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0

It's just poor code. The mmServerSocket variable doesn't need to be final. The constructor should just attempt to construct the BluetoothServerSocket directly without all this fuss. It should also throw IOException if it fails, instead of failing silently and eating the exception and leaving a null variable lying around to cause NPEs later on.


0

This ensures that mmServerSocket is definitely assigned a value exactly once, a requirement that the constructor must satisfy for final instance variables. It might seem like one could avoid a temporary variable as follows: try { mmServerSocket = mBluetoothAdapter.listenUsingRfcommWithServiceRecord(NAME, MY_UUID); } catch (IOException e) { ...


-1

mmServerSocket has to be final, so that it can be used across threads. Since it's final, it can only be assigned to once. Thus, we're first assigning tmp = null, then enter the try/catch block and then assign mmServerSocket. If the assignment of tmp failed, then mmServerSocket is null, otherwise it has a value. If this wasn't done, then the value of ...


5

Is there any sense in marking a base class function as both virtual and final? Yes, at least temporarily. I found myself in a relatively large and unfamiliar existing C++ source code base. Much of the code was written prior to C++11. I found that I wanted to ensure that all overrides of a virtual function in a base class were marked with override. ...


0

The alternative is a non-virtual function. But non-virtual function can be hidden by a derived class. So if you want to prevent a function hiding, it can be specified as virtual final one.


1

Making the variable final makes sure you cannot re-assign that objest reference after it is assigned. f you combine the final keyword with the use of Collections.unmodifiableList, you ge the behavi final List fixedList = Collections.unmodifiableList(someList); This has as result that the list pointed to by fixedList cannot be changed. it can still be ...


1

You can't do this,the reference is FINAL final ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>(); ArrayList<Integer> list2 = new ArrayList<Integer>(); list=list2;//ERROR list = new ArrayList<Integer>();//ERROR JLS 4.12.4 Once a final variable has been assigned, it always contains the same value. If a ...


1

You are getting confused between final and immutable Objects. final --> You cannot change the reference to the collection (Object). You can modify the collection / Object the reference points to. You can still add elements to the collection immutable --> You cannot modify the contents of the Collection / Object the reference points to. You cannot add ...


2

No. It simply means that the reference cannot be changed. final List list = new LinkedList(); .... list.add(someObject); //okay list.remove(someObject); //okay list = new LinkedList(); //not okay list = refToSomeOtherList; //not okay


-1

Declare the constructor of the class to be private. That ensure noninstantiability and prevents subclassing.


0

It is best practice so you dont end up reusing local variable and would be helpful in future to refactor such method.


6

He's asserting that that variable mustn't change within the method. It's essentially a coding safety check. i.e. the compiler will raise an error if the variable is re-assigned to (most likely accidentally) and is often regarded as a good practise. You may see something similar with method parameters e.g. public void method(final Object a) { // ... } ...


0

I tried an experiment with final fields - firstly setting them with initialisers, e.g.: class Test { final int x = 1; private Test() {} } GSON would not deserialise this properly. and then in the constructor... class Test { final int x; private Test() { x = 1; } } This worked. Perhaps it's a Java compiler optimisation, where ...


0

OR simply use a if-elseif case : private final static int ONE = 1; private final static int TWO = 2; public static void main(String[] args) { int value = 1; if(value==ONE){ } else if(value==TWO){ } }


0

Initialize your host string as class variable,So change public static final String host = LoadDataTxt("host.txt"); to String host; and get its value in onCreate method as host = LoadDataTxt("host.txt");


1

The problem here is the fact the host String is declared static, and you actually need an instance of the activity to have a context which is necessary to call getAssets(). Do you really need it to be a static member of your Activity class ?


0

You will need to declare LoadDataTxt method as static to remove the error you are getting.


0

You need two different variables. One to store the word of the day, and the other to store the user's guess. So you'll need to have two different names for them. Maybe wordOfTheDay and usersGuess. Then you can compare them after the user guesses, by changing the condition at the end of your loop to while(!wordOfTheDay.equals(usersGuess));


0

public static final String wordOfTheDay = "Kitten"; since wordOfTheDay declared as final, it can not be assigned any value after this. all final variables can not be assigned a value more than once. so remove final from it as below. public static String wordOfTheDay = "Kitten"; now you can assign value any number of times.


0

Variables declared final cannot be reassigned. To solve the issue, simply remove the final: A final variable can only be initialized once, either via an initializer or an assignment statement. It does not need to be initialized at the point of declaration.


0

wordOfTheDay = input.nextLine(); You've already set wordOfTheDay. it's final, so you can only set it once....


1

The this keyword is used to provide a reference to the current object within its class. Mostly, it is used to clarify scope issues with local variables which have the same identifier as a class member. E.g. public void function (int param) { this.param = param } Reassigning it to another object goes beyond the task assigned to the keyboard. What you ...


6

The problem is not that this is a final reference - it's not itself a reference at all. this is a keyword that "denotes a value that is a reference to the object for which the instance method or default method was invoked" (JLS §15.8.3). Furthermore, it wouldn't make sense to reassign it in the sense that a variable can be reassigned. Remember that ...


2

I find this question interesting from a theoretical point of view. From a technical point of view this cannot work, as in Java we have pass-refererence-by-value ( http://www.javaworld.com/article/2077424/learn-java/does-java-pass-by-reference-or-pass-by-value.html ) and cannot swap out objects where some other parts of code hold a reference to that object ...


0

Wrong thinking about this. this is just a keyword(not variable) in java which referenced to current instance and its a compilation restriction that keyword(any not only this) can not be initialized.


