Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

48

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/initial.html, chapter "Initializing Instance Members": The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. That is to say: { printX(); } Test() { System.out.println("const called"); } behaves exactly like: Test() { printX(); System.out.println("const called"); } ...


32

At certain point I want to prevent changing its value Do that in application logic. Make the variable only accessible through methods. Keep a flag tracking any change to the variable. After you've applied the change or reached the certain point, raise the flag, and throw an exception for any further attempts at changing the variable. final is a ...


25

JLS is saying that you must assign the default value to blank final instance variable in constructor (or in initialization block which is pretty the same). That is why you get the error in the first case. However it doesn't say that you can not access it in constructor before. Looks weird a little bit, but you can access it before assignment and see default ...


24

I couldn't find the exact reason about this in JLS, so I went through the byte code and found that the reason is that the compiler couldn't inline the value of i in the second case, but is able to do it in the first case. Here's the code: final int x = 90; System.out.println(x); final int i; i = 90; System.out.println(i); The compiled byte code looks ...


18

Your final int i member variable is a constant variable: 4.12.4. final Variables A variable of primitive type or type String, that is final and initialized with a compile-time constant expression (§15.28), is called a constant variable. This has consequences for the order in which things are initialized, as described in 12.4.2. Detailed Initialization ...


14

Final classes cannot be extended. Non final classes with final methods, can be extended (new methods can be added in subclasses) but the the existing final methods cannot be overridden.


13

Is there any sense in marking a base class function as both virtual and final? Yes, at least temporarily. I found myself in a relatively large and unfamiliar existing C++ source code base. Much of the code was written prior to C++11. I found that I wanted to ensure that all overrides of a virtual function in a base class were marked with override. ...


12

It makes no difference; object definitions are always final. The language specification explicitly mentions this in 5.4 Modifiers: final is redundant for object definitions.


12

Not that anyone does this, but: $ scala -Yoverride-objects Welcome to Scala version 2.11.2 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.8.0_11). Type in expressions to have them evaluated. Type :help for more information. scala> trait A { object O } ; trait B extends A { override object O } defined trait A defined trait B scala> trait A { final object ...


12

final refers to not being able to change the reference, e.g. you cannot say name = new StringBuilder(). It does not make the referenced object immutable. Immutability is a property of a class. An object of a mutable type is always mutable.


11

Because qualifying it with final makes the variable a constant variable, which is a constant expression. So final byte b = 1; char c = 2; c = b; // line 2 actually becomes final byte b = 1; char c = 2; c = 1; And the compiler has a guarantee that the value 1 can fit in a char variable. With a non constant byte variable, there is no such guarantee. ...


10

Enter the Singleton pattern: public class Clazz { public static void main(String[] args) { MyObject myObject = MyObject.getInstance(); } } class MyObject { private static MyObject instance; //I belong to the class, but I need not be created before somebody wants me. private MyObject() { } public static MyObject ...


9

The JLS #4.12.4 defines constant variables as (emphasis mine): A variable of primitive type or type String, that is final and initialized with a compile-time constant expression, is called a constant variable. In your case, final int c = 20; is a constant variable but final int c; c = 20; is not.


9

It's not a matter of just changing access specifier - you might change everything about the internal representation. Suppose you have three byte values as part of the state of your object. You could store them in a single int field, or you could store them in three byte fields. If you keep the field (or fields) private, providing access to the state only, ...


8

static means that a field or method belongs to the class, as opposed to individual instances of the class. final actually means different things when applied to methods versus fields (or local variables): final variables and fields cannot be reassigned. This is fairly similar to C++'s const. final methods cannot be overridden, which only applies to ...


8

Making those variables final also makes them constant variables. That means the compiler can replace the use of the variables with the value they are initialized with. As such, the compiler attempts to produce the following while (10 < 20) This is equivalent to while (true) That will make it an infinite loop and the code that comes after the block ...


8

Move the fields up to the base class and initialize them through a constructor: public abstract class MessageField { public final int fieldId; public final String tag; protected MessageField(int fieldId, String tag) { this.fieldId = fieldId; this.tag = tag; } public int getFieldId() { return fieldId; } ...


7

You cannot. The closest thing you can do is give Defaults a private constructor private Defaults() {} ...and provide factory methods only for the allowed classes: public static Defaults<String> stringDefaults() { return new Defaults<>(); } public static Defaults<Integer> integerDefaults() { return new Defaults<>(); } public ...


7

A final variable can only be assigned if it is definitely unassigned. That is, "might" is referring to the fact that the variable is not definitely unassigned: Similarly, every blank final variable must be assigned at most once; it must be definitely unassigned when an assignment to it occurs. For instance, consider this code which makes the wording of ...


7

A static variable does not belong to any instance of an object. The this keyword should refer to an instance of an object and variables used within. While you can use the this keyword to access static variables, you should not. Also, a variable marked private in a super class cannot be accessed within a child class. To reference a variable declared in a ...


7

A static final class is not a variable, it is a type that cannot be sub-typed. A final field or variable cannot be reassigned, doing so is a compiler error. Perhaps you are shadowing a final field. final int v = 0; // <-- v is 0. public void doSomething() { int v = 1; // <-- this "v" shadows the field "v". } However, this final int t = 0; t = 1; ...


7

The final-modifier on a class does not mean that the properties are also final and immutable. It just means that the class cannot be a parent-class anymore. It is not possible to extend a final class. See Use of final class in Java


7

Yes. For example when you want to have a counter variable to count how many objects have been created from a class, you'll make it static - it's associated with the class and not an object, but it's not final since it's changing: protected static int counter = 0; //constructor counter++; Worth mentioning note: I didn't mention the Singleton example ...


6

String[] mystring = { "this is string one", "this is string two", "this is string three", "this is string four", "this is string five" }; int idx = new Random().nextInt(mystring.length); String random = (mystring [idx]);


6

Your Strings seem very related, since you have a use case that needs to randomly choose one among them. Therefore, they should probably be gathered in an array anyway (on a semantic point of view). There won't be more "runtime filling" than with your current multiple fields: public final class MyStrings { public static final String[] strings = { ...


6

When compiling with -target 1.8, javac will emit class files with a version number of 52.0 which is not supported by previous JVMs. So even if that’s the only difference it prevents you from executing files compiled with -target 1.8. And javac doesn’t support specifying -source 1.8 and -target 1.7 at the same time. It will produce the error message source ...


6

The problem is not that this is a final reference - it's not itself a reference at all. this is a keyword that "denotes a value that is a reference to the object for which the instance method or default method was invoked" (JLS §15.8.3). Furthermore, it wouldn't make sense to reassign it in the sense that a variable can be reassigned. Remember that ...


6

He's asserting that that variable mustn't change within the method. It's essentially a coding safety check. i.e. the compiler will raise an error if the variable is re-assigned to (most likely accidentally) and is often regarded as a good practise. You may see something similar with method parameters e.g. public void method(final Object a) { // ... } ...


5

Basically what happened is that the static final combination on primitives and Strings cause them to be inlined by the compiler, and this might have prevented the static initialization block from execution, since a class is never loaded by the classloader, as a.a was resolved during compilation


5

Note that declaring a parameter final in Java is an implementation detail while a const parameter in C/C++ changes the method signature! final only means that the variable will not change. Any object referenced by the variable CAN change. So, final means NOTHING for the caller of the method. In contrast a const parameter defines a contract with the caller: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible