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1

You are having this problem because pipes will buffer stdout but not stderr, and therefore you are getting stderr output first. The only way to solve this is to not use pipes, and instead redirect your output to a temporary file. Then, work with that file for what you need to do.


1

Here you go: pass in a variable name and the number of columns you want $ function columnize -a listvarname -a ncols test (count $ncols) -eq 1; or set ncols 1 printf "%s\n" $$listvarname | \ eval paste (yes - | head -n $ncols | tr '\n' " ") | \ column -t end A demo using a non-special list name. $ set list /usr/local/bin ...


0

Try this: echo $PATH|sed 's/ /\ /g'|column -xt -c5 Note: after the \ make sure there follows a new-line


1

This isn't a Fish based solution -- but I suspect the fish answer is going to be it's not possible. You could create your aliases as .fish or .sh scripts and symlink them to /usr/local/bin -- this will give you the equivalent behaviour.


0

The fish-shell was new to me, so I read the documentation - something I really recommend. Look for the title "Initialisation Files": http://fishshell.com/docs/current/index.html#initialization So it looked like you call your python scripts from ~/.config/fish/config.fish So I installed fish on my Macbook and I had to create the config.fish file. In that ...


0

When you say "highlighted" do you mean when running ls? Probably you have $LSCOLORS set to something ugly. Here's how you can set it to something nice, in fish: set -Ux LSCOLORS gxfxbEaEBxxEhEhBaDaCaD which makes it look like so: (Just run that command once, don't put it in a startup file or anything)


0

In your config.fish load rvm plugin and call it silently: . ~/oh-my-fish/plugins/rvm/rvm rvm >/dev/null If you're using bob-the-fish theme you'll have a ruby version in your prompt like this: ruby-2.1.2 > ~/d/web > master > Which can be suppressed, if you'd like, by removing the line below in bobthefish/fish_prompt.fish: ...


0

UNTESTED: function dirs_ofFile { find -name "$1" | xargs dirname } then $ cd $(dirs_ofFile xyz.png | sed 1q) # in case there is more than one.


4

You could use dirname to strip off the last part of a path. Combined with find in your examples it would give you just the parent directory of whatever was found. You could use that in cd as in cd $(find -name "xyz.png" | xargs dirname) if that's the sort of thing you're trying to do. You can also use the -type d option to find to have it only find ...


2

Some notes on the differences: setting variables bash: var=value fish: set var value function arguments bash: "$@" fish: $argv function local variables bash: local var fish: set -l var conditionals I bash: [[ ... ]] and [ ... ] fish: test ... conditionals II bash: if cond; then cmds; fi fish: if cond; cmds; end conditionals III bash: cmd1 ...


2

count is the right way to do this. For the common case of checking whether there are any arguments, you can use its exit status: function fcd if count $argv > /dev/null open $argv else open $PWD end end To answer your second question, test -d $argv returns true if $argv is empty, because POSIX requires that when test is ...


1

$argv is a list, so you want to look at the first element, if there are elements in that list: if begin; test (count $argv) -gt 0; and test -d $argv[1]; end open $argv[1] else open $PWD end


1

Exact issue discussed on fish users mailing list: Discussed on fish users mailing list: http://sourceforge.net/p/fish/mailman/message/33644843/ You have to modify the IFS variable to do this: $ set out (seq 5) $ echo "$out" 1 2 3 4 5 $ set oldIFS "$IFS" $ set IFS "" $ set out (seq 5) $ echo "$out" 1 2 3 4 5 $ set IFS "$oldIFS"



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