Hot answers tagged

98

You can use the Windows API functions, such as GetPrivateProfileString() and GetPrivateProfileInt().


96

If you need a cross-platform solution, try Boost's Program Options library.


20

I have never parsed ini files, so I can't be too specific on this issue. But i have one advice: Don't reinvent the wheel as long as an existing one meets your requirements http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/INI_file#Accessing_INI_files http://sdl-cfg.sourceforge.net/ http://sourceforge.net/projects/libini/ http://www.codeproject.com/KB/files/config-file-parser....


19

Just write your file parser, using whatever techniques come to mind Write lots of unit tests for it to make sure all your edge cases are covered Once you've done this, you will actually have a reasonable idea of the problem/solution. Right now you just have theories floating around in your head, most of which will turn out to be misguided. Step 3: ...


12

I considered it, but I'm not going to use XML. I am going to be writing this stuff by hand, and hand editing XML makes my brain hurt. :') Have you looked at YAML? You get the benefits of XML without all the pain and suffering. It's used extensively in the ruby community for things like config files, pre-prepared database data, etc here's an example ...


12

I use SimpleIni. It's cross-platform.


11

If you are already using Qt QSettings my_settings("filename.ini", QSettings::IniFormat); Then read a value my_settings.value("GroupName/ValueName", <<DEFAULT_VAL>>).toInt() There are a bunch of other converter that convert your INI values into both standard types and Qt types. See Qt documentation on QSettings for more information.


8

The fileparse is not a method; it is a function. This function is exported by default, so you actually want to do use File::Basename; my $fileName = fileparse($filePath); You have used is as a method call. Here File::Basename->fileparse($filePath) is equivalent to fileparse("File::Basename", $filePath) because in a method invocation, the invocant (...


7

this question is a bit old, but I will post my answer. I have tested various INI classes (you can see them on my website) and I also use simpleIni because I want to work with INI files on both windows and winCE. Window's GetPrivateProfileString() works only with the registry on winCE. It is very easy to read with simpleIni. Here is an example: #include "...


5

inih is a simple ini parser written in C, it comes with a C++ wrapper too. Example usage: #include "INIReader.h" INIReader reader("test.ini"); std::cout << "version=" << reader.GetInteger("protocol", "version", -1) << ", name=" << reader.Get("user", "name", "UNKNOWN") << ", active=" << ...


4

Have you tried libconfig; very JSON-like syntax. I prefer it over XML configuration files.


4

I fully agree with Orion Edwards, and it is usually the way I approach the problem; but lately I've been starting to see some patterns(!) to the madness. For more complex tasks I usually use something like an interpreter (or a strategy) that uses some builder (or factory) to create each part of the data. For streaming data, the entire parser would look ...


4

I was looking at almost this exact problem the other day: this article on string tokenizing is exactly what you need. You'll want to define your tokens as something like: @"(?&ltlevel>\s) | " + @"(?&ltterm>[^:\s]) | " + @"(?&ltseparator>:)" The article does a pretty good job of explaining it. From there you just start eating up tokens ...


4

You could read each line of the file sequentially. Each line is essentially a name value pair. Place each value in a map (hash table) keyed by name. Use a map for each section. When done parsing the file you'll have maps containing all the name value pairs. Iterate over each map and populate your database tables.


3

You can use os.path.relpath: os.path.relpath(Fullpath, TempPath) Or you can use split: Fullpath.split(TempPath)[1] Or you can use commonprefix with replace as: Fullpath.replace(os.path.commonprefix([Fullpath, TempPath]),'') Output: common\test.txt


3

Unless you plan on making the app cross-platform, using the Windows API calls would be the best way to go. Just ignore the note in the API documentation about being provided only for 16-bit app compatibility.


2

If you are interested in platform portability, you can also try Boost.PropertyTree. It supports ini as persistancy format, though the property tree my be 1 level deep only.


2

I would head to Python for any type of string parsing like this. I'm not sure how much of this information you want to retain, but I would perhaps use Python's split() function to split on = to get rid of the equals sign, then strip the whitespace out of the second piece of the pie. First, I would mask out the header/footer info I know I don't need, then ...


2

Windows has its own INI functions for C. But since you mentioned C++ try Feather INI. Program Options is another from Boost.


1

>>> data = [['Country', 'Destination', 'Country Code', 'Destination Code', 'Remarks'], ... ['AAA', 'Some Mobile', '111', '12, 23, 34, 46','Some remarks'], ... ['AAA', 'Some city A', '111', '55, 56, 57, 51', 'Some more remarks'], ... ['BBB', 'Some city B', '222', '234, 345, 456', 'Other remarks']] >>> >>> op=[data[0]] >>> ...


1

As noted in the comment, you can use winapi functions to do this. GetPrivateProfileSectionNames returns the names of the sections in the .ini file. Which you can then iterate and call GetPrivateProfileSection() to get the content of each section.


1

Using f As StreamReader = File.OpenText("sample.txt") Dim g As String = "undefined" Do Dim s As String = f.ReadLine If s Is Nothing Then Exit Do s = s.Replace(Chr(9), " ") If s.StartsWith("[") And s.EndsWith("]") Then g = s.Substring("[".Length, s.Length - "[]".Length) Else Dim ss() As ...


1

Maybe a late answer..But, worth knowing options..If you need a cross-platform solution , definitely you can try GLIB,, its interesting.. (https://developer.gnome.org/glib/stable/glib-Key-value-file-parser.html)


1

Just a side note, this statement has no effect: XML.ignoreWhitespace; because ignoreWhitespace is a property. You have to set it to true like this: XML.ingoreWhitespace = true;


1

The concerning thing to me is that it might be firing Event.COMPLETE before it's finished loading, and that makes me wonder whether or not the load is timing out. How often does the problem happen? Can you have success one moment, then failure the very next with the same feed? For testing purposes, try tracing the URLLoader.bytesLoaded and the URLLoader....


1

Have you tried checking that the bytes loaded are the same as the total bytes? URLLoader.bytesLoaded == URLLoader.bytesTotal That should tell you if the file has finished loading, it wont help with the compleate event firing to early, but it should tell you if its a problem with the xml been read. I am unsure if it will work over domains, as my xml is ...


1

There is another YAML library for .NET which is under development. Right now it supports reading YAML streams and has been tested on Windows and Mono. Write support is currently being implemented.


1

Using a library is almost always preferably to rolling your own. Here's a quick list of "Oh I'll never need that/I didn't think about that" points which will end up coming to bite you later down the line: Escaping characters. What if you want a : in the key or ] in the value? Escaping the escape character. Unicode Mix of tabs and spaces (see the problems ...


1

Use Lex and YACC. Unless you devote the next ten years exclusively to this subject, they will produce better and faster code every time.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible