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1

It sort of does tho. You just add your directory paths to the filename and it has a new long filename, but it accomplishes the same thing, keeping you backward compatible with the older max files per folder type of filesystem assuming you branch your code for environment


0

this code`s working for me: #ifdef _WIN32 //win #include "windows.h" #else //linux #include <sys/stat.h> #include <sys/statfs.h> #endif bool GetFreeTotalSpace(const QString& sDirPath, double& fTotal, double& fFree) { double fKB = 1024; #ifdef _WIN32 QString sCurDir = QDir::current().absolutePath(); ...


0

Though this thread seems to be quite old but I am posting a working code here which I wrote for searching files with given search string. It goes through all subfolders and pretty fast to respond in comparison to File.getDirectoryListing() Here is my code protected function performSearch(event:MouseEvent):void { searchResults = ...


0

There are two ways to change it: 1) export LANG=en_US.UTF8 before launching python 2) monkeypatching: import sys sys.getfilesystemencoding = lambda: 'UTF-8' Both methods let functions like os.stat accept unicode (python2.x) strings. Otherwise they raise an exception when they see non-ascii symbols in the filename.


6

Size on disk is a multiple of the disk's block size. Short version: Files aren't stored on disk as the exact number of bytes that they are, because the tiny variances between file sizes can make the process of reading from disk painful and inefficient. Instead, disks have a block size (usually 4096 bytes, although this is user-configurable), and every file ...


0

Possible options: Use LD_PRELOAD to substitute write() with our own implementation. It wont work in general case, since write() is not the only way to change file contents. Use FUSE to create your own filesystem that provides intended behaviour. It will work in general case, but requires more coding. There are also some python bindings. You could try to ...


2

Update My original solution turned out to be just a re-implementation of filetype($filepath) === 'char', so filetype() seems to be the only thing you need. Based on @frymaster's answer ... I looked at how PHP's stat() function works, looking for "char" and found this. Combined with the stat(2) manual for both Linux and FreeBSD, as well as a comment on ...


0

I would like to add an answer here, because this worked for me. I used time delays, while loops, everything I could think of. I had the Windows Explorer window of the output folder open. I closed it, and everything worked like a charm. I hope this helps someone.


0

./file.txt is relative for ./empty-dir/symlink.txt Try use real path: fs.symlinkSync(fs.realpathSync("./file.txt"), "./empty-dir/symlink.txt", "file")


0

Having absolute paths to the files fixes the issue. var fs = require("fs") var path = require("path") fs.symlinkSync(path.resolve("./file.txt"), path.resolve("./empty-dir/symlink.txt"), "file")


0

Ankit, Here, you will have to treat node.js as a "network server", and not simply as a "Web Server". Node.JS at its heart is a network server aimed at handling high performance i/O tasks, and allowing you to use Javascript to do that. Web Server is a type of network server that is implemented by modules on top of node such as express. You need to use some ...


3

syncfs is just a system call, which are easy to trigger in Go. However, since the syscall package does not have the syncfs syscall constant, you can use golang.org/x/sys/unix instead, which has it defined (not really necessity, since a syscall constant is just a number, but using that package doesn't hurt). import "golang.org/x/sys/unix" func syncfs(fd ...


0

Most often such a device is inserted in the Windows Explorer as a Shell Namespace Extension and not like an USB stick with drive letter. Most of the normal file commands like CopyFile(..), FindFirst() or GetFileInfo(..) can not be used directly in such a Shell Namespace extension. Only the CopyHere(..) is working. I needed long time to figure out how to ...


0

In the cloudera post you mentioned, the checkpointing process is clearly mentioned in both HighAvailability and NonHighAvailability scenarios. Secondary name node performs the task of checkpointing namenode in Non-HA scenario. In other scenario of HA, we can use standby namenode for checkpointing. In summary, checkpointing is more of a concept and depending ...


0

The function you are looking for is filemtime(). This lets you determine the last modified date of a file (or directory). That in combination with the various directory functions will allow you to loop through them and check their dates. This is something mocked up off the top of my head to give you a rough idea of how you may go about this: $dir = ...


0

if you have binary image then run any disk check tool and see analyse the output. some of those tools may require you to mount the image so this will probably be much easier on linux. another test you can do is to: mount, install an OS on this image and then run it with virtualbox to check if the system boots correctly


1

The folders that are giving you errors probably aren't actual folders, but symbolic links to folders. They exist for compatibility reasons and have an ACE "everyone deny list folder, this folder only" on them to prevent people from browsing. Don't tamper with them. Make an exclusion list to prevent your script from trying to traverse them. Set exclude = ...


0

Historically, file sizes, offsets, inode numbers and so on were "unsigned long" in the UNIX API, which has 32 bits on 32 bit platforms, and therefore are good for 2GB (when signed) filesizes. Enourmous back then, not even good enough for a DVD image or many movies nowadays. To handle files large than that, most syscalls (and structures passed to/from them) ...


2

If on Linux (specifically) you could use inotify(7) facilities (perhaps via incrontab ...) Alternatively, you might run periodically (thru some crontab(5) entry) a script doing some make with your particular Makefile (since GNU make is designed to care about timestamps) managing e.g. backups. Or you could periodically run some rsync command. However, it ...


4

well, you can use filetype(). if you do a fast ll on urandom, you will see: ll /dev/urandom crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 9 Jul 26 17:38 /dev/urandom that 'c' at the beginnng means it's a "character" filetype. you can check out all the different filetypes here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_file_types this means that if you run ...


1

My first question: What am I missing? Something's wrong because it's mis-behaving. Currently, the path of your spam subvolume with respect to the btrfs root is @/spam because the spam subvolume was created within the @ subvolume. Use btrfs sub list -a / to see this. You will need subvol=@/spam in fstab to mount it. But I think you actually want to ...


0

There is no way to check if an arbitrary string is a directory or file if it does not exist. However for existing paths, you can use fs.stat() on the path, which will give you an object that has methods for checking the path type (e.g. isDirectory(), isFile(), etc).


0

Why not use fs.readdir() ? It throws an error if the given path is a file. try { fs.readdir(path); // It's a dir } catch(e) { if(e.type == "ENOTDIR") { // It's a file } else { // It's another error } }


0

If your system supports it, you can turn on C2 auditing.


1

On Linux FUSE library is built into the OS. On MacOS X there's OSXFUSE which is similar to FUSE on Linux. On Windows there's Callback File System by our company, which offers its own API and a FUSE compatibility layer. Mobile platforms (iOS, Android) neither offer such functions nor give a way to implement them.


1

I believe the issue is this line: books = xlApp.Workbooks.Open("C:\Users\Desktop\ExcelFiles" + str(fileName)) Your most likely missing a trailing slash after ExcelFiles: books = xlApp.Workbooks.Open("C:\Users\Desktop\ExcelFiles\" + str(fileName)) Python provides the cross-platform os.path.join function for cases like this. It will join path strings ...


0

You didn't state if you wanted a read lock or a write lock, but regardless .NET/C# gives you the ability to lock a file, not a directory. A workaround would be to use a stream to place the desired lock on each file in the directory. See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filestream.lock(v=vs.110).aspx. This might not scale very well depending ...


0

The documentation for inotify does not indicate that it shows who did the deletion. A tracing tool such as strace or truss (all system-dependent) can show process-ids and corresponding system calls (such as unlink or remove).


0

One quick suggestion is to load csv from S3 instead of having it in local. Here is a sample scala snippet which can be used to load a bucket from S3 val csvs3Path = "s3n://REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_ACCESS_KEY:REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_SECRET_KEY@REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_S3_BUCKET" val dataframe = sqlContext. read. ...


0

You could use a utility such as inotify to observe the changes in the filesystem. IBM docs on using inotify


0

They are kept in memory in the shell process. You can list them with set (output also includes exported variables and functions).


0

Change "storageformat": null to "defaultInputFormat": null


1

If you have only erased the partition table (or modified it) you can still get your data, if data has not been reused for something else. ext2 filesystems have a MAGIC number in superblock, so to recover your partition you have only to search for it. I did this on one machine and was able to recover not one, but seven partitions in one disk. You have some ...


1

You can obtain this information using the DiskArbitration framework. To use the example below, you must link against and #import it. #import <DiskArbitration/DiskArbitration.h> ... - (BOOL)isDMGVolumeAtURL:(NSURL *)url { BOOL isDMG = NO; if (url.isFileURL) { DASessionRef session = DASessionCreate(kCFAllocatorDefault); if (session != ...


0

The FileSystemWatcher.Error event does not monitor errors in the folder, it notifies you when there's a problem with your FileSystemWatcher object: Occurs when the instance of FileSystemWatcher is unable to continue monitoring changes or when the internal buffer overflows. You don't get the Created callback, because the create file operation failed ...


0

For AutoCAD use FileSystemWatcher to watch for the .dwl file being created and deleted. That file has the metadata regarding who opened the file and when. It is deleted when the file is closed and the lock is released. Later versions have a .dwl2 file as well. Things to watch - it can get left behind if AutoCAD crashes. I don't recall if it is created when ...


0

Short answer is YES. Let's use Google Drive as an example, since its local database is not encrypted, and it's easy to see what's going on. Basically it keeps a snapshot of the Google Drive folder. You can browse the snapshot.db (typically under %USER%\AppData\Local\Google\Drive\user_default) using DB browser for SQLite. Here's a sample from my computer: ...


1

$regex is an "Iterator", you need to iterate over it (using foreach($regex as $file) for example) to get the individual values. You need to iterate/loop over that object - in the same way that you'd iterate over a database resultset - to get the individual values: foreach($regex as $file) { var_dump($file); } Note that $file is an array in this ...


2

Yes, there is a dedicated service for this purpose. It is the Azure Blob Storage. And you are highly advised to save all and any user uploaded content to that service instead to the local file system. The provided link has samples for almost any language that has client SDK provided by microsoft. If, at the end you use some platform or language that is ...


0

If your file is only in one location you could try the following: cd "$(find ~/ -name [filename] -exec dirname {} \;)" && ... You can use -exec to invoke dirname with the path that find returns (which goes where the {} placeholder is). That will change directories. You can also add double ampersands ( && ) to execute the next command after ...


1

I found my answers here by going to each filesystem's articles and looking up its Date Resolution. FAT8 Does not record dates and is not supported in Windows. FAT12, FAT16, FAT16B and FAT32 Some of these are not supported in Windows. Last Modified Time: 2 s Creation Time: 10 ms Access Time: 1 day Deletion Time: 2 s exFAT 10 ms for all records. NTFS ...


0

I guess that https://github.com/samundrak/quicksharejs/blob/master/routes/QuickShare.js acts as a singleton?


2

Latest (and possibly final) Answer : Recently I formatted a SD Card through an android phone (Jellybean) just to check the newly formatted file system. It turned out to be FAT system. FAT systems (any version) do not support UTF-16 Long Filenames. It only supports UCS-2 Long Filenames. (The former supports Surrogate pairs while the latter doesn't) From ...


0

Thanks for the answers. I did it in that way. This code runs in a loop that check 32 Byte Chunks form a FAT Directory to find a directory entry what match: int extensionPos=0; int extensionCounter = 0; int j; int fnf=0; //file not found marker int hasExtension=0; //Check if filename has an extension and remember the position for ...


0

It depends which FAT Version are you dealing with. E.g. it's different of the numbers of clusters. But in general you can find everything important in FAT Specification. The chapter FAT Initialisatzion explain how to calculate the location of FAT. Another example you find here in OS DEV


0

Frequently, inodes are implemented on b-trees and as a minor optimization, the can grow as needed, but don't collapse.


0

What you're seeing is correct. Many Linux filesystems never shrink the size of a directory inode; they just blank out the entries for deleted files, allowing them to be reused if more files are added to the directory later. The only way to return the directory to its original size may be to delete it and create a new one with the same name.


1

Use java's WatchService API. The WatchService API is fairly low level, allowing you to customize it. You can use it as is, or you can choose to create a high-level API on top of this mechanism so that it is suited to your particular needs. - Java Docs When WatchService detects a file or directory change it can notify you of watch file or directory was ...


0

Assuming you're using GCC and C++. You will need to use a string, not a char. "\u0001" Here is an example: #include <iostream> #include <fstream> int main() { std::ofstream out("foo.tmp"); out << "\u0001"; return 0; }


0

Im not quite sure about what you need so i give you what i understand: #include<stdio.h> #include<string.h> int main(void){ char filename[256] = "one.txt"; char shortname[11] = "ONE TXT"; size_t lenght = strlen(filename); unsigned int i; while(shortname[i]|=' ', shortname[++i]) { ; } ...



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