("name of the file: ...


2

Taking suggestions from commenters above, this reallocates memory whenever there is not enough, or apparently just enough. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> void fatal(char *msg) { printf("%s\n", msg); exit (1); } int main() { FILE* f1 = NULL; char *word = NULL; size_t size = 2; long ...


0

Which platform are you on? If you're using a POSIX-ish platform, then consider using getline() to read lines of unbounded size, then one of strcspn(), strpbrk(), strtok_r(), or (if you are really determined to make your code not reusable) strtok() to get the boundaries of the words, and finally use strdup() to create copies of the words. The pointers ...


2

In this case, nothing will happen and code execution time is very less. However, if your codes runs for long time when you are continuously opening files and not closing, after a certain time, there may be crash in run time. when you open a file, the operating system creates an entry to represent that file and store the information about that opened file. ...


2

To fortify juanchopanza's answer with some reference from the std::fstream documentation (destructor) [virtual](implicitly declared) destructs the basic_fstream and the associated buffer, closes the file (virtual public member function)


12

There is no difference. The file stream's destructor will close the file. You can also rely on the constructor to open the file instead of calling open(). Your code can be reduced to this: #include <fstream> int main() { std::ofstream myfile("example.txt"); myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n"; }


0

It may be that the files you try and list do not show because they are marked as hidden. In order to verify that, try this: final Path path = Paths.get("path/to/desktop.ini"); System.out.println(Files.getAttribute(path, "dos:hidden")); Also, try and use this to see whether those files show up: final Path dir = Paths.get("path/to/desktop/folder"); for ...


0

I also don't know. Do you already solved your problem?


0

The problem is that the WriteAllText Method don't write the encoded Text in UTF-8 in the File. You should add the Encoding: System.IO.File.WriteAllText(fileName, pageHtml, Encoding.UTF8);


0

The default receive size for a socket is 8,192 bytes (for reference). So from your code it looks like on the server, you're only reading the first 8,192 bytes of the message. You can either increase that buffer size to match the size of the 10MB clientData buffer you allocate, for example, some where after .Accept() and before Receive().. ...


0

Check this blog article: http://wicketinaction.com/2011/07/wicket-1-5-mounting-resources/. It explains how to do it with a mounted resource reference.


0

I would try and make this as easy as possible for you. You Microsoft's Reactive Framework for this. Just NuGet "Rx-Main". Here's what you can then do: finfo.GetFiles("*.txt").ToObservable() _ .Zip(Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1.0)), Function(f, _) f.Name) _ .ObserveOn(TextBox1) _ .Subscribe(Function(n) textbox_text += n + ...


0

In Linux you can do it with the following code #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include <unistd.h> ... /* check if directory exist */ struct stat status = { 0 }; if( stat("test", &status) == -1 ) { /* create it */ mkdir( "test", 0700 ); } /* open file */ FILE *fd2 = fopen("test/test", "w+"); ... For the situation ...


0

Here is the complete Class. In the below file "somelocation" refers to the actual path of the file. import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.BufferedWriter; import java.io.File; import java.io.FileReader; import java.io.FileWriter; import java.io.IOException; public class FileProcess { public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException ...


1

You should define upload_to option to your ImageField: class FileStorage(models.Model): image = models.ImageField(upload_to="media/", null=True, blank=True)


2

The name of the file may vary; that does not mean you need to change the name of the variable that holds the name of the file. import os, datetime, copy lastPart = datetime.datetime.now().strftime('%m/%d/%Y/%s') logName = 'log' + lastPart + '.txt' log_file = open(logName, "a") # in append mode log_file.write("this is a test\n")


0

Based on our discussion in comments it looks like you set your arguments as C:\Users\Zac Gadzinski\Documents\NetBeansProjects\Bmi\src\bmidata.txt but java YourClass ... command treats text separated with spaces as separate arguments so for something like java YourClass foo bar foo and bar will represent two different arguments. If you want to make ...


0

with open("myfile.txt") as f: lines = f.readlines() first_row = lines[0] print first_row last_row = lines[-1] print last_row


0

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundExceptions:0 at bmi.Bmi.main This message means that element 0 was accessed, going beyond the bounds of the array, in other words the array is empty so this doesn't work. This must be the problematic line in your pasted code: File file = new File (args [0]); If args is empty, that will raise ...


