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0

Using final or static on a ThreadLocal variable is driven by the same thoughts like using them on any other variable. When to use final? The final keyword is used for a variable which can be only assigned once. And in case of a global one it has to be assigned directly at declaration or in the constructor. In case of a ThreadLocal this make in 99% cases ...


0

String class is Immutable but property hash is not final Well it is possible but with some rules/restrictions and that is access to mutable properties/fields must provide same result every time we access it. In String class hashcode actually calculated on the final array of characters which is not going to change if String has constructed. Therefore ...


-1

For creating immutable class it is not mandatory to mark the class as final. Let me take one of such example from java classes itself "BigInteger" class is immutable but its not final. Actually Immutability is a concept according to which ones the object created then it can not be modified. Let's think from JVM point of view, from JVM point of view all ...


0

For creating immutable class it is not mandatory to mark the class as final. Let me take one of such example from java classes itself "BigInteger" class is immutable but its not final. Actually Immutability is a concept according to which ones the object created then it can not be modified. Let's think from JVM point of view, from JVM point of view all ...


0

The bottomline is that you don't have to have final on ThreadLocal but you would most likely have not just final but also static on it. When you are working on ThreadLocal variables, the noticeable key attribute is such variable would have an instance per thread. Also, you must provide an implementation to the initialValue() method so that the class knows ...


2

Your reference contact is final which means the reference cannot point to anything else. But the contact instance itself is not immutable. For reference types final is NOT immutable. Try creating a defensive copy of contact and passing it to your method (if you don't want the original instance to be changed).


1

private constructor is enough, no need to mark the class final, by having the private constructor we can't subclass it If you make the constructor private you can still access it using reflection. Better approach is throw AssertionError public class Util { private Util() { throw new AssertionError("Can't instantiate"); } // static ...


0

for the util class,you no need provide constructor.because this functions are static,you can use like this: Util.a()


2

Static methods are inherently final, because they can't be overridden by subclasses.


2

Using final only means that the reference cannot be changed to point at another object not whether its contents can be updated or not. If you want an unmodifiable set use something like Collections.unmodifiableSet(yourSet);


6

final simply means that a variable that has been declared final cannot be changed, and a class which is final cannot be inherited from. all variables that aren't primitive are references in Java, which means that they 'point' or refer to an instance of an object, but are not objects themselves. What you are referring to is called an immutable object, which ...


2

You want to look for zipping. Java initially had a zip utility built in, but it was removed. Here's a past stackoverflow response for zipping with streams with an example implementation: Zipping streams using JDK8 with lambda (java.util.stream.Streams.zip). Beyond that to avoid keeping the index externally you can use an IntStream: final List<String> ...


2

Using Streams puts you more in a functional programming paradigm. From that paradigm, it might be better to use a Map function on the collection, rather than mutate external state. This isn't an exact refactor (no logging for null members, for example), but it might be a pseudo-code solution that moves you in the direction you are looking for. private void ...


0

You cannot use a variable that is local to a method for this. However, you could simply use a class field: private int i = 0; private void mergeMemberAndRelationshipData(final List<JsonNode> members, final ArrayNode relationships) { assert members != null : "members cannot be null"; assert relationships != null : "relationships cannot be ...


1

You can inject your config values in the constructor and assign to a final field. @Configuration class MyConfig { private String final prop; public MyConfig(@Value("${prop}") String prop){ this.prop = prop; } }


0

Just an another explanation. Consider this example below public class Outer{ public static void main(String[] args){ Outer o = new Outer(); o.m1(); o=null; } public void m1(){ //int x = 10; class Inner{ Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable(){ public void run(){ ...


2

Look likes you need Lazy initialization. It is a performance optimization to use use when a result is considered to be expensive for some reason. The objectives is to delay an expensive computation until it is necessary and store the result of that expensive computation such that the computation do not need to repeat again. Following is an example: ...


2

You can try the memoize supplier from Guava: Supplier<T> something = Suppliers.memoize(new Supplier<T>() { // heavy computation return result. }); something.get(); something.get(); // second call will return the memoized object.


2

Unfortunately, you can't make a variable final in just any given moment. If a variable is final it can (and must) be initialized in the constructor. You could also do this (credit to npinti for following code): private boolean isMutable; private String someString; public void setMutable(boolean value) { this.isMutable = value; } public void ...


1

When I first came across the use of the final keyword in conjunction with virtual in C++, I was wondering the same thing: If declaring a method virtual makes it inheritable and overridable, and declaring a method final prevents that method from being overriden, doesn't declaring a method both form a contradiction? I think the current accepted answer to ...


1

At least based on my experience, I am told it is recommended to use final if the variable doesn't change after initiation. For primitive type, JVM will treat it as constant and do some optimisation. Other occasions like, in Java, all methods are by default virtual unless declared final. It will also gain computation performance.


1

I think this is because there isn't such a "tradition" in Java. You see, the first book I read about Swift (The Swift Programming Language 2.0 by Apple Inc.) says that every variable you create that is not mutated should be declared as a let constant. Since The Swift Programming Language 2.0 (the book) is the official guide to Swift, almost everyone ...


2

Why isn't Java variable declared as final more often? Is there something I'm missing? What you are missing is "human nature". Simply, the syntax of Java makes it easier NOT to add the final. And in general, people don't, because it is easier not to. Note that the "variables are not final by default" design decision comes from Java's ancestry. Of ...


2

Initialize a variable with final in Java allow compiler makes sure that you can initialize it only once. If it is a primitive type like int or doubles, it can ensure that the value cannot change. However, for Object, final is only about the reference itself, and not about the contents of the referenced object. It makes no guarantees the values inside the ...


5

see In Java, should I use “final” for parameters and locals even when I don't have to? Basically, for fields, it is useful and also changes their concurrency properties. see Java concurrency: is final field (initialized in constructor) thread-safe? However, for local variables and parameters, final's value is less clear. It has some semantic value, but on ...


3

Java follows the traditional C thinking style where if we are creating something(Primitive types or objects) it is a variable by default and you have to put put "final" in java and "const" in C/C++ to make it a constant. Swift is very new as compare to these languages and its goals are safe programming patterns and simplicity. If you gain further experience ...


1

Language design decisions are always a trade off between flexibility and error prevention. In this case, there are some simple questions to check: In case, there is a code path in which a final variable is not assigned: How likely is it that the developer declares a final variable just to hold the default value, null, 0 or false? In contrast, how likely ...


0

It is worth to mention some straightforward definitions: Classes/Methods You can declare some or all of a class's methods final. You use the final keyword in a method declaration to indicate that the method cannot be overridden by subclasses. Variables Once a final variable has been assigned, it always contains the same value. FINAL basically ...


3

Indeed lambdas are somehow evolved anonymous classes so like an anonymous class when you want to use a local variable this variable must be declared as final. In java 8, they added the notion of effectively final which means that even if it has not been defined explicitly with a final keyword it is still considered as final because it is set only once in ...


3

This is a workaround necessary to deal with lambda requirements. Local variables for lambdas must be final or effectively final. No, you can't replace it with int if you want to use lambda. You can change values of elements stored in afinal int[]. That is why you can use it inside of lambda as a counter.


0

Suppose I want to designed class which has some implementation but I do not want others(sub classes) to implement it but other methods, then in that case we need a final implemented method and obvious choice abstract class.


0

Your code is working because your hashCode method is using the final field value from the Immutable class directly instead of using the getter for the field. This field is not changed when using the setValue method from Mutable as this method works on the realValue field only. If you change hashCode to public int hashCode() { int hash = 1; hash = ...



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