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One possibility would be to encrypt each file in the container separately. Encrypt the directory separately as well. When connected, just decrypt the directory file for the user to see. Other files are decrypted/encrypted as the user opens and saves them. Use a similar process for subdirectories if any are present. This is more complex to run than ...


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On linux: mount -o size=50m -t tmpfs none ./ramdisk will create a filesystem in ram, size 50M, mounted to ./ramdisk. Only root can do this. Non-root users can use it. It will show up in df and du. You can clean it by doing umount ./ramdisk. Creation, usage and removal are working just fine, maybe the root requirement is an obstacle.


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Normally in this case I think you ADD the folder to the Docker image, so that any container running it will have it in its (writeable) filesystem, but writes will go to a different layer. You need to write a Dockerfile in the folder above the one you wish to use, which should look something like this: FROM my/image ADD codebase /codebase Then you build ...


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According to the documentation for IRP_MJ_CREATE, the IoStatus->Information member will be set to one of: FILE_CREATED FILE_DOES_NOT_EXIST FILE_EXISTS FILE_OPENED FILE_OVERWRITTEN FILE_SUPERSEDED


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I can't comment because I don't have the required 50 reputation. Anyways, did you figure out a fix for this issue?


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I'm assuming you want to match unicode equivalent filenames, e.g. you expect an input pattern of u'\xE9*' to match both filenames u'\xE9qui' and u'e\u0301qui' on any operating system, i.e. character-level pattern matching. You have to understand that this is not the default on Linux, where bytes are taken as bytes, and where not every filename is a valid ...


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Maybe you could use a Makefile to help you. For instance make test might start by compiling your program, then create the files and folders required for testing, launching your program, and then cleaning the test folder if need be (at that time, you might also want to check if the state of the test folder is as expected).


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Similar to Windows, OSX or Linux formatting does not erase it just allows the data to be written over by other data that you put on the drive , so that the data is still there until you write over it. This means that what ever is formatted can be recovered with the right recovery software. See a full list of Android recover software in this post on the ...


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Apparently Yosemite assigns a DocumentIdentifier to a file only when it knows something is trying to track its identity (like Versions or iCloud). I don't see any way to talk to the kernel and tell it to start tracking files you're interested on. I hope this changes in future releases, since the API has been made public on OS X 10.10 and it's mostly useless ...


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only this second '-v' works in my command, That might be because both -v options attempt to mount host folders on the same container destination folder /code. -v /codebase/:/code:ro ^^^^^ -v /temp:/code:rw ^^^^^ You could mount those host folders in two separate folders within /code. As in: -v ...


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The only notice to Jasper Blues's answer is that for Yosemite > 10.10.2 there would be needed to replace the package fuse4x with another package: brew install Caskroom/cask/osxfuse All the rest is straightforward.


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According to the "official" spec, http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799//functions/rmdir.html , no. It clearly says "The directory shall be removed only if it is an empty directory., and further If the directory is not an empty directory, rmdir() shall fail and set errno to [EEXIST] or [ENOTEMPTY].. Anyway, I suspect such a filesystem ...


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@Cort3z: if the problem is still present, this hotfix: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2891362/it?wa=wsignin1.0 should solve it (from win7 sp1 to 8.1)


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Go to drive's properties and then security tab and change the ownership


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if os.path.isfile(path_to_file): try: open(path_to_file) pass except IOError as e: print "Unable to open file" Raising exceptions is considered to be an acceptable, and Pythonic, approach for flow control in your program. Consider handling missing files with IOErrors. In this situation, an IOError exception will be ...


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You can save it as a file on the NodeJS end, and then download the file using javascript. That is probably the best way, as javascript does not have access to writing to the file system.


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Here is my take: It is not advisable to store too many files in HDFS. Check this link: Namenode File No. Limit Search using MR is not efficient. Especially if you data is not partitioned or indexed. Your case would be best served by using a KeyValue store or a distributed search tool like Elastic Search (Given my limited understanding of your use case)


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You can check if your filesystem is mounted with the noatime or relatime option: greek0@orest:/home/greek0$ cat /proc/mounts /dev/md0 / ext3 rw,noatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered 0 0 ... These mount options are often used because they increase filesystem performance. Without them, every single read of a file turns into a write to the disk (for ...


