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6

Your problem is probably this line: await writeStream.WriteAsync(buffer, 0, buffer.Length); It should be: await writeStream.WriteAsync(buffer, 0, bytesRead); Your code is writing the entire buffer...regardless of how many bytes were actually read. Instead, you should only write the number of bytes that were actually read.


3

You have code that reads from UploadedFile.InputStream (thus seeking it to the end) and then you try to pass that stream (with position set to the end and hence without anything to read from it) to some other method. As PutObject is not able to read anything from stream and sends empty data. Possible fix - set position to 0 (see Stream.Seek(0, ...


3

Use List.Capacity to manually increase the capacity, perhaps every 1000 lines or so. If you want to trade performance for memory, you can do this: instead of storing the positions of every line, store only the positions of every 100th (or something) line. Then when, say, line 253 is required, go to the position of line 200 and count forward 53 lines.


3

Main problem is here: byte[] bytes = bytesAsInts.Select(x => (byte)x).ToArray(); You are basically throwing away part of the result when converting the single integers to single bytes. If you look at the array after the call to encode(), you can see that some of the array elements have a value higher than 255, so they cannot be represented as bytes. ...


2

You are hiding your previous variable with the same name. int main(int argc, char * argv[]) { // default settings bool flag = false; string fileName = "defaultMap.txt"; ifstream *infile = new ifstream(fileName); // <-------------- HERE See? You defined it first a bit above and then, you don't use it inside the if statement because you ...


2

You are using the MemoryStream to create an byte array before the Document is closed. This results in an incomplete PDF. At the end of the using that creates the Document, the PDF is completed (e.g. the essential cross-reference table is written), but by then, you've already used the incomplete stream to write the PDF file. How to solve this? Don't use ...


2

The writes are being buffered in memory, try calling logFileStream.Flush(); at the end of each Log function. You really shouldn't be keeping the file handle open between calls though, if I were you I would open and close it in each function. If you're doing a lot of logging then buffer it yourself in memory and dump the whole thing once it reaches a certain ...


2

Here is a tested console app. Just create "Files" directory in your executable, put your files into it, and paste something like this http://localhost:8088/fileServer/a.pdf to your browser. using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.IO; using System.Linq; using System.Net; using System.ServiceModel; using System.ServiceModel.Channels; ...


1

there are 2 possible answers depending on what you want to do, if you want to write a class that can work with both types of stream then the simplest way is to base that class around the abstract stream class which is common to all streams if you want to copy data from one stream to another then you can use the CopyTo function however requires .Net4 or ...


1

My suggestion is to not use stopwatch but just go on the # of bytes. Maybe checking the stopwatch elapsed after every byte is taking a long time (seems unlikely though but who knows). Also, get fsIn.Length one time outside of the while loop. using (FileStream fsCrypt = new FileStream(cryptFile, FileMode.Create)) { using (CryptoStream cs = new ...


1

By default StreamWriter uses UTF-8 Encoding, so your test.xml will be in UTF-8. More details are here


1

You can read file parts and apply MD5.TransformBlock to each read part. (Notice, that last part should be read with MD5.TransformFinalBlock). Between processing each block you can check if cancellation is required, you are free to use any synchronization primitives you like. Here is example, that uses CancellationToken: using System; using System.IO; using ...


1

When you cast using as, it won't throw an exception, but fail silently, and return null. When you're using as, you're saying sometimes this could fail, and I'm prepared to handle that. Generally you'd do a null check: FileStream txtFileStream = UploadedFile.InputStream as FileStream if(txtFileStream != null) { using(txtFileStream) { ...


1

Following Eugene's advice I managed to make it work as intended, here's the code in case someone would like to see it: public class CaesarStream : Stream { private int _offset; private FileStream _stream; public CaesarStream(FileStream stream, int offset) { _offset = offset; _stream = stream; } public override int ...


1

This is the correct version of your example use autoflush = true in stream writer open/close stream in every request - if it is correctly implemented, autoflush is unnecessary (flush will be done after dispose StreamWriter) use FileMode.Append public class Logger { public enum LogLevel { Low, Medium, ...


1

We can also zip the directory something like the following : var spawn = require('child_process').spawn; var pathToArchive = './very_large_folder.tar.gz'; var pathToFolder = './very_large_folder'; var tar = spawn('tar', ['czf', pathToArchive, pathToFolder]); tar.on('exit', function (code) { if (code === 0) { console.log('completed ...


1

Let's look at this particular piece of code if (!flag) { ifstream *infile = new ifstream("defaultMap.txt"); } infile defined here has scope only with curly braces. If you try to use it beyond curly braces, it won't be visible. In your case, when you use infile after this section, you are actually using same-name variable declared at top. So ...



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