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5

I don't believe that sage itself has any finite element codes, but femhub (femhub.org) is a subset of sage specifically designed for finite element analysis.


4

Really understanding Finite Element Methods requires quite a bit of fairly advanced mathematics; unless you have a few years to devote to the cause, let's leave that aside for now. That said, the basic ideas underlying FEM are fairly simple if you have some experience with ODE solvers. Can you tell us some more about your background and what you really ...


4

Never tried, no releases, but source code is available: http://oofem.codeplex.com/ However, this CodePlex project appears to require the MtxVec math library from Dew Research which is not open source or free. (Note the 'uses MTxVec' in the source code). Edit: I accepted the answer: It's sofar the only advanced opensource Delphi I come accross. To share my ...


3

Your question is unclear. I don't know what you want to know, because it's impossible to tell what you're ignorant of here. You don't deal with advanced math every day. What do you know about the finite element method? Here are topics you'll need to know: Statics and dynamics; how to draw free body diagrams Solid mechanics - strength of materials, ...


3

To the best of my knowledge the most commonly used Python Finite Element library is FiPy. I use this library frequently, and i recommend it highly. It is a mature, stable project (current stable version is 2.1.2), currently maintained by its creator, the Materials Measurement Library of the US Government Institute, NIST.The documentation and (working) ...


3

You should try to specify the kind of problems you are trying to solve in order to select the best library for you. How many dimensions for your problem? Do you plan on doing collision detection? How many vertices will compose your objects? Do you plan on using parallelism to achieve real-time computations? Do you plan on doing spectral analysis for a ...


2

From what I know, there's only one company that provides .NET software for finite element analysis. Visit Anaxsoft (www.anaxsoft.com). They provide a finite element analysis SDK for the .NET Framework.


2

It was a CGAL out-of-date problem. MODIFICATION: "set(CGAL_3RD_PARTY_LIBRARIES "/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libboost_thread.so;/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libboost‌​_system.so;/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpthread.so" )" in CGALConfig.cmake file The Bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/cgal/+bug/1242111


2

There are a number of numerical techniques that could be used to solve this problem, finite elements being probably the most common. If you have a mesh of the fluid flow domain already (presumably the voids/cracks in the rock) it would be very straightforward to set up and run the flow model with pretty much any CFD package (finite element based or not) and ...


2

I am fairly sure that this is a well known problem in FEM analysis - I found reference to it in this scipy documentation, but of course the principals are language independent. Basically what you should do is create your matrix in the format you have, but instead of searching the matrix to see whether an entry already exists, just assume that it doesn't. ...


2

If you use a data structure that is pre-sorted it would be very efficient to search it. Either as your primary data structure or as an auxiliary data structure. You want one that you can insert another entry into the middle. For example, a binary search tree (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_tree).


2

The compiling error seems normal to me. As far as I know, you first declare variables before the executable instructions. Now, since you are using fortran 66/77 that doesn't check type of arguments at compilation, one solution is to consider A and JDOF as one 1D array in both cases. Using the fact that fortran stores arrays columnwise, you are all set to get ...


1

It's a simple matter of understanding that force is a vector quantity. Given known angle(s), calculate the components in the coordinate system of choice. You might really be asking "If I know that my force is normal to a surface in its local coordinate system, how do I calculate its components in global (x, y, z) system?" If that's your real question, ...


1

Mesh & space Definition We define a square unit with Nx=10 mesh and Ny=10 this provides 11 nodes on x axis and the same for y axis. int Nx=10,Ny=10; int Lx=1,Ly=1; mesh Sh= square(Nx,Ny,[Lx*x,Ly*y]); //this is the same as square(10,10) fespace Vh(Sh,P1); // a space of P1 Finite Elements to use for u definition Conditions and problem statement We are ...


1

An ODE is a differential equation in one dimension. An FEM model is for problems that are spacial ie, problems in higher dimensions. You want a finite difference method. It's easier to solve and understand from the perspective someone coming from ODE world. The question I think you should really be asking is how do you take your ODE, and transfer it to a ...


1

You don't say what kind of elements you plan to use. If they're 8 node linear bricks or 20 node quadratic bricks it's an "easy" problem: just create cubic regions for each different material and create your mesh. I'm guessing that the interphase/interface layer is "thin". You'll have some aspect ratio/transtion problems to sort in the matrix and inclusion ...


1

I don't know of any that exist anymore since the heyday of Pascal being used for numerical methods work in the 80's. You best bet is to look into the C++ or FORTRAN projects listed at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_numerical_libraries and either convert the code or link to the binaries. If you can use a commercial library, the NAG library has a ...


1

This does the job, if I undesrtood correctly: l = [[10312, -13.069404602050781], [10313, -28.044403076171875], [10314, -32.765602111816406], [10315, -47.353294372558594], [10312, -63.069404602050781], [10313, -78.044403076171875], [10314, -82.765602111816406], [10315, -97.353294372558594]] from pprint import pprint d = {} for i,(x,n) in ...


1

It looks like you are using a backward Euler implicit method of discretization of a diffusion PDE. A more accurate approach is the Crank-Nicolson method. Both methods are unconditionally stable. The introduction of a T-dependent diffusion coefficient requires special treatment, best probably in the form of linearization, as explained briefly here. It would ...


1

Your question refers to simulation of the fluid in the porous medium, e.g. the rock. I highly recommend using LBM instead of FEM-based methods. LBM simulates the flow in porous media by nature. Phys Review E contains publications about that approach. What is even more attractive, LBM can be also easily parallelized on GPU.


1

Only the components of strain tangent to the adjoining face are guaranteed continuous. This follows from the displacement continuity, when you take derivatives in the direction of the interface they are the same. Commercial FEM programs typically do some post process averaging to make the other components look continuous. Note the strain components normal ...


1

Here it is: from __future__ import division from numpy import asarray as ar,sum as sums A = ar([[25,-43.3,-25,43.3,0,0], [-43.3,75,43.3,-75,0,0], [-25,43.3,50,0,-25,-43.3], [43.3,-75,0,150,-43.3,-75], [0,0,-25,-43.3,25,43.3], [0,0,-43.3,-75,43.3,75]])*1e3 u4 = -0.01154 B = ar([0,0,0,u4,0,0]) F = sums(A*B,axis=1) So ...


1

In [0]: import numpy as np In [1]: A = np.random.rand(6,6) In [2]: a4 = A[3,:] In [3]: u4 = -1732/a4[3] In [4]: f = a4*u4 In [5]: f Out[5]: array([ -246.6101995 , -589.6732277 , -574.67690895, -1732. , -2592.99948033, -2383.52077134]) Replace A or atleast the fourth column a4 by your data...


1

Quadrilateral meshing is by no means easy, especially if the elements should be more or less well-formed. There are no algorithms that can deal with any arbitrary shape without deteriorating element shapes. For a whole lot of problem classes, there are algorithms in applied mathematics and computational science books and papers.


1

One way to do this is: x = 0:0.25:1; xrefined3 = [x(1):0.25/3:x(2) x(2:end-1) x(end-1):0.25/3:1]; xrefined5 = [x(1):0.25/5:x(2) x(2:end-1) x(end-1):0.25/5:1];


1

Try reading this paper for starters. This and the references therein should point you in the right direction, more or less.


1

You might be running up against bug #237223; adding -lstdc++ to LDFLAGS might help, in that case. Also, make sure you have a working gfortran in your path. Consider filing a bug against the port over at MacPorts, as well. The log file mentioned in the last line would help in diagnosing this, as would some of the context from the Python file that's running ...



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