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38

This is how I define a new function foo, run it, and save it persistently. sthorne@pearl~> function foo echo 'foo was here' end sthorne@pearl~> foo foo was here sthorne@pearl~> funcsave foo


27

Found that the greeting message is set in fishd.Machine.local. To override the following to ~/.config/fish/config.fish: set fish_greeting ""


27

The above answer works fine for static text. If you need an interactive welcome message, such as mine involving the fortune command, you can do function fish_greeting Create your fish_greeting function, I just have function fish_greeting fortune end and save it with funcsave fish_greeting


20

Maybe you should use ~/.config/fish/config.fish (fish's equivalent of .bashrc).


16

You don't need to activate to use virtualenv it is a convenience. You can just use the virtualenv directly: virtualenv venv ./venv/bin/pip install foo Have you tried from fish using . venv/bin/activate.fish It probably isn't as widely used as bash so may have issues - looking at the commit history shows a recent fix: ...


14

. .config/fish/config.fish Just a dot (.) is equivalent to source. Then it will be sourced again, so depending on what you have in there it will be reloaded. For example appending to a universal variable would add more entries. It is discussed about to change it to the more discoverable source. Which makes more sense.


11

Go to System Preferences, Users & Groups, click the lock to make changes, right click (or Control click) on your username, choose "Advanced Options" and you should have a field to change your shell. Change it there, reboot, and your new shell should take effect.


11

So to solve add this to the top of your .vimrc file : set shell=/bin/sh The problem is caused by my use of the fish shell as the default shell (set in my .tmux.conf). This post helped me sort things out - ...


11

I had, in fact, incorrectly set my environment variables. Specifically, when setting GOPATH in my ~/.config/fish/config.fish file I needed to export the variable. Put these lines in your config.fish for fish shell to use Go: set -x GOPATH $HOME/path/to/your/workspace Note the -x. That was what was missing.


9

if [ "abc" != "def" ] echo "not equal" end not equal if [ "abc" = "def" ] echo "equal" end if [ "abc" = "abc" ] echo "equal" end equal or one liner: if [ "abc" = "abc" ]; echo "equal"; end equal


9

I'd never heard of fish before this. I just installed it so I could try it out (and deleted a few paragraphs I had written here before realizing that fish is a shell). It looks like set PATH dir-name $PATH is the right syntax to prepend a directory to $PATH. But adding a relative directory name to $PATH is almost certainly a bad idea, and your shell is ...


8

The value returned in dwUserNameLen includes the null-terminator. And you are thus including it in the text. When the string is send to the Windows edit control behind the TMemo, the string is passed as a null-terminated string. And so the stray null from the user name terminates the data transfer. Change the code like this: SetLength(sUserName, ...


7

Yes, you can do it with things like that: zstyle -e ':completion:*:default' list-colors 'reply=("${PREFIX:+=(#bi)($PREFIX:t)(?)*==02=01}:${(s.:.)LS_COLORS}")' Just change the 01 and 02 colors so it matches your taste, for example to match your screenshot: zstyle -e ':completion:*:default' list-colors ...


7

Zsh has predict, run the commands below this and then hit Ctrl-X 1 or just type predict-on to give it a try #-*-shell-script-*- autoload predict-on autoload predict-off # you may also wish to bind it to some keys... zle -N predict-on zle -N predict-off bindkey '^X1' predict-on bindkey '^X2' predict-off


6

I think the answer is that using set -U is a red herring. Instead, add the following to ~/.config/fish/config.fish: if status --is-interactive set PATH $PATH ~/.local/bin; end


6

To get the same result as your command, it is the script filename you are looking for. This information is not stored in a variable, but you get this by querying status. basename (status -f) # The name of the file status -f # The full path of the file More information: http://fishshell.com/docs/2.0/commands.html#status


6

status --current-filename will output the path to the currently executing script. For more information on the status command, you can run man status or see the documentation at http://fishshell.com/docs/current/commands.html#status


6

The result of a command substitution becomes a list by splitting on newlines (technically the contents of $IFS, but modifying IFS is discouraged). So you could replace spaces with newlines, perhaps with tr: function testArray echo 1 2 3 4 end set r (testArray | tr ' ' \n) echo $r[2] Or modify the function to just output newlines directly: function ...


6

For reference, I believe the best way to persistently add a path to your $PATH is set --universal fish_user_paths $fish_user_paths ~/path/name You can use -U instead of --universal. $fish_user_paths is intended to be set by the user. More info here1 by the author of the fish shell. This will prepend to your $PATH. Since it's persistent, the path will ...


4

if there is not config.fish in ~/.config/fish/, make it. there you can write your function .function name command end


4

Make sure you are in fact using Gedit 2 and not Gedit 3 (which uses gtksourceview-3.0). For the newer, 3.0 lang files, you can put them into ~/.local/share/gtksourceview-3.0/language-spec/ If you've installed it to the correct location, you should see the name you specified in the _name attribute in the View > Highlight Mode menu under the sub menu you ...


4

That > isn't doing a comparison, it's output redirection. That is, it's taking the output of count $argv and writing it into a file called 0. You probably want something like: function ga if [ (count $argv) -gt 0 ] git add $argv else git add . end end


4

Save your files as ~/.config/fish/functions/{some_function_name}.fish and they should get autoloaded when you start fish.


4

Since those keybindings are already defined in fish_default_key_bindings I am guessing the problem lies with your terminal emulator and that it doesn't send the correct escape sequence. You should also not edit the global config /usr/share/fish/config.fish. Your custom config goes in ~/.config/fish/config.fish If you want to specify your custom key ...


4

This relates to the way variables are expanded. If a variable contains more than one element (is a list), and an argument contains a variable, then the argument is expanded separately for each element in the list. For example: > set vals 1 2 3 > echo item_$vals item_1 item_2 item_3 So in the sample code: test1 ci -m "test1 str2" This invokes the ...


4

in ~/.config/fish/fishd.(hostname) Since it's host-specific, I'd recommend you put settings you want to share in ~/.config/fish/config.fish


4

The short answer is echo bunny(seq 6) Longer answer: In keeping with fish's philosophy of replacing magical syntax with concrete commands, we should hunt for a Unix command that substitutes for the syntactic construct {1..6}. seq fits the bill; it outputs numbers in some range, and in this case, integers from 1 to 6. fish (to its shame) omits a help page ...


4

https://github.com/tarruda/zsh-autosuggestions does exactly what I wanted. If you want fish-style autopredictions in zshrc, use that.


4

It's not a bug! The command substitution (driver X) executes the driver function, and then turns each output line into an argument. In the case of (driver 0), there's no output, so you get zero arguments. So the no output case is equivalent to running test -z and test -n. Good old IEEE 1003.1 tells us what test must do in this case: 1 argument: Exit ...


4

echo a(echo b)c If you have quotes, you must exit them: echo "a"(echo b)"c" Hope that helps.



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