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This is how I solve the problem: import unicodedata as U # ... globPattern = os.path.join(folder, prefix + u'*' + suffix) rawRegEx = prefix + u'([0-9]+)' + suffix + u'$' # Mac uses NFD normalization for Unicode filenames while windows # linux/windows use NFC normalization if sys.platform.startswith('darwin'): ...


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you can get decrease of performance and/or lose all app data, if you will use renaming. May be store some key information (record ID and fingerprint, for example) after each record, and seek last correct key information when application is starting is better way?


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Not really applicable for Ext3, but maybe useful for users of other filesystems: according to https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Btrfs#Defragmentation, with Btrfs it is apparently possible to defragment the metadata of a directory: btrfs filesystem defragment / will defragment the metadata of the root folder. This uses the online defragmentation support ...


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Simply you have to follow the following steps: Power off your machine. Right click on virtual machine name > Settings > Storage Click on Controller : SATA > Add Hard Disk. Choose the new hard disk drive type size and hit create. Discard the machine state. Insert Ubuntu Live CD. Boot from ubuntu live cd. Open "gparted" (It's installed, not need to ...


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You just need to initialize FileSystemWatcher and subscribe to relevant events. FileSystemWatcher watcher = new FileSystemWatcher(@"DirectoryPath"); watcher.Filter = "*.*";//Watch all the files watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true; //Specifies changes to watch for in a file or folder. watcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastWrite | NotifyFilters.Size; ...


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I ran into the same problem. Below is some example code to fix your filenames by iterating through the files in your documents directory and substituting out the filepath information while leaving the filenames. Before executing the last line to change the filenames, I would recommend using NSLog to make sure this is exactly what you want in your ...


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since you said a lot data come.. I prefer text file.. first you should have format for the log like filename format => example: server_{year}_{month} input format => example: {time} {ip} {status} {text} database is nice.. but try not put the log in same database with your main database.. remember.. play safe


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You cannot do that in a portable way. Even with JSR 203. A Path is two parts: a root (may be null); a list of name components. One problem you have is with the root. For Unix systems, for instance, if we take path /foo/bar, you have: root: /; name components: foo, bar. On Windows, c:\foo\bar has parts: root: c:; name components: foo, bar. Which ...


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Most of the time you won't have to do anything. Java deals with the various formats and when using File.getPath, it returns the path with your system's separator. If at some point you really need to know your OS's path separator, use File.separator or System.getProperty("path.separator"). For example, all of these print C:\JavaWork\Scala\Test\test.txt : ...


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The usual way to address this is to synchronize the clocks on all of the machines to a common time reference using ntp (usually to a reliable time server). The NTP FAQ and HOWTO is a good place to start. For most Linux servers, just installing the ntp package takes you halfway. You may need to customize the configuration file (usually /etc/ntp.conf), as ...


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This actually depends on the filesystem being used. This is probably referring to the stat.blksize filesystem attribute. From the stat(2) manual page: struct stat { /* ... */ blksize_t st_blksize; /* blocksize for filesystem I/O */ The -f option to the stat(1) appears to display this information, and on my Linux box, it ...


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This question is too broad, in my opinion, as it opens up a discussion whether one solution is better or another. It's actually your call to make, but you can create a structure in Relational database for it. It's as simple as it gets. CREATE TABLE mytable ( id serial PRIMARY KEY, id_parent int REFERENCES mytable(id) ); Postgres for example allows ...


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In code your task is handled with a filesystem filter driver. Process Monitor application (already mentioned in another answer) includes such driver in pre-built form. You can write a kernel-mode driver yourself, yet this would probably be an overkill. Then there exists our CallbackFilter - a class library with a pre-created kernel-mode driver included. ...


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For watching writes to the file, the FileSystemWatcher class is the right way to go. However if you want to know if a file is being written, what I would do is get a list of all the open files by process, and monitor when the file is opened and then closed. There is a CodeProject article that shows how to get the open files by process here.


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One solution would be to use a Microsoft tool called Process Monitor. It's able to list all CreateFile/ReadFile/WriteFile calls any process does. There are several command line options available:


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You can use the FileSystemWatcher class Listens to the file system change notifications and raises events when a directory, or file in a directory, changes. You can use the different events Changed Created Deleted Renamed and also read this FileSystemWatcher Tips An example: public void MyFileWatcher(string path) { FileSystemWatcher ...


