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4

You have to call FindWindowEx() for each child level that you want to go down, specifying the HWND found in the previous level as the parent, eg: HWND hWnd = FindWindow("XYZ_Widget_1", NULL); if (hWnd != NULL) { hWnd = FindWindowEx(hWnd, NULL, "XYZ_Widget_0", NULL); if (hWnd != NULL) { hWnd = FindWindowEx(hWnd, NULL, "XYZ_Renderer", ...


3

List view items and subitems are not window handles. They are internal children of the list view, exposed using the LVM_GETITEM and LVM_SETITEM messages and the LVITEM structure. (Subitems use the same interface; the iSubItem member of LVITEM would be nonzero in this case.)


3

I suspect that the actual text of the button isn't just "Weiter >" but also includes an & in there, for the accelerator key. Try pressing Alt and see if a letter appears with an undescore under it. If it does, then that letter is prefixed with an &. This "solution" is actually pretty flimsy though and could easily break. For example, what if the ...


3

Use the second parameter to FindWindowEx() called "hwndChildAfter": A handle to a child window. The search begins with the next child window in the Z order. The child window must be a direct child window of hwndParent, not just a descendant window. So you should be able to pass the first textbox handle in to get the next one like this: txt2 = ...


3

I found a solution to this. The reason FindWindowEx didn't work was because it only works on child windows that have WS_CHILD style, and apparently dialog windows do not have this style. It is why EnumChildWindows won't work either (I've tried). So the ugly solution is EnumWindows combined with GetParent to compare the handle and the text. struct ...


3

I think it is as simple as : For Each t As ProcessThread In p.Threads EnumThreadWindows(t.Id, AddressOf MyEnumThreadWindowsProc, IntPtr.Zero) Next VB.NET uses the AddressOf keyword to indicate method pointers for delegates, etc. For the IntPtr conversion, perhaps use CType instead of DirectCast : startWnd = FindWindowEx(IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero, ...


3

Call EnumChildWindows passing the parent window as hwndParent. Your window is the window with class name equal to XYZ_Renderer. The documentation states that: If a child window has created child windows of its own, EnumChildWindows enumerates those windows as well.


2

Why not just use a named EventWaitHandle that indicates whether one of those message boxes is currently displayed? All of your applications could subscribe to that event. When an application sees that it's time to display the message box, it checks to see if the wait handle is set. If it's not set, then the application sets the event and displays the message ...


2

SendMessage is a synchronous call: it waits for the message to be processed before returning. From your description, it sounds like the handler for BM_CLICK displays a modal dialog, which means that SendMessage won't return until the modal dialog is dismissed. Try PostMessage instead.


1

Don't think you can specify anything in FindWindowEx that will differentiate between the different Edit child windows. You could call GetWindowsRect with the handle of each of the child windows and find the one that is positioned in the top left of the form. You could also call GetWindowLength - that would remove the Port edit box easily enough (as it is ...


1

It looks like you want the second TPanel under the TttgCenterPanel. In order to do that, you can find the first TPanel (you already did this), and after that, find the TPanel that is a descendant of TttgCenterPanel, and comes after the first TPanel. You need to pass hwndChild5 into the hwndChildAfter ofFindWindowEx`. ' .... all the stuff you did before ...


1

You cannot expect WM_KEYDOWN messages sent to applications that do not have the focus to have the desired effect. it is simply not supported. Receiving a WM_KEYDOWN message implies, by the rules of Windows, that your application has the focus. Only focused applications can get keyboard input. So what you are trying might work in certain cases, but it is not ...


1

You didn't notice when you created your window, that you had to call RegisterClassEx (or plain RegisterClass)? ;) Each window has a class. When you create your own, you specify its class. *Edit: given your ambiguous tagging, I'm not really sure how you wrote your app. If you're using .NET then you obviously didn't have to manually call the C++ function ...


1

Try this out: Dim hwndParent As Long = FindWindow(vbNullString, "Genymotion") ' Parent Window by Caption Dim hwndButton As Long = FindWindowEx(hwndParent, IntPtr.Zero, "QWidget", "") ' First Child QWidget hwndButton = FindWindowEx(hwndParent, hwndButton, "QWidget", "") ' Second Child QWidget hwndButton = FindWindowEx(hwndButton, IntPtr.Zero, ...


1

I'm guessing here, so please give it a try: Instead of: For Each t As ProcessThread In p.Threads EnumThreadWindows(t.Id, MyEnumThreadWindowsProc, IntPtr.Zero) Next Try: For Each t As ProcessThread In p.Threads Dim returnMyEnumThreadWindowsProc As Object ...


1

Once you have the HWND handle to a window, you can use GetWindowLong(GWL_HINSTANCE) or GetWindowThreadProcessId() to check which application instance the window belongs to. Use EnumWindows() to enumerate all top-level windows, where your callback function checks the title and process instance of each reported window until you find a match you are looking ...



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