0

You can use StringIO to accumulate what you receive from server and check the size within an infinite while loop. import os import cStringIO as StringIO from multiprocessing import Process, Lock buffer = None CHUNK_SIZE = 1024 BUFFER_SIZE = 100 * 1024 * 1024 lock = Lock() while 1: if not buffer or buffer.closed: buffer = StringIO.StringIO() ...


2

According to the socket module documentation, connection.recv() returns a string. I would suggest adding these strings to a list, and writing out that list becomes very simple: data_list = [] buffer_size = 0 total_size = 0 # assuming file_size, chunk_size and out_file are already defined while total_size < file_size: file_data = ...


1

You don't want a loop. You want lapply. file_list <- list.files("/Users/iarwain/Data", pattern=".csv", full.names=T) combined_files <- do.call("rbind", lapply(files, read.csv)) Translation: apply the function read.csv over each item in the list file_list. The output is a list. Call the function rbind on all of the output, and assign it to ...


0

Using the 'w' write option with open automatically looks for the specified file, and deletes its contents if it already exists (which you can read about here) or creates it if it doesn't. Use 'a' instead to add / append to the file.


0

You need to open your file with append mode : f = open("PiggyBanks_Records.txt", "a")


0

dirname(FILE) = "../" dirname(dirname(FILE)) = "../../" dirname(dirname(dirname(FILE))) = "../../../" U can try its.


0

If you have .sql files, then most likely they are SQL dumps; that is: sequences of SQL instructions meant to populate a database. If you want to use databases, you must first learn SQL and at least one RDBMS (like MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite...): Get your hands on an SQL tutorial Learn how to use an RDBMS (how to create databases and tables, how to populate ...


0

The way to see if the file exists is to try to open it, and catch the FileNotFoundEzception that occurs if it isn't there. If it's there, read the list; if it isn't, create a new one.


-1

When working with relational data, you normally need an understanding of SQL (Structured Query Language). A good place to start would be: http://www.w3schools.com/sql/ If a file has the extension .sql, it is likely to be relational. A .txt file could contain any number of different types of code and format. My recommendation would be to learn SQL as a ...


-1

Please elaborate does 'Alcohol' implement serializable? how are you adding more items to the arraylist, if possible please put up some more code? are you able to retrieve your items from list upon deserialization?


0

The below code works great with .doc files. But doesn't work with .txt file. It doesn't throw any exception for .txt Still searching for solution that works with .txt files. I am opening files through Window Explorer, not via any code. public static void Main() { String file; file = "C:\\Temp\\test.doc"; bool b=IsCloseFile(file); ...


1

You can do this just by means of bash parameter extension, as mentioned in the bash manual: ${parameter%%word} Remove matching suffix pattern. The word is expanded to produce a pattern just as in pathname expansion. If the pattern matches a trailing portion of the expanded value of parameter, then the ...


1

Here is a simple bash script. This script assumes that the file name only contains one "." character and splits based on that. #!/bin/sh for f in *.cpp; do #This line splits the file name on the delimiter "." baseName=`echo $f | cut -d "." -f 1` newExtension=".new" cp $f $baseName$newExtension done


0

I think your issue is relating to the line $file="<sourcefile?>" as this doesn't appear (at least to me) to make sense. However, you will get a better idea of your issues if you make sure that PHP has error logging turned on and then look up your PHP error log file. something like (At the top of your PHP page): Sorry this code is older: ...


