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1

You should put the answer checking in a separate method outside of the action listener, and have the action listener call that method with the answer string as a parameter. That way, you can define all variables and use them outside of the action listener. Example: Random rand = new Random(); int randomNumber = rand.nextInt(); ...


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You can use javaagent to inject code into any Java method, thereby changing its behavior, similar to overriding it in an extended class. See Tutorials about javaagents. Good chance there is an easier solution to what you are trying to achieve. What are you trying to achieve?


3

final will prevent you to assign any new value to the variable, but it won't make your object immutable. In your example, private final foo HashSet<String>() = new HashSet<>(); foo.put("bar"); // is correct foo = new HashSet<>(); // will fail at compilation


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You are right. It is a good practice to declare variables, who won't have their value changed during the execution of the program as final. This will help you detect invalid operations (changing the value) on the variable at compile time and prevent some nasty bugs from creeping into your codebase. This is why many code style tools highlight such variables ...


1

It is suggesting that because you do not change cookies in this example (after the first call to getCookies(), that it should be declared final. I would listen to the warning. If that is what you want, final offers an additional protection against the program (or you) trying to write to cookies if you shouldn't be.


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First You should understand the advantages of Final. If we declare any variable as a final variable then that variable we cannot reinitialize it again and again. I guess, In your code those variables are Initialize once and using many times. That's why tool suggest to declare that variable as a final variable. Final variables --- Initializing once and ...


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yes, final keyword can be used for a method. It will preserve the immutability. it prevents between methods from being broken. For example, suppose the implementation of some method of class X assumes that method M will behave in a certain way. Declaring X or M as final will prevent derived classes from redefining M in such a way as to cause X to behave ...


1

Final keyword is usually used to preserve immutability. To use final for classes or methods is to prevent linkages between methods from being broken. For example, suppose the implementation of some method of class X assumes that method M will behave in a certain way. Declaring X or M as final will prevent derived classes from redefining M in such a way as to ...


1

Final keyword is usually used to preserve immutability. To use final for classes or methods is to prevent linkages between methods from being broken. For example, suppose the implementation of some method of class X assumes that method M will behave in a certain way. Declaring X or M as final will prevent derived classes from redefining M in such a way as to ...


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The final keyword also enforce you to initialize a variable while it is declaring. If you try to write something like this - final A a ; //only declare not initialized Then you will get a compilation error.


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Once you declare and initialize a variable (no matter whether it is primitive or reference type) with the final keyword you can never reinitialize it. That means after this statement - final A a = new A(); You can never assign a to a new reference like this - a = new A(); //another instance/object of `A` is created But if you declare a no-final ...


3

The line creates an instance of class A and assigns it to variable a. The final means the variable cannot be reassigned. So you can use final when you don't reassign the variable. For example, the following code raises compilation error: final A a = new A(); a = new A(); // reassignment causes error


2

You just can't assign to a val after initialization. In Scala the body of the class IS the constructor, you can see examples here. In general, you just define all variables in the primary constructor itself as "class parameters": class Person(val name: String) if you need to receive the name for initialization or class Person() { val name = 'Joe' } if it ...


2

Java allows marking variables (fields / locals / parameters) as final, to prevent re-assigning into them. I find it very useful with fields, as it helps me quickly see whether some attributes - or an entire class - are meant to be immutable. One important thing is that strive to keep my methods short and clean, each doing a single task. Thus my ...


1

Local variable has no default value right , bt we can declare like this final int a; there has no error but we cannot access it . when we try to access it , then error is occur . But this case is not for class variable . So in your case when you access to print the value of a variable , error occur . Thanks


7

For instance variable level A final variable can be initialized only once. A final variable at class level must be initialized before the end of the constructor. For local (method) level A final variable at method level can be initialized only once. It must be initialized before it is used So basically if you don't use a local final variable you can ...


1

The answer is provided in JLS. A variable can be declared final. A final variable may only be assigned to once. It is a compile-time error if a final variable is assigned to unless it is definitely unassigned immediately prior to the assignment. What is definitive assignment Now, in case of a local variable, it's scope is valid inside the block it's ...