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Read carefully proc(5). /proc/ is a pseudo "virtual" file system containing pseudo files and directories. These do not consume any resources on the disk (and not much in kernel memory - the kernel needs a tiny amount of memory to serve /proc/ independent of the apparent size of files in it.). They are just a convenient interface between the kernel and the ...


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Some of the configuration tools of the Linux NET-2 and NET-3 release rely on the /proc filesystem for communicating with the kernel. This interface permits access to kernel runtime information through a filesystem-like mechanism. When mounted, you can list its files like any other filesystem, or display their contents. Typical items include the loadavg file, ...


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It really depends on the size of your files. Storing large files in Cassandra generally isn't the best solution. You'd have to chunk your files at some point to store the content in separate columns using wide rows. In this case it would be better to use a distributed file system like ceph. But if files are only 20k, the overhead using a distributed FS ...


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This is a great answer I copied below. Basically, named pipes let you do this in scripting, and Fuse let's you do it easily in Python. You may be looking for a named pipe. mkfifo f { echo 'V cebqhpr bhgchg.' sleep 2 echo 'Urer vf zber bhgchg.' } >f rot13 < f Writing to the pipe doesn't start the listening program. If you want to process ...


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you can also do : $disk = \Storage::disk('s3'); Means you must prepend \ before the storage


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ktrace (kern/kern_ktrace.c), accounting (kern/kern_acct.c), coredumping (kern/kern_sig.c).... or you can check how writing from userspace is implemented and steal that.


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The answer is that NSURL.fileURLWithPath() does not take a URL-path as an argument, only a filesystem-path. So "file:///Volumes/disk/file.xml" is wrong, "/Volumes/disk/file.xml" is correct. The mangling is NSURL prefixing the current directory onto what it thinks is a relative filesystem-path String.


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I think of Flysystem as an interface to a disk (or other storage mechanism) and nothing more. Just as I would not ask my local filesystem to calculate a public URI, I would not ask Flysystem to do it either. I create objects that correspond to the files that I save via Flysystem. Depending on my needs, I might save the public URI directly in the database ...


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Use Synx. It rearranges your files on disk to match your Xcode groups. I try to run it before committing any code that changes the Xcode groups, and it keeps the project nice and tidy.


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Files are manipulated in blocks. A block on disk is like a byte in memory. You can only read and write in units of blocks. 512 bytes used to be the normal block size but 4096 is more common now. The OS will read the entire block into memory; change whatever bytes; then write the entire block to the disk. Clusters are units of file allocation. They are ...


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I want to do the exact same thing as part of an image build for an embedded system. It's really annoying that the entire build, which takes ~3hrs, could be completely unattended except for the final steps which required a password in order to mount a VFAT image. Fortunately, I found a set of tools which solve the problem. You want mcopy provided by GNU ...


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Diferent methods are for each one, remember we have diferent file systems. for example in ntfs when u write a file and it uses for example six cluster it will be like that in your file sistem: 123456 if u add a new file using 1 cluster it will be like that 1234561 so now u remove that first file: 1 and u will write a new file using 3 clusters ...


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You can use camera cordova plugin. https://github.com/apache/cordova-plugin-camera Sample code HTML <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <meta content="telephone=no" name="format-detection"> <!-- WARNING: for iOS 7, remove the width=device-width and height=device-height attributes. See ...


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$ mount -t lwnfs none ./mnt The "none" means there is no physical device or file to use as a file store. That code is pretty old; you'd be better served by using the go-to reference for device drivers: http://gauss.ececs.uc.edu/Courses/c4022/code/memory/understanding.pdf


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writeFile is async. You need a callback like this: var fs = require('fs'); var myFile = "C:/TEMP/" + fileName; fs.writeFile(myFile, rtf, function(err) { if(err) { alert("error"); }else{ lire(); }); var sys = require('sys'); var exec = require('child_process').exec; var child; function lire(){ child = exec("start " + myFile, function ...


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This is quite a vague question in my opinion and highly dependent on your infrastructure, OS, storage type and storage location and the data types you will be storing. It also depends on the amount of data that your application will be handling and the amount of I/Os to disk that you will be doing. I'm going to continue with a vague assumption that you will ...



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