1

this is not a variable you can assign a value to. It is a built-in expression returning the object that is the context for the method currently executing. While re-assigning this might be useful for some nice hacks, it would mess up all kind of things.


0

If you never intend to change a variable, use final or const, either instead of var or in addition to a type. A final variable can be set only once; Example of change variable: // Set variable "person" to "me" var person = me; // Reassing "person" to "you" person = you; Another example: // Set variable "person" to "me" final person = me; ...


4

final doesn't mean deep final. The list variable references still the same list instance even when you modify the lists content. Any mutable instance can be modified even when it was assigned to a final variable. Imagine void main() { var l = [1,2,3]; final List<int> list = l; } Now you wouldn't be able to modify the items in the list ...


5

Günter Zöchbauer already explained the reason for your error. Here is a workaround: Data(Step initializer(Map<String,List<double>> dataReferences)) : this._internal(initializer, new Map()); Data._internal(initializer, map) : _dataMap = map, _updateStep = initializer(map);


2

You are reading from _dataMap (initializer(_dataMap)). _datamap is a field of this it is not an argument. You can't read fields from 'this' in constructor initializers as the error message says.


0

1. public Foo(int age, int weight) don't work, because fooAge and fooWeight are final. 2. System.out.println(Foo.FOONAME) don't work. because FOONAME not static 3. List<String> names = new ArrayList<>(); //creates a new resizable arrayList class don't work. because only ArrayList is imported 4. height = null; // gives ...


0

Some issues First, you defined a variable as final, but you tried to assign new value to it later. In the Java programming language, the final keyword is used in several different contexts to define an entity which cannot later be changed. Second , if we imagine height was not final, you assigned fooHeight value of height and you assign it null why? ...


0

First, comments are good, but I think you may just have a few too many, making the code slightly un-readable. Seconds, the manening of final means you can not change the variable to point to a new variable, so as you already have private final int fooAge = 23; it means that fooAge can not be changed. if you do not want this functionality then remove ...


2

Take a look at your constructor of Foo` public Foo(int age, int weight) { fooAge = age; fooWeight = weight; } But these fooAge and fooWeight are final private final int fooAge = 23; private static final int fooWeight = 150; You can't alter final variables. final it self has the meaning what is final variable. Solution: you can use non ...


1

@Butterflow from Brian Goetz: Declaring a final field helps the optimizer make better optimization decisions, because if the compiler knows the field's value will not change, it can safely cache the value in a register. final fields also provide an extra level of safety by having the compiler enforce that a field is read-only. You can find here the ...


0

With anonymous classes, you are actually declaring a nested class that depends on the instance of the enclosing class where it is declared. For this to happen, the compiler needs to modify the original code, and provide a constructor for the nested instance class that will take all of the references it uses from the enclosing class. If you were allowed to ...


1

With anonymous classes, you are actually declaring a nested class that depends on the instance of the enclosing class where it is declared. For this to happen, the compiler needs to modify the original code, and provide a constructor for the nested instance class that will take all of the references it uses from the enclosing class. If you were allowed to ...


1

No, this is not like macros in C++. The difference is that macros are evaluated at compile time and the preprocessor replace the macro with its definition. final variables on the other hand can be computed at run time. Once set, though, the value cannot change at a later time. This constraint is what makes it possible to use the value in an inner class. ...


10

Not that anyone does this, but: $ scala -Yoverride-objects Welcome to Scala version 2.11.2 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.8.0_11). Type in expressions to have them evaluated. Type :help for more information. scala> trait A { object O } ; trait B extends A { override object O } defined trait A defined trait B scala> trait A { final object ...


13

It makes no difference; object definitions are always final. The language specification explicitly mentions this in 5.4 Modifiers: final is redundant for object definitions.


1

The reason that final only impacts the actual object instead of the object's properties likely ties back to the fact that Java is pass-by-value. The definition of a final variable, per the Java Language Specification, gives us this tidbit, emphasis mine: Once a final variable has been assigned, it always contains the same value. If a final variable ...


0

If final would have been a recursive modifier (which is what I think you mean), this would have been horibble. It means that every object pointed by a final object would be immutable, and so on, and you can end up with the entire memory unmodifyable... If, for some reason, you want the fields of some instances of your class to be modifyable, while others to ...


1

Declaring an object as const, rather than the pointer has a dramatic impact. In order to ensure the immutability, it is not enough that the code containing the const declaration must not modify fields through this reference, it is not allowed to invoke any methods on that object which could modify the object. Therefore, every method must be marked as either, ...


1

Adding final to a static method can actually make a difference. Consider the following code: class A { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("A"); } } class B extends A { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("B"); } } class C extends B { } public class Test { public static ...


0

This is a very good interview question. Sometimes they might even ask you what is the difference between a final object and immutable object. 1) When someone mentions a final object, it means that the reference cannot be changed, but its state(instance variables) can be changed. 2) An immutable object is one whose state can not be changed, but its ...


0

In Java, a variable of any object type (including any array) actually is a reference to an object, not the object itself. When you declare a variable to be final, it means that the reference will not change, meaning that the object it references will always be the same object. However, if the internal state of the object can still change without the final ...


1

Yes, because you don't change the reference of usr but what it contains. final block you from doing something like usr = new String[5]; (change the usr to another array) but the content of the array can be changed without problems. final String[] a = new String[5]; a = new String[3]; // illegal final String[] a = new String[5]; a[0] = "Hello"; // legal, i ...



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