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Within Lambda expressions you can use effectively final variables from the surrounding scope. Effectively means that it is not mandatory to declare variable final but make sure you do not change its state within the lambda expresssion. You can also use this within closures and using "this" means the enclosing object but not the lambda itself as closures are ...


1

Difference : Static belongs to class So You can access it without any instance of the class and hence only one copy of it. While for accessing second one you need instance of an class to access it so you can have as many copy of non static final Object as it belongs to Object. You can Verify with Byte Code: For Static Code: stack=1, locals=1, ...


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The differences between x in MyClass and MyOtherClass are: the first can only be accessed via a MyClass instance and there can be multiple copies of the constant. the second can be accessed without MyOtherClass instance and only one copy can exist. In your example, there is no practical difference1 between having one or multiple instances of the ...


1

If you create multiple instances of both type of classes then, In First scenario all object of MyClass would have own final x field. Where as in second scenario all object of MyOtherClass would have points to one final x class field as because it is static in nature.


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Although final, the JVM does not make any optimizations or assumptions, so each instance of the class will have an instance of x. If you declare the member static, each instance of the class will share the same instance of x because it's statically allocated. Moreover, as written (x has package visibility), other classes can potentially access x statically, ...


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You can try this with java8, IntStream.range(0, 10).forEach(i ->{ someObject.method(() -> otherObj.process(i, i+1)) });


1

Marking a class final does not change its POD status. Quoting C++11: 9 [class]: 6 A trivially copyable class is a class that: has no non-trivial copy constructors (12.8), has no non-trivial move constructors (12.8), has no non-trivial copy assignment operators (13.5.3, 12.8), has no non-trivial move assignment operators (13.5.3, 12.8), and ...


4

According to my understanding, because these "POD" (plain old data) structs do not have a virtual destructor, it is not possible to properly delete a derived class object (if one is allowed to create it) via a pointer of the POD type. It's not possible given a raw pointer, but it is possible given a smart pointer object, such as std::shared_ptr or a ...


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Five years later, I find my original answer unsatisfactory after I stumbled across this post via Google. Another solution would be using no reflection at all, and use the technique suggested by Boann. It also makes use of the GetField class returned by ObjectInputStream#readFields() method, which according to the Serialization specification must be called ...


0

To SRINIVAS K solution: Here is the full stacktrace java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Cannot subclass final class class de.traveltainment.tomamappingconfigurationservice.utils.TOMAMappingUtils at org.mockito.cglib.proxy.Enhancer.generateClass(Enhancer.java:447) at ...


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To mock final class, First add it in prepareForTest. @PrepareForTest({ TOMAMappingUtils.class }) Then mock as static class PowerMockito.mockStatic(TOMAMappingUtils.class); Then set expectation as below. PowerMockito .doThrow(new IOException()) .when(TOMAMappingUtils.class, MemberMatcher.method(TOMAMappingUtils.class, ...


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Just found something. Use createSqlQuery() instead of createQuery() can solve this problem.


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I also integrated it with joor library at https://github.com/iirekm/jOOR Just use Reflect.on(yourObject).setFinal("finalFieldName", finalFieldValue); Also I fixed an issue with override which the previous solutions seem to miss. However use this very carefully, only when there's no other good solution.


0

The JIT can take benefit when some methods declared in such way, when it cannot be overridden. (static, private, final, in final class) let's imagine you have classes: abstract class A { public void doSomething() { // default and only realization; } } class B extends A { ... } Then you write something like: A a = ...


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The abstract class could have package access to some internal methods. In this case we have an incomplete class functionality has to stay the same and grants secured access to the internal model That is all we need to declare a type abstract and all its methods final. Consider as an example a Panel class that holds the graphics, but not always offers a ...


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I'd say it's part of the "core" component. You build something and you design the architecture, and you know that that method should never be changed.


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There are some marginal cases where such design, if perhaps not optimal, could at least be motivated. For example, you may have a system of classes, all subclasses of a common parent, where each subclass implements a further interface. There may be a set of interfaces with different formalities, but the same essential function. In that particalar case it ...



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