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32

At certain point I want to prevent changing its value Do that in application logic. Make the variable only accessible through methods. Keep a flag tracking any change to the variable. After you've applied the change or reached the certain point, raise the flag, and throw an exception for any further attempts at changing the variable. final is a ...


12

final refers to not being able to change the reference, e.g. you cannot say name = new StringBuilder(). It does not make the referenced object immutable. Immutability is a property of a class. An object of a mutable type is always mutable.


9

It's not a matter of just changing access specifier - you might change everything about the internal representation. Suppose you have three byte values as part of the state of your object. You could store them in a single int field, or you could store them in three byte fields. If you keep the field (or fields) private, providing access to the state only, ...


5

You have to start making the distinction between variables, values (reference values and primitive values) and objects and primitives. A variable is container for a value. That value is either a reference value (for objects) or a primitive value. You cannot use the assignment operator to assign a new value to a final variable once it has been initialized ...


4

The C++ grammar allows final to appear in two different places. One is a class-virt-specifier which can appear after the class name in a class declaration, which is how you've used it. Despite the name, using a class-virt-specifer has nothing to do with virtual functions and is allowed in non-polymorphic classes. The other place it can be used is a ...


4

Then you should extract your inner class and get the fields from the new class; the only reason you get that error is because it must be final to access the field in the inner class. Something like, static class MyListener implements ActionListener { private File selectedPDF; private String selectedPDFName; public File getSelectedPDF() { ...


4

If you can extend an immutable class (which means it's not final), you can add mutable properties to the sub-class, which would make your sub-class mutable, and therefore the base class would also be mutable, since it can have mutable sub-classes.


3

An immutable class doesn't necessarily need to be final, but you need to prevent it from being subclassed, e.g. by not having public or protected constructors. For example, Guava's ImmutableList class isn't final, but it is immutable, as described in the Javadoc.


3

It is because the fields are initialized in the constructor public ArrayBlockingQueue(int capacity, boolean fair) { if (capacity <= 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException(); this.items = new Object[capacity]; lock = new ReentrantLock(fair); notEmpty = lock.newCondition(); notFull = ...


3

It's very simple: a class is immutable if whenever you create an instance of it, you cannot change that instance's internal state/data. Whether you implement that using final or some other mechanism is another question.


3

From the Effective Java 2nd edition, by Joshua Bloch: To make a class immutable, follow these five rules: Don’t provide any methods that modify the object’s state (known as mutators). Ensure that the class can’t be extended. This prevents careless or malicious subclasses from compromising the immutable behavior of the class by behaving as if the object’s ...


2

If your class represents a jug, it should not hold information about two jugs. maxAmount or volume should be a non-static member of the class: public class Jug { public final double volume; private double currentAmount = 0; public Jug(double vol) { volume = vol; } ... }


2

Is Person immutable? No it isn't. An immutable class is final and only has final members. In your case, what you want to use is a builder class: final Person person = new PersonBuilder().withFather(xx).withMother(xx).build(); This way you can make all members of Person final, and since Person is itself final, you get a real immutable class.


2

static final members are initialized before other static members. non final static members are initialized in order of appearance Therefore, in your first case : static Test t=new Test(); static int a=5; The constructor is first called before a is initialized, so a=0 is displayed. In the second case, static final a is initialized before t, so ...


2

I think you're confusing a variable being constant and a class attribute being immutable. Constant usually refers to things that are constant throughout your program. A good example is Math.PI, these are declared static + final. Being immutable is the concept an attribute that cannot be changed after object creation, this can be enforced using final, or ...


2

Static keyword is not needed since the manufacturer and screen size differs television to television. I suppose you didn't forget to mention the volume in the constructor argument. Your code changes to follows. class Television { private final String manufacturer; // your declaration is correct as per your requirement but the naming convention is wrong ...


2

That assertion is oversimplified and therefore wrong. Only methods of a final class can be considered implicitly final. This fact is however irrelevant in itslef, as methods of a final class cannot be overriden because there can't be any subclasses. It doesn't really matter if they're final or not, implicitly or explicitly.


2

An int[] is an object type (not a primitive and not an int). The final reference means you can't reassign the reference when referring to an Object instance. final int [] a1 = {1, 2}; a1 = {3,4}; // <-- illegal, a1 is final. In fact, Java is making the value final in both cases (the value of an Object is its' reference).


1

final keyword class On a class it means you forbid to have a child class extending yours. public final class finalClass Attribute/Field final MyObject value = new MyObject() means you won't be able to modify the instance of the object. value = xxxx won't be allowed, but you still can modify the object itself value.field = "xxx"; Method When you use ...


1

The java Final keyword can be used in many context. Variable - If you make any variable as final, you cannot change the value of final variable(It will be constant). Method - If you make any method as final, you cannot override it. Class - If you make any class as final, you cannot extend it. read more The finally Block The finally block always ...


1

Final:- It is used in the following cases: If the final keyword is attached to a variable then the variable becomes constant i.e. its value cannot be changed in the program. If a method is marked as final then the method cannot be overridden by any other method. If a class is marked as final then this class cannot be inherited by any other class. If a ...


1

final It is used in the following three cases: If the final keyword is attached to a variable then the variable becomes constant i.e. its value cannot be changed in the program. If a method is marked as final then the method cannot be overridden by any other method. If a class is marked as final then this class cannot be inherited by any other class. ...


1

The final keyword depends on where you use it: public final class ..., here you say that this class cannot be a super class (so no one can inherit this). public final String someField, here you say that the String someField cannot be changed (after it has been initialized for the first time of course). public final myMethod() { ... }, here the method ...


1

Static variables are initialized when the class gets loaded by class loader. So when first line “static Test t=new Test();” gets executed, the value of int “a” is not yet initialized, hence it is showing as 0. But other 3 cases (i.e. removing static, adding final or without any modifier) what happens a gets initialized at the time of Object creation of Test ...


1

Java Language specification is best source to understand all about initialization order. According to that in your scenario, static final field gets initialized before any class level variable gets initialized. When you remove the final, initialization was deferred. It should also be noted if you change static Test t=new Test(); static int a=5; to ...


1

yes it is allowed even if your class is not virtual: from cppreference: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/final When used in a class definition, final specifies that this class may not appear in the base-specifier-list of another class definition (in other words, cannot be derived from). The override keyword on the other hand makes no ...


1

There are three forms of final variables: class final variables, instance final variables, local final variables. There is no requirement to initialize a final variable at declaration but it must initialize before using it. You can only initialize a final variable once. class Program { /* Class Final Variables*/ //Static means its common ...


1

Use an immutable object: public class Thing { private int value; public Thing(int value) { this.value = value; } public int getValue() { return this.value; } } Then just replace it when it needs modification: Thing x = Thing(1); // do some stuff x = Thing(2); // more stuff If you're thinking, "But then they can still modify the value by ...


1

A class can be final, but mutable. The class being final just means there can be no subclasses, but says nothing about the behaviour of the class. Conversely, fields and methods can be final (and the instances immutable), but the class not final. Finality of a class and of class members are unrelated.



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