0

http://www.pixelbeat.org/programs/crudini should work on all platforms and can be used to read and update the ini file in a robust and simple way. crudini --set prolasso.ini '' UpdateSpeedCore 8 Putting it in a loop: :loop crudini --set prolasso.ini '' UpdateSpeedCore 8 ping localhost -n 121 > nul goto loop


0

You need to use to have one thread that feeds the files to be processed to a queue and a thread pool that dequeues from the queue and write the files. One way to do that is to use a simple producer consumer. Here is an example Multithreaded producer consumer in java


2

read file line by line including empty lines -> http://www.dostips.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=9611 -OR- processing text file: for /f "useback tokens=* delims=" %%# in ("c:\text.file") do ( set "current_line=%%#" ) more info here: http://ss64.com/nt/for_f.html


0

Maybe someone will be interesting - i solved this problem. I wrote a simple WCF service which runs on the same computer. So i can send log messages to this server through localhost and the service writes the logs to the file. The best part, that it doesn't require an internet connection. ;)


0

You should use : lineBuffer = (char *)malloc(sizeof(BUFFER_SIZE + 1)); than : char lineBuffer[BUFFER_SIZE]; Your stack will thanks you !


5

I have worked out a way you can benefit from multi-threading but for a minimum of changes of your code. import java.io.*; import java.util.concurrent.Executors; import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor; import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit; /** * Created by peter.lawrey on 30/01/15. */ public class ConcurrentFileWriter { private final ...


0

If you use FileFilter or FileNameFilter, you can get either a list of files for a later iteration or you can do something with every single file inside in the accept method. String path = "conf/files"; File [] files = new File(path).listFiles(new FileFilter() { @Override public boolean accept(File path) { if(path.isFile()) { ...


1

Following is the code to print calender for particular year import java.util.Calendar; import java.util.GregorianCalendar; import java.util.Locale; import java.util.Scanner; public class MyCalendar { /* * The main program asks users for year, * then it evaluates the weekday of the first day * of that month as well as the number of days ...


0

List<String> filenames = new LinkedList<String>(); public void listFilesForFolder(final File folder) { for (final File fileEntry : folder.listFiles()) { if (fileEntry.isDirectory()) { listFilesForFolder(fileEntry); } else { if(fileEntry.getName().contains(".csv")) ...


2

Rather than write out the data immediately, append the data as tuples to a list, then sort that list. Then write out the data. Reimplementing your reading loop to create that list: entries = [] with open ('class1.txt', 'r') as f: for line in f: row = line.split() if not row: continue name = row[0] max_score = ...


1

If you need to create a variable (job1, job2,job3,jobx) with each line you can use: @echo off setlocal enabledelayedexpansion for /f "tokens=2" %%a in (filename.conf) do ( set Job!$c!=%%a set /a $c+=1 ) echo Job1 = %job1% echo Job2 = %job2% echo Job3 = %Job3% If you don't need to set variables (directly run the calculation with each line) : @echo ...


2

Read a line via fgets() is a great first step. 2 methods: strtol() (better error handling) and sscanf() while((line = fgets(lineBuffer, BUFFER_SIZE, filePtr)) != NULL) { char *endptr; while (1) { errno = 0; long num = strtol(line, &endptr, 10); if (line == endptr) break; // no conversion // long and int may have different ranges ...


0

Just use a loop over the input line, exploiting that atol() stops at the next whitespace delimiter anyway. Works well for positive integers only ;) But it is fast, you need not read tons of strtok and sscanf documentation and it is even robust in the presence of "noise" littered between your integers. To make it work for negative ints, too, replace isdigit() ...


0

"How similar two files are", like using diff in bash?. If the anwser is yes, you can check java-diff-utils from google. Sample code: import difflib.*; public class BasicJenter code hereavaApp_Task1 { // Helper method for get the file content private static List<String> fileToLines(String filename) { List<String> ...


1

Use strtok() function with " "(space) as delimeter and place this in a loop that terminates when strtok() returns NULL to get each token then print each number from each token: while((line = fgets(lineBuffer, BUFFER_SIZE, filePtr)) != NULL) { printf("%s\n", lineBuffer); char *token=strtok(line," "); while(token!=NULL) { ...


3

Use strtol() which gives a pointer to the end of the match if there is one, and a char pointer to store the current position: while((line = fgets(lineBuffer, BUFFER_SIZE, filePtr)) != NULL) { printf("%s\n", lineBuffer); char* p = lineBuffer; while(p < lineBuffer+BUFFER_SIZE ) { char* end; long int value = strtol( p , ...


0

The bug was corrected in the 0.10.8 version of sails-mysql.



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