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Setting PATH is covered in the fish tutorial. Ordinarily you could simply modify fish_user_paths, but since you want the path to be dynamically determined on every launch, it's simpler to set PATH directly. A straightforward translation: set PHP_VERSION (ls /Applications/MAMP/bin/php/ | sort -n | tail -1) set -x PATH ...


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To enter search mode directly, you can press shift-tab. You can also press tab until the highlight is in the pager, and then just start typing: that triggers searching too.


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They stand for Esc[1;5C and Esc[1;5D. See http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/10806/how-to-change-previous-next-word-shortcut-in-bash for what these escape sequences do.


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For fish, to set an environment variable for a specific command, just use env env DEBUG="*" node index.js You'll have to quote or escape the wildcard. This approach works for bash too.


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In fish you set an environment variable with set -x. Try: set -x DEBUG "*" node index.js


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Using functions gives you a few advantages over sourcing a file: You can tab-complete function names, and add custom completions to tab-complete their arguments They can be modified using funced and funcsave There's a standard place for them in ~/.config/fish/functions They can be autoloaded. The one advantage of sourcing a file is that it can introduce ...


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The easiest way to customize the fish prompt is to use fish_config.


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fish does not have a direct analog to bash's "$(...)". The current best technique in fish is to manipulate $IFS, which are the characters that trigger splitting. You can make it empty: set -l IFS redis-cli EVAL (cat hello.lua) 0 This will pass the entire contents of hello.lua as a single argument. Assuming you don't want your IFS changes to stick around, ...


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This is fish issue #1568. There is currently no short way to do this, the long ways are: Use external programs (like find) or Do a more complicated glob like this one: ls -a **.txt .*.txt **/.*.txt These match, in order: non-dotfiles, dotfiles in the current directory, dotfiles in subdirectories.


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You're going to need to write an actual function: $ alias grepcustom="grep -r $argv ~/" $ type grepcustom grepcustom is a function with definition function grepcustom grep -r ~/ $argv; end What happened there? Since I have not defined $argv in my shell, it's replaced by an empty string, and then alias added $argv to make the function work. Let's try ...


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I don't know fish but two things. The $args variable is likely already expanded in your alias. Run alias grepcustom or whatever fish command shows you the value of the alias and you should see that. You want single quotes on the alias definition for that. Unless fish supports your manually placing $argv in the alias (instead of the normal location) this ...


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You probably have the universal variable $fish_key_bindings set to something you don't want. Try running this (just once): set -U fish_key_bindings fish_default_key_bindings


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You can use math to do arithmetic. For example: if [ (math (random)'%2') -eq 1 ] squid else cat end


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An alternative: fish ships with a function called prompt_pwd which displays /Users/me/Documents/projects/Go/project1/ as ~/D/p/G/project1 function fish_prompt echo (prompt_pwd) "><> " end


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Taken from @Jubobs' answer: basename is just a Unix utility; it's not associated to a particular shell, and should work equally well in Bash and Fish. It appeared I was using basename in the wrong context, and without a suffix. This was solved by using the following: function fish_prompt echo (basename $PWD) "><> " end



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